Beyond the data retreat
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Beyond the Data Retreat. Julie Popham Barb Rowenhorst. Transition. Oh, the places we’ll go. Write something about a land form/object from a place you were this summer and how that compares to assessment. Transition.

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Beyond the data retreat

Beyond the Data Retreat

Julie Popham

Barb Rowenhorst


Oh the places we ll go

Transition

Oh, the places we’ll go

Write something about a land form/object from a place you were this summer and how that compares to assessment.


Transition

Transition

Assessment is like a beach ball because… it keeps you focused on student learning rather than bouncing around with your instruction.


Transition1

Transition

Synectics – Greek word meaning:

  • Bringing together of diverse elements.

  • Metaphorical problem-solving process that promotes creative thinking.


Norms

Norms

  • Listen with Engagement – Be Fully Engaged

  • Honor Each Other’s Thinking

  • Honor Private Think Time

  • Everyone has a Voice

  • Be Respectful of all Comments

  • Limit Side Conversation

  • Take Care of Your Needs

  • Cell Phones Off/Vibrate


Agenda

Agenda


Beyond the data retreat

LiveBinder Materials

http://bit.ly/1q8hOqp

Access Code

DOE


Beyond the data retreat

SD DOE Aspirations

OUTCOME #1: Students enter 4th grade proficient or advanced in reading.


Beyond the data retreat

SD DOE Aspirations

OUTCOME #2: Students enter 9th grade proficient or advanced in math.


Beyond the data retreat

SD DOE Aspirations

OUTCOME #3: Increase the academic success of Native American students.


Beyond the data retreat

SD DOE Aspirations

OUTCOME #4: Students graduate high school ready for postsecondary and the workforce.


Doe menu option

DOE Menu Option


Outcomes

Outcomes

  • Recognize why data needs to be analyzed at the student level.

  • Focus on individual student data when using a data-driven cycle.

  • Implement a data-driven cycle of assessment, analysis, and action to inform instruction.

  • Plan for instruction based on information gathered during the data-driven cycle.


Assignments day 1

Assignments – Day 1

  • Prior to this training (Day 2), participants were given the following assignment:


Assessment for learning

Assessment for Learning

  • “In reviewing 250 studies from around the world, published between 1987 and 1998, we found that a focus by teachers on assessment for learning, as opposed to assessment of learning, produced a substantial increase in students’ achievement.”

    Paul Black & Dylan Wiliam, (1998)

    Assessment and Classroom Learning,

    Assessment in Education: Principle, Policy, and Practice, 5 (1),pp. 7-73.


Beyond the data retreat

Richard Stiggins Jan Chappuis

Dylan Wiliam


Beyond the data retreat

James Popham

Thomas Guskey


Beyond the data retreat

Douglas Fisher

Nancy Frey

Doug Reeves


Beyond the data retreat

Robert Marzano

Connie Moss


It is

It IS….

  • a window into student’s thinking and learning and “…a significant model of school improvement from within.”

    Harvard Project Zero

  • a way to “build the capacity of school faculties to improve the quality of instruction…through a critical review of student work.”

    Academy for Educational Development


Beyond the data retreat

I taught my dog Spot

how to whistle.

I don’t hear him whistling.

I said I taught him;

I didn’t say he learned it.

It Isn’t….

It is assessment that helps us know the difference between teaching and learning.


Assessment for learning1

Assessment for Learning

“You are just asking kids to keep you informed regarding how well they understand something.”

James Popham


Assessment for learning2

Assessment for Learning

Everything students might….

  • say

  • do

  • create

    has the potential to be formative because it can

    provide information about how much

    they understand and helps the teacher plan

    the next steps of instruction.


Assessment for learning3

Assessment for Learning

“The greatest value in formative assessment lies in teachers and students making use of results to improve real-time teaching and learning at every turn.”

Chappuis & Chappuis, 2007

The Best Value in Formative Assessment


Video

Video

Assessment for learning can take many different forms in the classroom. It consists of anything teachers do to help students answer three questions…

  • Atkin, Black, & Coffey, 2001


Assessment for learning4

Assessment for Learning

Assessment for learning, supports learningin two ways:

  • Teachers can adapt instruction on the basis of evidence, making changes and improvements that will yield immediate benefits to student learning.

