Residential students and ecology
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Residential Students and Ecology. BRENDAN GREANEY and SHANNON L. NORTON. Overview. Gender Neutral Housing Non-traditional Housing Sustainability “Green” Housing New Amenities in Housing How these relate to ecology?. GOALS. Gain insight on four big trends in campus housing

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Residential Students and Ecology

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Residential students and ecology

Residential Students and Ecology

BRENDAN GREANEY

and

SHANNON L. NORTON


Overview

Overview

  • Gender Neutral Housing

  • Non-traditional Housing

  • Sustainability “Green” Housing

  • New Amenities in Housing

  • How these relate to ecology?


Goals

GOALS

  • Gain insight on four big trends in campus housing

  • Discuss pros and cons of these trends

  • Relate them to campus ecology


Gender neutral housing

Gender Neutral Housing

Trend started in 2006 with the National Genderblind Student Campaign

Sought to offer gendergender neutral housing options primarily for transgender & gay/lesbian students.


Pros of gender neutral housing

Pros of Gender Neutral Housing

  • Easy to integrate into existing housing complexes

  • Students can opt in or our of gender neutral housing

  • Easy to integrate on a larger scale with new buildings


Cons of gender neutral housing

Cons of Gender Neutral Housing

  • Hard to integrate into Greek housing

  • Can be a difficult education process with administration and parents.


Non traditional housing

Non-traditional Housing

  • Non-traditional includes undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate students.

  • Becoming a big trend in higher education as displaced workers are returning to college and more undergrads are matriculating to graduate school due to lack of career options.


Pros of non traditional housing

Pros of Non-traditional Housing

  • Can attract these students to on-campus housing.

  • Offers affordable on-campus housing option.

  • Allows students with families options for on-campus housing.


Cons of non traditional housing

Cons of Non-traditional Housing

  • Can be difficult to integrate into existing facilities as it requires more space.

  • Facilities will sacrifice beds to accommodate larger, apartment-like layouts.

  • Can be a small, niche-like population.


Sustainable green housing

Sustainable “Green” Housing

LEEDS (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) buildings

Environmental living and learning communities

Energy and water conservation

Recycling


Pros of sustainable housing

Pros of Sustainable Housing

Save money over the long run

Conserve resources and the environment

Create habits to carry throughout life

Educate the residential community as well as entire campus and local community


Cons of sustainable housing

Cons of Sustainable Housing

Higher up-front costs

Only approximately 20 percent of students come to campus with ecological mindset

Need dedication from entire campus and community for complete success

Need strong educational component for success


New amenities in housing

New Amenities in Housing

Students have higher expectations of residential housing

90% of first-year students have never shared a room

Students want privacy, security, kitchens, game rooms, pools, internet and electronic access

Learning communities


Pros of new amenities

Pros of New Amenities

Retain students in on-campus housing

Promote community and social interaction

Makes day to day activities more convenient

Increase overall college retention and graduation rates

Increased academic support


Cons of new amenities

Cons of New Amenities

More expensive to live on-campus

Learning communities may limit diverse interactions

Limited opportunities to live near or with friends

May create environment that students never want to leave


Group activity

Group Activity

Break into Four groups

1. Gender Neutral Housing

2. Non-tradition Housing

3. Sustainable “Green” Housing

4. New Amenities in Housing

Each Group will answer the following questions?

How would you implement this new housing type into Wright State Campus?

Would you use current facilities? Renovate?

How would you incorporate new facilities?

How would you foster the success and development of these communities?


How these relate to ecology

How These Relate to Ecology

  • Attractive residential housing will increase enrollment

  • Campus planning needs to keep these trends in mind when developing

  • Faculty and staff need to work together to create an overall environment for learning

  • Address the theory of “meeting students where they are”


Questions

QUESTIONS?


Residential students and ecology

References

Abramson, P. (2010). Living on campus 2010 college housing report: More than just beds, new residence halls offer amenities and sustainability, College Planning and ManagementMagazine, Special Report. Retrieved from EBSCO host.

Agron, J. (2003). Close to home. American School & University, 75(10), 58. Retrieved from EBSCOhost

Agron, J. (2004). Taking up residence. American School & University, 76(11), 28B-28H.

Retrieved from EBSCO host.

Agron, J. (2007). 18th annual residence hall construction report. American School & University, 79(11), 42-45. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.

Angelo, J., & Rivard, N. (2003). If you build it, will they come?. University Business, 6(5), 24. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.


Residential students and ecology

Dunkel, N. W. (2009). Green residence halls are here: Current trends in sustainable campus

housing. Journal of College & University Student Housing, 36(1), 10-23. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.

Kennedy, M. (2002). Trends shaping housing design. American School & University, 74(5), 34. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.

LaNasa, S., Olson, E., & Alleman, N. (2007). The impact of on-campus student growth on first year student engagement and success. Research in Higher Education, 48(8), 941-966. doi:10.1007/s11162-007-9056-5

Li, Y., Sheely II, M. C., & Whalen, D. F. (2005). Contributors to residence hall student retention:Why do students choose to leave or stay?. Journal of College & University StudentHousing, 33(2), 28-36. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.

McCluskey-Titus, P. (2009). Letter from the editor. Journal of College & University StudentHousing, 36(1), 6-9. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.

On-campus living. (2006). American School & University, 79(1), 18. Retrieved from

EBSCOhost.


Residential students and ecology

Pellow, J. P., & Anand, B. (2009). The greening of a university. Change, 41(5), 8-15. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.

Shimm, J. (2001). Sustainable campus housing. American School & University, 73(12), 142.

Retrieved from EBSCOhost.

Stassen, M. A. (2003). Student Outcomes: The impact of varying living-learning community

models. Research in Higher Education, 44(5), 581. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.

Whiteman, D. (2009). Creating a "Green Bubble" on campus: A model for programming in a green living-learning community. Journal of College & University Student Housing,

36(1), 38-47. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.


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