Slide1 l.jpg
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 17

The Christian Roman Empire & the Rise of the Just War Tradition PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 62 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

The Christian Roman Empire & the Rise of the Just War Tradition. The Christian Roman Empire & the Rise of the Just War Tradition I. Context: Changed Circumstances of the “Christian” Roman Empire. The Christian Roman Empire & the Rise of the Just War Tradition

Download Presentation

The Christian Roman Empire & the Rise of the Just War Tradition

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Slide1 l.jpg

The Christian Roman Empire & the Rise of the Just War Tradition


Slide2 l.jpg

The Christian Roman Empire & the Rise of the Just War Tradition

I. Context: Changed Circumstances of the “Christian” Roman Empire


Slide3 l.jpg

The Christian Roman Empire & the Rise of the Just War Tradition

I. Context: Changed Circumstances of the “Christian” Roman Empire

A. 2 Examples:


Slide4 l.jpg

The Christian Roman Empire & the Rise of the Just War Tradition

I. Context: Changed Circumstances of the “Christian” Roman Empire

A. 2 Examples:

1. The Battle of the Frigidus (394): Theodosius’s Victory over Eugenius


Slide5 l.jpg

“This happened, in fact, during the latest war. Faithless and sacriligeous men challenged one who placed his trust in the Lord. They attempted to deprive him of his dominion and they threatened the churches of the Lord with savage persecutions. Suddenly a wind sprang up; it ripped the rebels’ shields out of their hands and cast all the javelins and missiles back on the sinner’s army. Their opponents had not yet attacked but already they could not sustain the assault of the wind and were cut down by their own weapons. What is more…they lost heart when they realized that God was fighting against them.

They had gone forth with a challenge; from the quivers of their hearts they had drawn the poisoned arrows of infidelity against the Christian people. They their impiety was turned back on their own heads. Their unfaithfulness caused divisions among themselves. The Lord broke up the trap they had laid for his faithful ones. Thus not only were they unable to harm the devout but they were deprived of their own auxiliaries & their support went over to their opponent.

How much better it would have been if they had never unsheathed the sword, had never uttered the irreverent words…”

-Ambrose, Exposition of Psalm 35, 25


Slide6 l.jpg

Theodosius, the winner of the battle, became the last emperor of a unified Roman Empire.

Eugenius on a coin. The Western ruler was taken prisoner after the battle, executed, and his head was displayed in Theodosius' camp.


Slide7 l.jpg

The Christian Roman Empire & the Rise of the Just War Tradition

I. Context: Changed Circumstances of the “Christian” Roman Empire

A. 2 Examples:

1. The Battle of the Frigidus (394): Theodosius’s Victory over Eugenius

2. Augustine & Boniface, governor of North Africa


Slide8 l.jpg

The Christian Roman Empire & the Rise of the Just War Tradition

I. Context: Changed Circumstances of the “Christian” Roman Empire

A. 2 Examples:

1. The Battle of the Frigidus (394): Theodosius’s Victory over Eugenius

2. Augustine & Boniface, governor of North Africa

B. Significance


Slide9 l.jpg

The Christian Roman Empire & the Rise of the Just War Tradition

I. Context: Changed Circumstances of the “Christian” Roman Empire

A. 2 Examples:

1. The Battle of the Frigidus (394): Theodosius’s Victory over Eugenius

2. Augustine & Boniface, governor of North Africa

B. Significance

II. Development of Just War Tradition


Slide10 l.jpg

The Christian Roman Empire & the Rise of the Just War Tradition

I. Context: Changed Circumstances of the “Christian” Roman Empire

A. 2 Examples:

1. The Battle of the Frigidus (394): Theodosius’s Victory over Eugenius

2. Augustine & Boniface, governor of North Africa

B. Significance

II. Development of Just War Tradition

A. Criteria for Just War or Use of Force (Jus ad bellum)


Slide11 l.jpg

  • Criteria for Just War or Use of Force (Jus ad bellum)

  • Legitimate authority

  • Just cause

  • Right intention

  • Reasonable hope of success

  • War as the best available means to right or prevent a grievous wrong.


Slide12 l.jpg

The Christian Roman Empire & the Rise of the Just War Tradition

I. Context: Changed Circumstances of the “Christian” Roman Empire

A. 2 Examples:

1. The Battle of the Frigidus (394): Theodosius’s Victory over Eugenius

2. Augustine & Boniface, governor of North Africa

B. Significance

II. Development of Just War Tradition

A. Criteria for Just War or Use of Force (Jus ad bellum)

B. Background: Cicero (106-43 BCE)


Slide13 l.jpg

The Christian Roman Empire & the Rise of the Just War Tradition

I. Context: Changed Circumstances of the “Christian” Roman Empire

A. 2 Examples:

1. The Battle of the Frigidus (394): Theodosius’s Victory over Eugenius

2. Augustine & Boniface, governor of North Africa

B. Significance

II. Development of Just War Tradition

A. Criteria for Just War or Use of Force (Jus ad bellum)

B. Background: Cicero (106-43 BCE)

C. Ambrose of Milan & Augustine of Hippo


Slide14 l.jpg

"He who does not keep harm off a friend, if he can, is as much in fault as he who causes it."

Ambrose, De officiis


Slide15 l.jpg

The Christian Roman Empire & the Rise of the Just War Tradition

I. Context: Changed Circumstances of the “Christian” Roman Empire

A. 2 Examples:

1. The Battle of the Frigidus (394): Theodosius’s Victory over Eugenius

2. Augustine & Boniface, governor of North Africa

B. Significance

II. Development of Just War Tradition

A. Criteria for Just War or Use of Force (Jus ad bellum)

B. Background: Cicero (106-43 BCE)

C. Ambrose of Milan & Augustine of Hippo

1. Augustine’s Against Faustus


Slide16 l.jpg

The Christian Roman Empire & the Rise of the Just War Tradition

I. Context: Changed Circumstances of the “Christian” Roman Empire

A. 2 Examples:

1. The Battle of the Frigidus (394): Theodosius’s Victory over Eugenius

2. Augustine & Boniface, governor of North Africa

B. Significance

II. Development of Just War Tradition

A. Criteria for Just War or Use of Force (Jus ad bellum)

B. Background: Cicero (106-43 BCE)

C. Ambrose of Milan & Augustine of Hippo

1. Augustine’s Against Faustus

2. Augustine’s City of God


Slide17 l.jpg

The Christian Roman Empire & the Rise of the Just War Tradition

I. Context: Changed Circumstances of the “Christian” Roman Empire

A. 2 Examples:

1. The Battle of the Frigidus (394): Theodosius’s Victory over Eugenius

2. Augustine & Boniface, governor of North Africa

B. Significance

II. Development of Just War Tradition

A. Criteria for Just War or Use of Force (Jus ad bellum)

B. Background: Cicero (106-43 BCE)

C. Ambrose of Milan & Augustine of Hippo

1. Augustine’s Against Faustus

2. Augustine’s City of God

Concluding Thoughts


  • Login