  • Students can use evidence of their current progress to actively manage and adjust their own learning.

    • Stiggins, Arter, Chappuis, & Chappuis, 2006


Assessment for learning5

Assessment for Learning

“The goal of assessment for learning is not to eliminate failure, but rather to keep failure from becoming chronic and thus inevitable in the mind of the learner.”

Rick Stiggins, 2007

Assessment Through the Stdent’s Eyes


Assessment for learning6

Assessment for Learning

  • Assessment for learning begins when teachers

    • Share achievement targets with students

    • Present those expectations in student-friendly language accompanied by examples of exemplary student work

    • Give frequent student self-assessments with continual access to descriptive feedback in appropriate, manageable amounts

    • Have students chart their trajectory toward the “transparent achievement” targets their teachers have established.


The student s emotional reaction will determine what that student does in response

The student’s emotional reaction will determine what that student does in response.

The target needs to be in reach…

“I understand, I’m OK, and I choose to keep trying.”

“I see, I can’t do this and I will give up.”


Beyond the data retreat

“You can enhance or destroy students’ desire to succeed in school more quickly and

permanently through your use of

assessment than with any other tools you have at your disposal.”

Do you agree or disagree with this statement?

Include evidence from the article to support your thinking.


Assessment connections

Assessment Connections


Beyond the data retreat

I always did well on essay tests. Just put everything you know on there, maybe you'll hit it. And then you get the paper back from the teacher and she's written just one word across the entire page, "vague." I thought vague was kind of vague. I'd write underneath it "unclear," and send it back. She'd return it to me, "ambiguous." I'd send it back to her, "cloudy." We're still corresponding to this day...hazy...muddy...

Jerry Seinfeld

SeinLanguage


Beyond the data retreat

1


Past focus

Past Focus

  • Big Picture

  • Accountability

  • How are we doing?

    • District?

    • School?


Determinations

Determinations...

  • Based on

    • Proficiency Levels

    • Benchmarks

    • Standards

    • Create a plan

      • Raise group performance

      • Meet accountability standards


Consider this

Consider this...


Beyond the data retreat

2


Beyond the data retreat

  • We cannot help children academically until we know why they are struggling.

  • We cannot turn around failure until we know why students have fallen behind.

  • We cannot appropriately change instruction to the benefit of students until we know what they know and what they don't know.

  • We have to know why their data looks like it does and the why involves considerably more that numbers.


An illustration

An illustration...


Are skills improving

Are skills improving?


How far has he come

How far has he come?


Reasons for improvement

Reasons for improvement

  • A teacher who understands

    • How to scaffold learning for the child

    • That foundational skills need to be mastered for higher level skills to be learned

    • Research based instructional strategies

    • Student motivation is fueled by academic success

    • How to study data and apply it to daily instruction

    • That data is more than numbers


A secondary example

A secondary example

Consider a secondary student who is doing poorly in...

American History

Accounting

Physics

Where do we look for the solution?


Common response

Common response

  • Special Education

  • Accommodations

    • Extended time

    • Modified grades

    • Alternative classes

    • Reduce the content

    • Reduce expectations

    • Mission? Destination?

      • Graduate and earn a diploma


What s the next step

What's the next step?

  • We've analyzed student skills and determined:

    • The student can read and comprehend

    • The student possesses necessary skills in mathematics

    • Does well on short answer exams and quizzes

    • Exhibits difficulty with extended response and lab write ups

Chemistry


Let s get ready

Let's get ready...

  • Let's focus on instruction and planning

  • Let's think about student engagement and motivation as a teaching responsibility

  • Let's get in the right mindset and get ready to examine how students respond to what we do with students every day


Data analysis

Data Analysis

  • Data are useless without a good analysis.

  • A step-by-step method for understanding data can inform planning, teaching, and learning.

  • The results of the analysis can be used to improve student learning.

    “How to Survive Data Overload,” Principal Leadership, October 2006


Using results

Using Results

  • Let’s get a clear picture of students’ understanding and application of knowledge and skills

  • Let’s compare student performance to expectations and provide feedback

  • Let’s evaluate the effectiveness of teaching strategies

  • Let’s recognize challenge areas and adjust instruction accordingly

  • Let’s celebrate and learn from success!


