Ict 512 advanced web technologies
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ICT 512 - Advanced Web Technologies. Lecture 1: Introduction Shakeel A. Khoja. Course outline 1/2. * Current Web data standards o XML, XSL, XLink, DOM, SMIL o Processing XML documents o Deploying XML data * Current Web metadata standards

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Ict 512 advanced web technologies

ICT 512 - Advanced Web Technologies

Lecture 1: Introduction

Shakeel A. Khoja


Course outline 1 2

Course outline 1/2

* Current Web data standards

o XML, XSL, XLink, DOM, SMIL

o Processing XML documents

o Deploying XML data

* Current Web metadata standards

o RDF, RDF-SCHEMA

o Ontologies, Dublin Core

o Metadata processing

o Surfing the semantic web


Course outline 2 2

Course outline 2/2

* Hypertext Linking

o Open Hypermedia philosophy

o Hypertext history

o The Missing Link: problems and solutions

* Web Site Construction

o Hypermedia Engineering

o Hypermedia Development Methods

o Hypermedia Development Techniques

o Web Site Maintenance

o Case study

* Web Searching

o Information retrieval history

o Search engine algorithms

o Case studies: Harvest, Google.


Books and references

Books and references

Text Book: Munindar P. Singh and Michael N. Huhns, Service Oriented Computing Semantics, Processes, Agents, 2005, John Wiley.

Reference Books:

  • Leon Shklar and Rich Rosen, Web Application Architecture, 2nd Edition, JWI.

  • Rosenfeld L, Information Architecture for the World Wide Web, 2nd Edition, O'Reilly 2002

  • Deitel, Deitel and Goldberg, Internet and World Wide Web - How To Program, 3rd Edition, Prentice Hall 2004

  • Gerti Kappel, Birgit Proll, Siegfried Reich, Werner Retschitzegger, Web Engineering, JWI 2006

  • Various WWW sources


Assessment strategy

Assessment Strategy


Enter 21 st century

Enter 21st Century!


Our information landscape

Our Information Landscape

Image from: http://www.socialmedia.biz/images/masssocialmedia.png


The future of information

The Future of Information

Image from: http://novaspivack.typepad.com/nova_spivacks_weblog/metaweb_graph.JPG


What is 21st century business

What do you think?

What is 21st Century Business?

Buyers and sellers who are:

  • Effective Learners

  • Effective Collaborators

  • Effective Creators

Image from: http://www.uniquecare.org/Collaborate%20250.jpg


21st century learners

21st Century Learners:

  • Lifelong learners

  • Can learn how to learn

  • Independent learners

  • Metacognitive

  • Intrinsically motivated

  • Focus on self improvement

Image from: http://flickr.com/photos/akaicker/38149570/


21st century collaborators

21st Century Collaborators:

  • Are effective communicators.

  • Are socially and culturally aware.

  • Take responsibility for their role.

  • Are flexible.

Image from: http://flickr.com/photos/wainwright/351684037/.


21st century collaborators1

21st Century Collaborators:

  • Are able to delegate or share responsibility when necessary.

  • Are equally comfortable as either leaders or participants.

  • Appreciate and internalize the essential interdependence of being part of society.

Image from: http://flickr.com/photos/pedrosimoes7/1301014184/


21st century creators

21st Century Creators:

  • Effectively analyze and synthesize.

  • Originality, innovative and creative contributors to society.

  • “think outside the box”.

  • Systems thinkers.

  • Goal oriented and productive.

  • Demonstrate ethical responsibility.

Image from: http://flickr.com/photos/jimfrazier/525695141/


Why go global

Why Go Global?

  • “The World is Flat”

  • We are no longer bound by four walls of classroom

  • Authentic development experiences

Image from: http://www.csupomona.edu/~sfenglehart/%20Hst%20Images%20/Berlin%20Wall.JPEG


Why go global1

Why Go Global?

  • Learning (and life) is networked, digital, connected.

  • Create an authentic classroom environment.

Image from: http://www.psychologicalscience.org/observer/2006/0306/images/old_classroom.jpg


Why go global2

Why Go Global?

  • Power of networks

Screen Shot from: Chrissy Hellyer @ Teaching Sagittarian: http://teachingsagittarian.edublogs.org/


New interfaces

New Interfaces?

