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Sexual health technologies in context Dr Mark Davis School of Political and Social Inquiry School of Population Health Seminar The University of Queensland Tuesday 9 July 2013. Overview. More on sexual health technologies Social, economic and technological factors

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Sexual health technologies in context

Dr Mark Davis

School of Political and Social Inquiry

School of Population Health Seminar

The University of Queensland

Tuesday 9 July 2013


Overview
Overview

  • More on sexual health technologies

  • Social, economic and technological factors

  • Reshaping of sexual health

  • Unexpected effects

  • Disclosure technologies


Sexual health technologies
Sexual health technologies

  • Pre- and Post Exposure Prophylaxis

  • HIV self-testing (Frith 2007).

  • Online contact-tracing for syphilis (Klausner, et al. 2000)

  • E-dating profiles (Levine and Klausner 2005)

  • Barebacking websites (Davis 2009)


Sexual health s technological imaginary
Sexual health’s technological imaginary

  • Assemblage of knowledge production, relationality and material life in such a way as to exercise improved control over the transmission and treatment of STIs

  • Hybrids of diagnostic and social media tech with ramifications for sexual decision-making


Social and economic contexts
Social and economic contexts

  • Surveillance medicine in affluent countries (Armstrong 1995)

  • Increased lifespans + chronic disease (Aronowitz 2009)

  • More diseases and disease states are being discovered (Webster 2007)

  • Increased expectations/costs


Self management
Self-management

  • healthdirect.org.au

  • medibank.com.au

  • healthcoach4me.com (Glaxo)

  • lumigenix.com

  • genetrackaustralia.com


New kinds of clinics
New kinds of clinics

  • Outreach clinics for sexual health, 1970s

  • Cindy Patton’s Rebirth of the clinic (2010)

  • Qld geographic and social outreach

  • PCR testing for chlamydia


Unexpected effects
Unexpected effects

  • Catherine Montgomery’s research on clinical trials of vaginal microbicides in Zambia (2012)

    • microbicide emerged as a gender and relational technology

  • How can we keep up with populations?

  • What role can be played by social research?


Disclosure technologies
Disclosure technologies

<David> ...I set up a new profile that said ‘‘Never’’ to safe sex and I was completely blatant about my HIV status—it was only alluded to in the former profile...

<Davide> I had changed my old profile to use some of the euphemisms to allude to POZ status so I presume he did...

<MD> what are some of the euphemisms...

<David> ‘‘Positive outlook on life’’...

<David> My uncompromising stance is less than 12 months old.

<David> Yes.

<MD> What uncompromising stance is that?

<David> That I only have unprotected sex.

<MD> What made u change?

<David> Realizing that I much preferred it.


<MD> What made u adjust yr profile

<David> For the majority of the period since I was diagnosed I had had only protected sex.

<MD> Can u expand?

<David> Realizing that every man was out for the most pleasure HE could get—why should I not have the same rule?

<MD> So is this a way for you to get pleasure while reducing HIV risk?

<David> It is also only in the last 15–18 months that I had realized there was such a large subculture of POZ men having unprotected sex.

<MD> What made u realize that?

<David> I think that the number of profiles on gaydar explicit about that has risen markedly in that period.

<MD> How do you feel about being open about yr status on the net?

<David> I think it is important (Davis et al., 2006: 166-167)



SMS

“A message from letthemknow.org.au. [Name of recipient] u may be at risk of Chlamydia. Pls have a sexual health check. See website or phone [Telephone number supplied] PLEASE DO NOT REPLY.”


Conclusion
Conclusion

  • Sexual health technologies have a social and economic history

  • Sexual health clinic is moving outside its walls

  • Such contexts point to socio-technical systems; serendipity; complexity

  • How can we expand our own conversation on sexual health’s new technologies?


References
References

  • Armstrong, D. (1995). "The rise of surveillance medicine." Sociology of Health and Illness 17(3): 393-404.

  • Aronowitz, R. A. (2009). "The Converged Experience of Risk and Disease." Milbank Quarterly 87(2): 417-442.

  • Davis, M. (2009). Sex, Technology and Public Health. Houndmills, UK Palgrave.

  • Davis, M., G. Hart, et al. (2006). "Sex and the Internet: gay men, risk reduction and serostatus." Culture, Health and Sexuality 8(2): 161-174.

  • Frith, L. (2007). "HIV self-testing: a time to revise current policy." The Lancet 369(9557): 243-245.

  • Klausner, J., W. Wolf, et al. (2000). "Tracing a syphilis outbreak through cyberspace." Journal of the American Medical Association 284(4): 447-449.

  • Levine, D. and J. Klausner (2005). "Lessons learned from tobacco control: A proposal for public health policy initiatives to reduce the consequences of high-risk sexual behaviour among men who have sex with men and use the internet." Sexuality Research & Social Policy 2(1): 51-58.

  • Montgomery, C. (2012). "Making prevention public: The co-production of gender and technology in HIV prevention research." Social Studies of Science 42(6): 922-944.

  • Patton, C ed. (2010) Rebirth of the clinic: Places and agents in contemporary health care. Minneapolis, U of Minnesota Press,

  • Webster, A. (2007). Health, technology & society: A sociological critique. Houndmills, Palgrave.


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