Time vs frequency september 21 1999 ron denton
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Time vs. Frequency September 21, 1999 Ron Denton PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Time vs. Frequency September 21, 1999 Ron Denton. Time Domain vs. Frequency Domain. What is the Time Domain ? How is the Time Domain Measured ? What is the Frequency Domain ? How is the Frequency Domain Measured ? What does this have to do with Vibration ? How are the two domains related ?.

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Time vs. Frequency September 21, 1999 Ron Denton

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Time vs frequency september 21 1999 ron denton

Time vs. FrequencySeptember 21, 1999Ron Denton


Time domain vs frequency domain

Time Domain vs. Frequency Domain

  • What is the Time Domain ?

  • How is the Time Domain Measured ?

  • What is the Frequency Domain ?

  • How is the Frequency Domain Measured ?

  • What does this have to do with Vibration ?

  • How are the two domains related ?


The time domain for our use is

The Time Domain (for our use) is . . .

  • A graphical representation of the change of some value with respect to time


How the time domain is measured

How the Time Domain is Measured


The frequency domain for our use is

The Frequency Domain (for our use) is . . . .

  • A graphical representation of the amount of energy present in a signal at each of many frequencies


The frequency domain amplitude is usually measured in rms or peak

The Frequency Domain amplitude is usually measured in RMS or Peak

  • The frequency domain values are really just a series of sinusoidal equivalents, so amplitudes are usually represented the same as in the time domain.

  • The frequency domain is usually derived by computing a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of a time domain signal.


What does this have to do with vibration

What does this have to do with Vibration ?

  • Transducers, such as accelerometers, convert mechanical energy into electrical signals

  • The electrical signals are measured with various devices

  • Most of these devices record the time data

  • The time data is converted to the frequency domain within these devices

  • Vibration analysts use the time and frequency domain data to interpret machinery condition


The time and frequency domains are related by

The Time and Frequency Domains are related by . . . .

Amplitude

Time Domain

Frequency Domain


Sinusoidal signal examples

Sinusoidal Signal Examples


Sinusoidal signal examples1

Sinusoidal Signal Examples


Sinusoidal signal examples2

Sinusoidal Signal Examples


Sinusoidal signal examples3

Sinusoidal Signal Examples


Sinusoidal signal examples4

Sinusoidal Signal Examples


Sinusoidal signal examples5

Sinusoidal Signal Examples


These examples illustrate that

These examples illustrate that . . .

  • The time and frequency domains are related

  • A sinusoid in the time domain has a unique value in the frequency domain

  • Complex combinations of time domain sinusoids can be separated and displayed in the frequency domain

  • Signals other than sinusoids can be represented in the frequency domain accurately


A practical example to wrap up

A practical example to wrap up

  • A customer is using an accelerometer to measure sinusoidal vibration . . . . .

  • You receive a phone call . . . . .

  • “Your accelerometer is all out of whack! I have a simple signal and your accelerometer is generating all kinds of harmonics.”

  • You look around and can’t find an application engineer . . .

  • (Panic grips you !) What do you do ?


A practical example to wrap up1

A practical example to wrap up

  • Tell them to check the gain range (amplifier setting) on their equipment !

  • Their time domain signal probably looks like this . . .


A practical example to wrap up2

A practical example to wrap up

If the amplifier range of the measuring system is not set correctly, it will “clip” the signal and “chop off” the highest and lowest parts of the signal.

This is not good !

It means you are trying to turn a sine wave into a square wave.


Clipping time signals will cause a penalty and cost you data

Clipping Time signals will cause a penalty and cost you data

Just as clipping is illegal in football -in data acquisition, clipping the time data will cost you by causing invalid data (spurious signals) in the frequency spectrum.

Original Signal

Attenuated Signal

Spurious Signals Added


The moral of the example

The moral of the example ?

  • Don’t be a square !


Time vs frequency september 21 1999 ron denton

Questions ?


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