  • Tap into the energy that people are bringing through new interfaces.

Image from: http://flickr.com/photos/bigduke6/90086641/


The technology toolbox

The Technology Toolbox

  • How to pick the right tools for the job

Image from: http://flickr.com/photos/mamabarns/747588843/


The technology toolbox1

The Technology Toolbox


Toolbox blogs

ToolBox: Blogs

When to use a blog:

  • individual reflection seeking feedback

Grade 5 Student Blog: http://heejae.learnerblogs.org/


Toolbox blogs1

ToolBox: Blogs

Features of a blog:

  • Entries posted in consecutive order, newest on top

  • Comments from readers extend classroom learning

  • Personal journal

Grade 5 Student Blog: http://heejae.learnerblogs.org/


Toolboox wikis

ToolBoox: Wikis

When to use a wiki

  • collaborative knowledge building

Grade 6 Student Wiki: http://ancientafricah.wikispaces.com


Toolbox social networking

ToolBox: Social Networking

When to use Social Networks

  • Connecting students and teachers

Grade 4 Flat Classroom Project: http://connectedclassroom.ning.com/


Collaborative multimedia

Collaborative Multimedia

  • creative representation of ideas

Sample VoiceThread: http://voicethread.com/#home.b6073.i45532


Toolbox voip

ToolBox: VoIP

When to use VoIP

  • Communicating with personal learning network

  • Connecting on a personal level


Toolbox voip1

ToolBox: VoIP

Features of VOIP

  • Audio/video e-mail

  • Audio/video chat

  • Recording discussions

7th Grade YackPack


The ultimate goal

The Ultimate Goal

  • Learning anytime, anywhere.

  • Develop a global Personal Learning Network

  • Communicate, Connect and Collaborate

Image from: http://prblog.typepad.com/strategic_public_relation/images/2007/06/22/simple_social_network.png


Chapter 1 computing with services

Chapter 1:Computing with Services

Service-Oriented Computing: Semantics, Processes, Agents– Munindar P. Singh and Michael N. Huhns, Wiley, 2005


Highlights of this chapter

Service-Oriented Computing: Semantics, Processes, Agents - Munindar Singh and Michael Huhns

Highlights of this Chapter

  • Visions for the Web

  • Open Environments

  • Services Introduced

  • The Evolving Web

  • Standards Bodies


The web as it is

Service-Oriented Computing: Semantics, Processes, Agents - Munindar Singh and Michael Huhns

The Web As It Is

Not easy to program

  • Designed for people to get information

    • Focuses on visual display (as in HTML)

    • Lacks support for meaning

  • Supports low-level interactions

    • HTTP is stateless

    • Processing is client-server

    • Creates avoidable dependencies among what should be independent components


The web as it is becoming

Service-Oriented Computing: Semantics, Processes, Agents - Munindar Singh and Michael Huhns

The Web As It Is Becoming

  • Enable interactions autonomous, heterogeneous parties (information providers and users)

    • Go beyond visual display to capture meaning  Semantic Web

    • Support standardized interfaces  Web services

    • Support complex activities  processes

    • Support rich interactions among autonomous parties  agents


Historical view of services over the web

Service-Oriented Computing: Semantics, Processes, Agents - Munindar Singh and Michael Huhns

Historical View of Services over the Web


Viewpoints on services

Service-Oriented Computing: Semantics, Processes, Agents - Munindar Singh and Michael Huhns

Viewpoints on Services

  • Traditionally, a capability that is provided and exploited, often but not always remotely

    • Networking: bundle of bandwidth-type properties

    • Telecom: features (caller ID, forwarding)

    • Systems: operational functions (billing, storage); parceled up into operation-support systems

    • Web or Grid: Web pages or Grid resources

    • Wireless: Wireless access; messaging

  • By contrast, we treat services as resembling real-life services or business partners


What is a web service

Service-Oriented Computing: Semantics, Processes, Agents - Munindar Singh and Michael Huhns

What is a Web Service?