Using results1

Using Results

  • Let’s frequently monitor progress in order to:

    • Adjust instruction as necessary to meet student needs

    • Assist students in knowing their current status and next steps towards achieving a higher level of success.


Using results2

Using Results

  • Teachers use and respond to assessment results, students are the key users of the results.

    • Where am I now?

    • Where do I need to be?

    • How can I get there?

    • What help do I need?

Intentional Instruction

Aligned Assessment


Formative assessment process

Formative Assessment Process

Handout 1

  • Adapted from the Webinar by Eileen Depka, PhD

  • Director of Continuous Improvement and Assessment


Step 1

Step 1

1. Clarify the Learning Target

Once we determine our learning targets and define how we should assess them,

then we can plan clear instruction and experiences and can best combine them to prepare students to know what they need to know and demonstrate their learning.

Larry Ainsworth


Beyond the data retreat

Step 2

2. Determine the format & purpose.

  • What is it that we want to assess?

  • How will the assessment help us to evaluate what the student knows and can do?

    • Look at the standard(s) and determine what will be assessed.

      • Disaggregated standards http://sdccteachers.k12.sd.us/

      • Unpacked standards for those that aren’t CCSS

    • Decide on what format will best work.

    • Create or identify the assessment.


Step 2

Step 2

2. Determine the format & purpose

Look at the standard(s) and determine what will be assessed..

  • Test items need to be well written

  • Test samples appropriately

    • Appropriate number of items related to a skill in order to say whether a student does/doesn’t have this skill(s)

  • Items have to match important learning outcomes


Step 21

Step 2

2. Determine the format & purpose

Decide on what format/assessment method will best work.

Selected Respons

Multiple Choice

True/False

Labeling

Matching

Fill-in-the-blank/Short answer

Extended Written Response

Constructed Response

Essay

Performance

Application of knowledge and skills

Products/Projects

Demonstrations

Oral Communication

Conferences

Interviews


Step 3

Step 3

3. Administer the assessment


Beyond the data retreat

Step 4

4. Organize the data

  • Collect and organize the data.

  • What is it that we want the student(s) to be able to know and do?

  • How will you organize the data to make it easier to analyze the strengths and areas of need?


Beyond the data retreat

Step 5

5. Evaluate data to determine strengths and areas of need.

  • Because the assessment was based on specific components of the standards, compare the result with the expected result.

  • The results will indicate areas of strength and challenge.


Step 5

Step 5

  • 5. Evaluate data to determine strengths and areas of need.

Rich, complex work samples show us how students are thinking, the fullness of their factual knowledge, the connections they are making.

Talking about them together in an accountable way helps us to learn how to adjust instruction to meet the needs of our students.

Looking at Student Work Website


Step 6

Step 6

  • 6. Create and implement plans to close the gap.


Beyond the data retreat

Step 6

6. Create and implement plans to close the gap.

  • Close the gap betweenexpectationand performance by employing different instructional approaches and materials, based on what we have learned about our students.

  • Next steps in responding to the data would include determining the best way to teach follow-up lessons in order to close the gaps in understanding.

    • How the concepts will be taught and practiced.

    • What resources will be used to re-teach.

    • How you will know that this was successful?


Beyond the data retreat

Example – Reading

Letter Names


Step 11

STEP 1

  • Clarify the target


Step 22

STEP 2

2. Determine the format and purpose


Step 31

STEP 3


Step 4

STEP 4

4. Organize the data


Step 51

STEP 5

  • 5. Examine strengths and areas of need based on data.


Step 61

STEP 6

6. Create and implement plans to close the gap.

What really counts is what happens after the assessments.” “…what mattes most with formative assessments is how students and teachers use the results.”

Thomas R. Guskey

Based on error patterns and working one-on-one or in a small group of children with the same letter naming deficits

  • Begin with instruction of letter names concentrating on letters that will be seen frequently in early reading

    • Vowels, b, c, t, etc.

  • Take care not to present visually or phonologically similar letters together


Step 6 cont

Step 6 cont.

  • Teach the letter name followed by a variety of practice activities

    • Present students with the target letter in various forms and say the name of each letter

    • Repeatedly trace the target letter

    • Repeatedly write the letter while saying the name of the letter

      • Use a variety of mediums

    • Using three dimensional letters have students draw them from a container and identify them by name with eyes closed

    • Search for target letter in printed materials


Step 6 cont1

Step 6 cont.

