Scaffolding guided inquiry magnetism and electricity lighting the bulb
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Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Magnetism and Electricity – Lighting the Bulb. How Students Learn Science National Research Council (2005). Engage to activate prior knowledge Develop competence Deep foundation of factual knowledge Understand facts in the context of big ideas

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Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Magnetism and Electricity – Lighting the Bulb

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Scaffolding guided inquiry magnetism and electricity lighting the bulb

Scaffolding Guided InquiryMagnetism and Electricity – Lighting the Bulb


How students learn science national research council 2005

How Students Learn ScienceNational Research Council (2005)

  • Engage to activate prior knowledge

  • Develop competence

    • Deep foundation of factual knowledge

    • Understand facts in the context of big ideas

    • Organize knowledge to facilitate retrieval

      and application

  • Utilize metacognitive approaches to instruction


Science literacy connection

Science-Literacy Connection

  • Best Practices

  • Research-Based Strategies

  • Lessons Learned


Strengthening lesson planning

Strengthening Lesson Planning


Scaffolding guided inquiry

Scaffolding Guided Inquiry

Intended

Curriculum

Intended

Curriculum

Implemented

Curriculum

Implemented

Curriculum

Achieved

Curriculum

Achieved

Curriculum

Not Aligned

Aligned

Based on Marzano (2001)


Magnetism and electricity

Magnetism and Electricity

Lighting the Bulb

+

-


Intended curriculum

Intended Curriculum

  • Big Idea

  • Lesson Content Goals and Guiding Questions

  • Standard being addressed


Intended curriculum1

Intended Curriculum

  • Magnetism and electricity are part of a single force.

BIG IDEA


Guiding questions

1) Using a wire, a battery and a bulb, what does it require to light the bulb? What is the role of the battery, the bulb and the wire?

1) It requires a complete loop (circuit from one end of an energy source (battery) through an energy receiver (bulb) and return to the other end of the battery to light the bulb. The wire (energy conductor) is the pathway for the energy to flow between the energy source and the energy receiver.

LESSON CONTENT GOALS

GUIDING QUESTIONS

2) A closed circuit is a complete loop that allows electricity to flow; an open circuit does not make a complete loop and the electricity will not flow.

2) What are the differences between an open and closed circuit?


Kit inventory

Kit Inventory

  • What color is this?

  • What can this be used for?

  • Where have you seen this before?


Word wall

Word Wall


Implemented curriculum

IMPLEMENTED CURRICULUM

  • Engaging scenario

  • Focus Question

  • Prediction

  • Data

  • Claims and Evidence

  • Conclusion

  • Reflection


Engaging scenario

Engaging Scenario

You and your friends are at Disneyland. You decide to go on the Haunted Mansion ride. You get on the ride. The ride starts. Then all of a sudden the ride stops and everything goes pitch black except for the screams and howls inside the Haunted Mansion. Then a voice comes on the speaker. “Ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls this is the ride technician at Disneyland. I have some good news and bad news for you.”


Scaffolding guided inquiry magnetism and electricity lighting the bulb

“The good news is that power will be restored. The bad news is that it may not be until tomorrow and you will spend the night in the dark in the Haunted Mansion. There is a way to get out before tomorrow. If you reach into the front of your car you will find a ziplock bag. Inside the bag are a a wire, a battery and a bulb. There is a way to assemble them to make a light to find your way out before tomorrow morning.”


Engaging scenario1

Engaging Scenario

The good news is you find some objects in your ziplock bag that may help you.

  • A small bulb

  • Wire

  • A battery


Scaffolding guided inquiry magnetism and electricity lighting the bulb

You and your friends have a problem.

What is the problem here?

?


Focus question criteria

Focus QuestionCriteria

  • Provides students a role

  • Is a simple question directly related to the scenario that can be investigated with results that can be communicated.

  • Cannot be answered “yes” or “no”.


Focus question

FOCUS QUESTION

With your group discuss a focus question and record it in your notebook. Be prepared to share with the class.

1ST NOTEBOOK ENTRY


Focus question s

Focus Question(s)

How can we find a way to light the bulb using a battery, wire and bulb?


Prediction gives students a stake in the results

Prediction Gives students a stake in the results

  • Write a prediction describing what you think will happen - an answer to the focus question.

  • Conditional statements

    If ………. then …….. will

    happen because…..

    or

    I think ……. will happen because ……

2ND NOTEBOOK ENTRY


Planning steps

Planning Steps

  • General Plan

    • What should be changed?

      (independent variable)

    • What should be kept the same?

      (controlled variable)

    • What kind of effect will be observed/measured?

      (dependent variable)

  • Operational Plan

    • First …

    • Second….

    • Third…

    • Next…

    • Finally….

  • Data Organizer


Scaffolding guided inquiry magnetism and electricity lighting the bulb

Task

  • Diagram at least three ways to light the bulb

  • Diagram at least three ways the bulb did not light

  • Accurately label your diagrams.


Things to consider

Things to consider

  • How are you going to organize your diagrams? (data)

Data Organizer ?


Data organizing and planning

DATAOrganizing and planning

Before you begin solving the problem,

How will you organize your data?