  • A piece of business logic accessible via the Internet using open standards (Microsoft)

  • Encapsulated, loosely coupled, contracted software functions, offered via standard protocols (DestiCorp)

  • A set of interfaces providing a standard means of interoperating between different software applications, running on a variety of platforms and frameworks (W3C)

    Our working definition: A service is functionality that can be engaged


Scope

Service-Oriented Computing: Semantics, Processes, Agents - Munindar Singh and Michael Huhns

Scope

Includes wherever Internet and Web technologies are employed

  • Internet

  • Intranet: network restricted within an enterprise

  • Extranet: private network restricted to selected enterprises

  • Virtual Private Network (VPN): a way to realize an intranet or extranet over the Internet


Service composition

Service-Oriented Computing: Semantics, Processes, Agents - Munindar Singh and Michael Huhns

Service Composition

  • Vision

    • Specify and provide services independently, hiding implementations

    • Use services in combination in novel ways

    • Going beyond the idea of a passive object

  • Obviously desirable and challenging

  • But is this what we want?

    • Can or should implementations be hidden?

    • What about organizational visibility?

    • How to assess risk? How to handle exceptions?


Applications of composable services

Service-Oriented Computing: Semantics, Processes, Agents - Munindar Singh and Michael Huhns

Applications of Composable Services

  • Portals

  • Legacy system interoperation

  • E-commerce

  • Virtual enterprises

  • Grid computing


Autonomy

Service-Oriented Computing: Semantics, Processes, Agents - Munindar Singh and Michael Huhns

Autonomy

Independence of business partners (users and organizations)

  • Political reasons

    • Ownership of resources

    • Control, especially of access privileges

    • Payments

  • Technical reasons

    • Opacity of systems with respect to key features, e.g., precommit in distributed databases


Heterogeneity

Service-Oriented Computing: Semantics, Processes, Agents - Munindar Singh and Michael Huhns

Heterogeneity

Independence of component designers and system architects

  • Political reasons

    • Ownership of resources

  • Technical reasons

    • Conceptual problems in integration

    • Fragility of integration

    • Difficult to guarantee behavior of integrated systems


Dynamism

Service-Oriented Computing: Semantics, Processes, Agents - Munindar Singh and Michael Huhns

Dynamism

  • Independence of system administrators

  • Needed because the parties change

    • Architecture and implementation

    • Behavior

    • Interactions

  • Make configurations dynamic to improve service quality and maintain flexibility


Locality how to handle the above

Service-Oriented Computing: Semantics, Processes, Agents - Munindar Singh and Michael Huhns

Locality: How to Handle the Above

  • Reduce sharing of data and metadata to reduce inconsistencies and anomalies

  • Reduce hard-coding, which reflects out-of-band agreements among programmers

    • Bind dynamically to components

    • Use standardized formats to express data

    • Express important knowledge as metadata

    • Use standardized languages to express metadata

  • Relax consistency constraints

    • Obtain remote knowledge only when needed

    • Correct rather than prevent violations of constraints: often feasible


System architectures centralized

Service-Oriented Computing: Semantics, Processes, Agents - Munindar Singh and Michael Huhns

System Architectures: Centralized

Terminal

3270

Terminal

Terminal

Terminal

Terminal

Mainframe

Terminal

Terminal

Terminal

Terminal

Terminal

Terminal


System architectures client server

Service-Oriented Computing: Semantics, Processes, Agents - Munindar Singh and Michael Huhns

System Architectures: Client-Server

Workstation

Client

PC

Client

PC

Client

PC

Client

E-Mail

Server

Web

Server

Database

Server

Master-Slave


System architectures peer to peer

Service-Oriented Computing: Semantics, Processes, Agents - Munindar Singh and Michael Huhns

System Architectures: Peer-to-Peer

Application

Application

Application

Application

E-Mail

System

Web

System

Database

System


System architectures cooperative

Service-Oriented Computing: Semantics, Processes, Agents - Munindar Singh and Michael Huhns

System Architectures: Cooperative

Agent

Application

Application

Application

Agent

Agent

Agent

Application

Agent

Agent

E-Mail

System

Agent

Agent

Database

System

Web

System

(Mediators, Proxies, Aides, Wrappers)


Chapter 1 summary

Service-Oriented Computing: Semantics, Processes, Agents - Munindar Singh and Michael Huhns

Chapter 1 Summary

  • Evolving perspectives on the Web

  • Evolutions in IT architectures

  • Open environments challenge some fundamental assumptions of computer science

    • Autonomy

    • Heterogeneity

    • Dynamism

  • Services, if understood correctly, can support IT in open environments


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