  • Assess progress weekly to determine effectiveness and if instruction is effective:

    • Continue to add additional letters as letters are mastered

    • As new letters are added for instruction continue to include those that have been previously mastered

    • As letters are mastered add letter sound instruction for those that are visually and phonologically similar

  • If instruction is ineffective:

    • Check to ensure that content is appropriate

    • make sure there are no missing pre-requisite skills that must be mastered before this instruction can be learned

    • slow the pace of instruction

    • place child in a smaller group

    • add additional sessions,


Step 52

STEP 5

  • 5. Examine strengths and areas of need based on data.


Step 62

STEP 6

6. Create and implement plans to close the gap.

Since the student is familiar with names of letters, instruction will focus on discrimination of visually similar letters

  • Instructional activities will be the same or similar to the instruction used with the previous student but with a focus on discrimination

    • Begin with two letters that are visually similar

    • Move through the instruction and practice activities at an appropriate pace

    • Add a third letter that is visually similar and teach in conjunction with letters that have been mastered


Let s evaluate

Let’s evaluate…

The Seductive Allure of Data

W. James Popham

  • According to Popham what are the five attributes of an instructionally useful test?

  • Define each attribute.


Beyond the data retreat

  • Significance

    • Measures students’ attainment of a worthwhile aim

  • Teachability

    • Measures something teachable

    • If a teacher delivers reasonably effective instruction aimed at the test’s assessment targets, students should be able to master what the test measures.

  • Describability

    • Directly based on clear descriptions of the skills and knowledge it measures.

  • Reportability

    • Results are reported at a specific enough level to inform teachers about he effectiveness of the instruction they provide

  • Nonintrusiveness

    • Shouldn’t take too long to administer


Your turn

Your turn…

  • Think of specific skills you teach.

  • How do you assess those skills?

  • How might you re-teach or provide additional instructional support to those students who have not yet mastered the skills that are required for content mastery?

  • How will you know the skills have been mastered?


Beyond the data retreat

Example – Math

Single-Digit Addition Within 20


Step 12

Step 1

Clarify the learning target


Step 23

Step 2

2. Determine the format and purpose


Step 32

Step 3

3. Administer the assessment

  • This is a pretest of addition within 20

  • Say to the student, “I want to know how many of these problems you know. By “know,” I mean you know them right away. If you have to count on your fingers, you do not know it and you would skip that problem. Do only the problems you know. Skip those that you don’t know. You will have 3 minutes to do this.”

When the child is done, have him/her circle all those s/he didn’t know.


Step 41

Step 4

  • By student

4. Organize the data (Student)


Step 53

Step 5

  • 5. Evaluate the data to determine strengths and areas of need

0

X

0


Step 54

Step 5

  • 5. Evaluate the data to determine strengths and areas of need


Step 55

Step 5

5. Evaluate the data to determine strengths and areas of need


Step 56

Step 5

  • 5. Evaluate the data to determine strengths and areas of need


Step 57

Step 5

  • 5. Evaluate the data to determine strengths and areas of need

  • Insert Ma/Pa Kettle video


Step 63

Step 6

  • 6. Create and implement plans to close the gap.

  • Looking at the student’s chart/data…

    • What prerequisite skill is needed in order to master the standard (chart)?

    • What does s/he know that you can build upon to move the student to the next step in his/her learning?

    • Which errors are simple mistakes and which show an area of need with the concept/skill?

    • Why might they have made that error?

    • Is there a pattern of errors?

    • Are other students exhibiting the same type of errors? If so, would small group instruction work best?


Step 64

Step 6

  • 6. Create and implement plans to close the gap.

Sample Cognitive Guided Instruction (CGI) Questions

  • You know the double 7 + 7. I wonder how you can use 7 + 7 to help you solve 8 + 7? (Near doubles)

  • You know your 10 plus strategy in 10 + 7. How can you use 10 + 7 to help you solve 9 + 7? (Plus 9)


Step 65

Step 6

6. Create and implement plans to close the gap.

  • Validate if necessary. Using the error patterns, a 1:1 interview with the combinations cards could be done to validate any error patterns.

  • Do a 1:1 interview with the lowest combination card set.

