The Impacts of Homeownership on Educational Outcomes and Public Schools

The Impacts of Homeownership on Educational Outcomes and Public Schools PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 156 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Educational Outcomes of Homeowner Children. Donald Haurin (2003): Simple difference in average test scores comparing homeowners vs. renters (no controls):Math scores are 36% better for children of owners than children of rentersReading scores are 31% greater for children of owners than children

Download Presentation

The Impacts of Homeownership on Educational Outcomes and Public Schools

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


1. Joe Honeycutt Operational Partnerships Habitat for Humanity International [email protected] The Impacts of Homeownership on Educational Outcomes and Public Schools

2. Educational Outcomes of Homeowner Children Donald Haurin (2003): Simple difference in average test scores comparing homeowners vs. renters (no controls): Math scores are 36% better for children of owners than children of renters Reading scores are 31% greater for children of owners than children of renters Behavior problems are 8% lower for children of owners But are these differences caused by other factors that differ between owners and renters (e.g. income, wealth, marital status, etc)?

3. Educational Outcomes of Homeowner Children Haurin (2003): Some of the differences are attributable to other factors, but NOT all The independent impact of homeownership combined with its positive impact on the home environment yields the following results for children of owners: Math scores that are 9% higher Reading scores that are 7% higher A reduction in children’s behavior problems by 3% The longer one owns their home; the greater the effect. These differences are huge. To get the same differenceThese differences are huge. To get the same difference

4. Educational Attainment Green and White (1994) Children of homeowners more likely to be attending school at age 17 Less likely to drop out Aaronson (2000) Probability of homeowner children graduating by 19th birthday is 9.6% higher Longer residential duration has an additional positive impact on educational attainment. Homeownership effect is stronger in a low income community than a high income community.

5. Student Mobility Regarding student mobility, Hanushek (1999): Moving has a significant negative impact in the year of the move and there is little or no recovery of lost achievement in the subsequent year. Minorities and economically disadvantaged students are much more sensitive to moving than whites and more advantaged students Students in schools with high turnover suffer a disadvantage, even if they do not move. As referenced in Romance (2002)

6. Student Mobility Student Mobility Has Negative Effects for Transient Students, Schools, Teachers, and Classmates Mobility is associated with lower student achievement (Fowler-Finn, 2001). An achievement gap exists between schools with a high mobility rate and those that are more stable (Kerbow, 1996). Classroom instruction in schools with higher mobility rates is more likely to be review oriented and have slower instructional pacing from month to month and grade to grade (Kerbow, 1996). High school students who change schools are at least twice as likely not to graduate—research indicates that only 60 percent will graduate (Rumberger, Larson, Ream, & Palardy, 1999). In all income categories, highly mobile students are more likely to be retained a grade than children who do not change schools (Fowler-Finn, 2001). - North Central Regional Educational Laboratory

7. Policy Implications State and local governments should consider whether it is optimal to improve children’s performance in schools by spending on schools (teacher salaries, physical space and equipment) OR spending to promote homeownership. Promoting homeownership MAY have a larger positive effect on child outcomes. Haurin, D., The Impact of Homeownership, Habitat for Humanity University Lecture Series, Dec. 11, 2003

8. Policy Implications “Hanushek (1986, 1996) finds mixed results about the educational value of additional school inputs including expenditure per pupil. Thus, the general policy effort to improve the educational attainment of children should consider innovative programs that encourage homeownership of targeted households as alternatives to additional government input on school inputs.” (p.16) Haurin, Parcel & Haurin. “The Impact of Homeownership on Child Outcomes”, LIHO-01.14 , Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University, Oct. 2001

9. Transformation of Systems That Impact Affordable Housing – Goal 3 Can change in a community be sustained if it is served by a poor performing school that doesn’t improve? Does school performance affect property value? If the private benefits of homeownership can impact the educational outcomes of the children of homeowners, what might happen if the affiliate builds its homes in a planned community at some level of scale? (See N. Romance, 2002) What might happen if that community was planned in partnership with other organizations that serve families in that community, and in partnership with the local school ?

10. Effects of Homeownership on Public Schools

11. Resources Aaronson, Daniel. “A Note on the Benefits of Homeownership,” Journal of Urban Economics 47 (2000): 356-369 Green, Richard and M. White. “Measuring the Benefits of Homeowning: Effects on Children, “ Journal of Urban Economics 41 (1997): 441-461. Haurin, Parcel & Haurin. “The Impact of Homeownership on Child Outcomes”, LIHO-01.14 , Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University, Oct. 2001 Haurin, D., The Impact of Homeownership, Habitat for Humanity University Lecture Series, Dec. 11, 2003 Hanushek, E.A. “The Economics of Schooling: Production and Efficiency in Public Schools,” Journal of Economic Literature 24 (1986): 1141-1177

12. Resources Hanushek, E.A. “School Resources and Student Performance.” In Does Money Matter? The Effect of School Resources on Student Achievement and Adult Success. Edited by G. Burtless. Washington, D.C., Brookings Institution, 1996 Hanushek, E.A., J. Kain, and S. Rivkin. “The Costs of Switching Schools.” Working paper. Rochester, NY: Rochester University, 1999. Family Housing Fund. “Kids Mobility Project” Minneapolis, MN. http://www.fhfund.org/_dnld/reports/kids.pdf North Central Regional Educational Laboratory, “Student Mobility’s Effect on Academic Achievement”. http://www.ncrel.org/policy/pubs/html/rmobile/effect.htm Romance, N. “Homeownership and Our Public Schools: A Brief Overview and Study of the Royal Terrace/Fairway Oaks Case, An unpublished article, Habitat for Humanity of Jacksonville, 2002.

  • Login