Discuss with your group the design of the chart and record it in the notebook. You may not start testing your prediction until your chart is ready.

3rd NOTEBOOK ENTRY


Symbols to use in your diagrams

Symbols to Use in Your Diagrams

+

l

-

Light Bulb

Wire

Battery


Making meaning conference

Making Meaning Conference

  • Planned discussion that uses an organizer to make thinking visible.


Making meaning conference1

Making Meaning Conference

  • What patterns can we see from our data?

  • What about the outliers?

  • What claims can we make?

  • What evidence do we have to support our claims?


Making meaning conference2

Making Meaning Conference

  • Discussion Points – Guiding Questions.

  • Using a wire, a battery and a bulb, what does it require to light the bulb? What is the role of the battery, the bulb, and the wire? (What were you going to observe or measure)

  • What are the differences between a closed (a circuit that lights the bulb) and an open (a circuit that does not light the bulb) circuit? What is your evidence?


Examining your data

Examining Your Data

  • Look at your diagrams showing when the bulb did not light

    • Where did the wire touch the bulb?

    • Where did the bulb touch the battery?


Examining your data1

Examining Your Data

  • What claims can you make about the ways the bulb did not light?

  • What was your evidence?

    I claim the bulb did not light because ……….


Examining your data2

ExaminingYour Data

  • Look at your diagrams showing when the bulb lit

    • Where did the wire touch the bulb?

    • Where did the bulb touch the battery?


Examining your data3

Examining Your Data

  • These places are called critical contact points

  • Be sure to label the critical contact points on your diagrams


Examining your data4

Examining Your Data

  • What claims can you make about the ways the bulb lit?

  • What was your evidence?

    I claim the bulb lit because ………….


Writing claims supported by evidence

Writing Claims Supported by Evidence

I claim thatI claim this because

I know thatI know this because


Scaffolding guided inquiry magnetism and electricity lighting the bulb

Claims and evidence


Conclusion

CONCLUSION

  • Look at your prediction again.

  • How did the evidence support your

  • prediction?

  • Do you wish to affirm or revise your

  • prediction? Why?

  • My prediction was accurate because…..

  • I wish to revise my prediction

  • because…


Conclusion1

CONCLUSION

Write a concluding sentence using one of the stems:

“Today I learned … .”

or

“In conclusion, … .”


Reflection

REFLECTION

Think about the investigation we just completed. Use one of the stems below to write a reflection regarding the investigation.

What if …?

What really surprised me about this investigation was … ?

A new question I have now is… ?

I want to know more about ... ?

I am confused about … ?


Guiding questions1

1) Using a wire, a battery and a bulb, what does it require to light the bulb? What is the role of the battery, the bulb and the wire?

1) It requires a complete loop (circuit from one end of an energy source (battery) through an energy receiver (bulb) and return to the other end of the battery to light the bulb. The wire (energy conductor) is the pathway for the energy to flow between the energy source and the energy receiver.

LESSON CONTENT GOALS

GUIDING QUESTIONS

2)A closed circuit is a complete loop that allows electricity to flow; an open circuit does not make a complete loop and the electricity will not flow.

2) What are the differences between an open and closed circuit?


Achieved curriculum

Achieved Curriculum

  • How do we know if the intended curriculum is met if effective feedback is not in place?


Feedback issues evidence and you

Feedback “Issues, Evidence, and You.”

  • For example:

  • What evidence do you have in your data to support your claims?

  • What claims can you make from your evidence?

  • What is another explanation for what happened?


Feedback research

Feedback Research

  • Academic achievement in classes where effective feedback is provided to students is considerably higher than the achievement in classes where it is not. (Marzano, 2001)

  • The most powerful single modification for improving education must be “dollops” of feedback.

    (Hattie, 1992)

  • Students’ communication skills and understanding did not improve over the course of instruction during the school year. This latter result may be due, in part, to the fact that teachers provided little, if any, feedback.

    (Shavelson, 2003)


Scaffolding guided inquiry magnetism and electricity lighting the bulb

  • Task Specific

  • FEEDBACK GUIDE

  • What were students expected to do in their notebooks?

  • Focus Question – Investigable

  • Prediction - uses “because”

  • Data Organizer with headings /title

    • 3 accurate labeled diagrams that lit and the paths are traced using arrows

  • 3 accurate labeled diagrams of connections that did not light.

  • Claims and Evidence

    • Claims show understanding of the content of the Intended Curriculum.

    • Claims are complete and supported by evidence.

    • Examples given are clear, accurate, and labeled.

  • Conclusion

  • Reflection


Scaffolding guided inquiry magnetism and electricity lighting the bulb

  • Task Specific

  • FEEDBACK GUIDE

  • What were students expected to do in their notebooks?

  • Focus Question – Investigable

  • Prediction - uses “because”

  • Data Organizer with headings /title

    • 3 accurate labeled diagrams that lit and the paths are traced using arrows

  • 3 accurate labeled diagrams of connections that did not light.

  • Claims and Evidence

    • Claims show understanding of the content of the Intended Curriculum.

    • Claims are complete and supported by evidence.

    • Examples given are clear, accurate, and labeled.

  • Conclusion

  • Reflection


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