  • Begin with addition in that set, then subtraction in that same set before advancing to the next combination set.

  • Observational notes during 1:1 interview, small group instruction, and while student is playing the games.

  • Small group instruction with students exhibiting the same areas of need.


Step 66

Step 6

6. Create and implement plans to close the gap.

  • Manipulatives to demonstrate thinking

  • Math fact folders

  • Math fluency games

  • Students explaining mental strategies

  • Apply facts to word problems

  • Provide challenges and extra support to meet students’ needs.

  • Timed tests (3 min.)


Step 67

Step 6

6. Create and implement plans to close the gap.

  • Progress monitor on a regular basis to determine the effectiveness of instruction

    • Use the 1:1 interview with the combination cards for combination knowledge

    • Use a the same or similar timed math handout to check for fluency.

    • Use observational notes to track how the problem is solved (using fingers, know, count on, or making 10).

  • If instruction is ineffective:

    • Check to ensure that the foundational knowledge of the skill prior to the skill being worked on is mastered. (Too high of an entry point?)

    • More time? More support (1:1)? Smaller group?


Step 68

Step 6

6. Create and implement plans to close the gap.

  • By class…organize and analyze data to determine small groups

  • What are some ways you could display the class data based on the sample assessment?

  • What would be the headings at the top?


Beyond the data retreat

Step 6

6. Create and implement plans to close the gap.

  • By class

Color coding data make them easy to read and interpret.

Assessment for Learning

www.edweb.net/assessment


Beyond the data retreat

Ancient Civilizations

Example

Social Studies


Steps 1 2

Steps 1 & 2

A more comprehensive approach:

Let’s look at a pre-test given at the beginning of the year to determine which strands will need to be examined most closely with the whole class.

This pre-test will also be used to determine which students may need differentiated instruction or additional supports within the classroom.


Step 33

Step 3

3. Administer the exam

Handout 2

LiveBinder


Step 34

Step 3

  • Using the answer sheet provided, respond to questions 1-26.

  • You will have 15 minutes to complete the exam.

  • Work alone and answer each question to the best of your ability.

  • After you have answered question 26 STOP. Do not proceed any further.

  • Remember, this is a pre-test. It is designed to measure your content knowledge before instruction has taken place.

  • Does anyone have any questions?

  • Begin.


Beyond the data retreat

Step 4

4. Organize the data

Current South Dakota Middle School Social Studies Strands

Strands Identified in the 6th Grade Social Studies Exam

History

Geography and Environmental Literacy

Civics and Government

Economics

Culture

  • U. S. History

  • World History

  • Geography

  • Civics (Government)

  • Economics


Step 42

Step 4

Handout 3

4. Organize the data


Step 43

Step 4

  • Using the key at the end of the exam (pages 1 and 2) correct your exam.


Step 58

Step 5

5. Evaluate the data to determine strengths and areas of need.

Using the Social Studies Data Worksheet, place a check mark in each corresponding cell to indicate both the number and primary strand for each incorrect answer.


Step 59

Step 5

  • 5. Evaluate the data to determine strengths and areas of need.

  • Assemble into groups of five.

  • Working with your partners, use your completed worksheets to analyze your test results.

    • Assuming your 5 person team is a class, identify your strengths and weaknesses as a class.

    • Identify strengths and weaknesses of each team member. Are there individual students who will need differentiated instruction?

    • In which strands will individual students require differentiated instruction?

    • Are there multiple students in your class with the same area(s) of need?


Step 510

Step 5

In what other ways might you

organize the data?

  • History

  • Time Period

  • Location

  • Geography

  • Agriculture

  • Travel

  • Culture

  • ?

  • Civics and Government

  • ?

  • Economics

  • ?


Step 69

Step 6

6. Create and implement plans to close the gap.

  • How will you plan for instruction?

  • What are the implications for whole class instruction?

  • What additional supports might be needed for some students?

  • What will you do to ensure growth for students who have already mastered portions of the curriculum?


Instructionally useful

Instructionally Useful?

  • Significance

    • Measures students’ attainment of a worthwhile aim

  • Teachability

    • Measures something teachable

    • If a teacher delivers reasonably effective instruction aimed at the test’s assessment targets, students should be able to master what the test measures.

  • Describability

    • Directly based on clear descriptions of the skills and knowledge it measures.

  • Reportability

    • Results are reported at a specific enough level to inform teachers about he effectiveness of the instruction they provide

  • Nonintrusiveness

    • Shouldn’t take too long to administer


Beyond the data retreat

Example – ELA

Speaking/Listening – Oral Presentation

Presentation of Knowledge and Skills


Step 13

Step 1

1. Clarify the Learning Target

  • Brainstorm what makes a good oral presentation.

  • Do a shout-out

  • I’ll record on chart paper


Step 14

Step 1

Grade 6 Grade 7 Grade 8

Grade 9-10 Grade 11-12


Step 1 2

Step 1 & 2

  • Clarify the learning target.

  • Determine the format and purpose.

Seven Strategies of Assessment for Learning

By Richard Stiggins

# 5 – Design lessons to focus on one learning target or aspect of quality at a time.

Handout 4


Step 24

Step 2

2. Determine the format and purpose

  • We have always had students doing a speech, art project, dribbling basketball across the court, science labs, theater, music production.

  • A rubric is an appropriate assessment method for many of the learning targets in the CCSS.


Step 1 21

Step 1 & 2

  • Clarify the learning target.

  • Determine the format and purpose.

Handout 5


Step 35

Step 3

3. Administer the assessment

  • What makes a good oral presentation?

  • Watch the videos

  • Score each student using only the “Delivery” rubric.


Step 36

Step 3

3. Administer the assessment

  • Clip 1 http://vimeo.com/45083980 1.1

  • Clip 2 http://vimeo.com/45083979 1.7

  • Clip 3 http://vimeo.com/45084245 .59

  • Clip 4 http://vimeo.com/45084244 .36

Hawaii DOE: Facilitation Gide and Materials for College and Career Readiness: Protocol #1

http://standardstoolkit.k12.hi.us/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/CCR.Ele_.Protocol_1.Facilitators-Guide.pdf


Step 4 5

Step 4 & 5

  • Organize the data

  • Evaluate the data to determine strengths and areas of need

What rating did you give speech #1?

Clip 1 http://vimeo.com/45083980


Step 4 51

Step 4 & 5

  • Organize the data

  • Evaluate the data to determine strengths and areas of need

  • In pairs or groups of three, compare you rubric ratings.

  • How difficult was it to focus on only one aspect or quality at a time?


Step 4 52

Step 4 & 5

  • Organize the data

  • Evaluate the data to determine strengths and areas of need

  • In pairs or groups of three, compare you rubric ratings.

  • How difficult was it to focus on only one aspect or quality at a time?


Step 4 53

Step 4 & 5

  • Organize the data

  • Evaluate the data to determine strengths and areas of need

What rating did you give speech #2?

Clip 2 http://vimeo.com/45083979


Step 4 54

Step 4 & 5

  • Organize the data

  • Evaluate the data to determine strengths and areas of need

  • Clip 3 http://vimeo.com/45084245 .59

  • Clip 4 http://vimeo.com/45084244 .36

Hawaii DOE: Facilitation Gide and Materials for College and Career Readiness: Protocol #1

http://standardstoolkit.k12.hi.us/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/CCR.Ele_.Protocol_1.Facilitators-Guide.pdf


Step 610

Step 6

6. Create and implement plans to close the gap.

  • Determine where to go next if this data (4 kids) were your class.

    • Brainstorm strategies that will help move the student, small group or class forward. (whole group, small group, 1:1 instruction needs)

  • With the lowest achieving student, determine where to go next in moving him/her to the next step toward mastery.

    • Brainstorm strategies that will help him/her develop the skills s/he needs.

  • How might you involve students in determining their next steps?


Performance assessment

Performance Assessment

  • Recognize that children can express what they know and can do in many different ways.

  • Evaluate progress as well as performance.

  • Involve children in the process of assessing their own growth.

  • Contribute to meaningful curriculum planning and the design of appropriate interventions.

  • Give parents specific, direct, and understandable information about their child.


Assessment tools

Assessment Tools

  • Artwork

  • Book

  • Cartoons

  • Charts

  • Computerized tools

  • Conversation

  • Demonstration

  • Debates

  • Every person responds techniques

  • Exit slips

  • Jigsaw

  • Lab experiments

  • Models

  • Murals

  • Newspapers

  • Partner share

  • Patterns

  • Posters

  • Powerpoint

  • Projects

  • Puzzles

  • Reports

  • Speeches

  • Story Telling

  • Whiteboards


Performance assessment1

Performance Assessment

  • Think about areas in your content/grade level that a performance assessment might be used?

  • Which ONE aspect of quality would you choose to focus on first?


Beyond the data retreat

  • YouTube

  • Boy Gives Terrible Speech (ands – unprepared)

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bTKuyk5A7wQ&feature=related

  • My Oral Presentation – A day in my life – Clara (Ums)

  • https://exchange.tie.net/exchweb/bin/redir.asp?URL=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jVfG3a46VY0

  • Oral Presentation Part 1 – looking at notes (practicing)

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tgJJle3--q0&feature=related

  • Bad Presentation - Two Boys (reading notes


Beyond the data retreat

Your Turn!

(Train the Trainer)

Vocabulary - Affixes


Beyond the data retreat

You Do

Handout 6


You do

You Do

  • Using the Vocabulary – Affixes assessment provided, follow the six steps of the formative assessment cycle to:

    • Analyze and organize the data

    • Determine strengths and areas of need

    • Plan for support

  • Be prepared to share

    • How you organized the data

    • Your plans to close any gaps that

      indicate a lack of mastery by students


Beyond the data retreat

Your

Turn!

Your Classroom Assessment


Beyond the data retreat

You Do

Your

Classroom

Assessment


Beyond the data retreat

You Do

Handout 7


You do1

You Do

  • Utilizing an assessment you use to measure learning in your classroom, follow all six steps of the formative assessment cycle to:

    • Evaluate and organize the data

    • Determine strengths and areas of need

    • Plan for support


Lessons learned

Lessons Learned


Beyond the data retreat

What really counts is what happens after the assessments.” “…what matters most with formative assessments is how students and teachers use the results.”

Thomas R. Guskey


The rest of the story

The Rest of the Story…

Students need a structured classroom process to help them use formative assessment results to improve their mastery of concepts and skills.


Essential characteristics

Essential Characteristics

  • Present the concepts differently

    • The initial instruction was unsuccessful

    • Doing the same thing a second time is not likely to yield different results

  • Engage students differently in learning

    • Consider different modalities or learning styles

    • Students should be engaged in qualitatively different activities/methods from those that took place during initial instruction

  • Provide students with successful learning experiences

    • If the instruction does not result in increased achievement for the student, move on to something else


Types of corrective activities

Types of Corrective activities

  • Can be divided into three groups

    • Those done with the teacher

    • Those done with a peer

    • Those done by oneself


Beyond the data retreat

  • Number from 1 – 11

  • Partner with the person(s) having the same number as you

  • Be prepared to explain the rule in detail to the entire group

    • Include an original scenario of how the activity might look within a particular content area


Beyond the data retreat

  • Read and study the corrective activity that corresponds to your number

  • Reteaching

  • Individual tutoring

  • Peer tutoring

  • Cooperative teams

  • Textbooks

  • Alternative textbooks

  • Alternative materials, workbooks, or study guides

  • Academic games

  • Learning kits

  • Learning centers and laboratories

  • Computer activities


Beyond the data retreat

  • Be prepared to explain the rule in detail to the entire group

    • Include an original scenario of how the activity might look within a particular content area

    • Be sure your example reflects best practice

    • Be creative


What do you do

What Do You Do?

  • Some students know the material before you present it.

  • Formative assessments give you the data to verify the learning.

  • So what will you do with these students?


Don t be

Don’t be…

My teachers could easily have ridden with Jesse James for all the time they stole from me.

Richard Brautigan


What these students need

What these students need

  • Provide these students with meaningful enrichment experiences.

  • Make sure these experiences are challenging, of high interest to the student, and involve choice.

  • Problem solving

  • Higher level thinking skills

  • Activities requiring automatic responses

  • Logic and reasoning activities

  • Games


Beyond the data retreat

“As we pull out of these young people the best of their thinking, the best of their courage, as we develop their confidence. . . Then we will have people with a passion for learning.”

Andrew Young


A proper belief

A Proper Belief

Our job is to help kids believe they are capable learners


Beyond the data retreat

  • Thank you

  • Evaluation

  • Credit/CEU


  • Login