Essential Science Concepts For Exit-Level TAKS: Hands-On Activities for Supporting Student Success James W. Collins S
Download

Essential Science Concepts For Exit-Level TAKS: Hands-On Activities for S...

Advertisement
Download Presentation
Comments
page
From:
|  
(456) |   (0) |   (0)
Views: 28 | Added: 04-09-2012
Rate Presentation: 0 0
Description:

Essential Science Concepts For Exit-Level TAKS: Hands-On A...

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use only and may not be sold or licensed nor shared on other sites. SlideServe reserves the right to change this policy at anytime. While downloading, If for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.











- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -




1. 1 Essential Science Concepts For Exit-Level TAKS: Hands-On Activities for Supporting Student Success James W. Collins Senior Science Program Coordinator Barbara Taylor Senior Science Program Coordinator Summer 2008

2. 2

3. 3

4. 4

5. 5

6. 6

7. 7 The August 2004 TAKS Information Booklet: Science, Grade 11 Exit Level from the Texas Education Agency?s Student Assessment Division lists the five TAKS science objectives as the following: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of science. The student will demonstrate an understanding of the organization of living systems. The student will demonstrate an understanding of the interdependence of organisms and the environment. The student will demonstrate an understanding of the structures and properties of matter. The student will demonstrate an understanding of motion, forces, and energy. Our Biology and IPC modules cover the following TAKS objectives and TEKS knowledge and student expectations statements. Each activity includes the full text of the relevant TEKS knowledge and skills and student expectation statements. The August 2004 TAKS Information Booklet: Science, Grade 11 Exit Level from the Texas Education Agency?s Student Assessment Division lists the five TAKS science objectives as the following: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of science. The student will demonstrate an understanding of the organization of living systems. The student will demonstrate an understanding of the interdependence of organisms and the environment. The student will demonstrate an understanding of the structures and properties of matter. The student will demonstrate an understanding of motion, forces, and energy. Our Biology and IPC modules cover the following TAKS objectives and TEKS knowledge and student expectations statements. Each activity includes the full text of the relevant TEKS knowledge and skills and student expectation statements.

8. 8

9. 9

10. 10 The first question (listed in the guide to student responses in the teacher pages and in the procedures section in the student pages) is always the focus question. Each activity has a focus question, which is a TAKS-like science question that is open-ended - that is, generally we provide no multiple-choice options to the students. The focus question is followed by the other student questions, which may ask students to complete tables, interpret graphs, construct graphs, solve formulas, make simple drawings, and so on. The questions are designed to get students to fully engage with the activity and reinforce the science concepts and processes hat they are reviewing.The first question (listed in the guide to student responses in the teacher pages and in the procedures section in the student pages) is always the focus question. Each activity has a focus question, which is a TAKS-like science question that is open-ended - that is, generally we provide no multiple-choice options to the students. The focus question is followed by the other student questions, which may ask students to complete tables, interpret graphs, construct graphs, solve formulas, make simple drawings, and so on. The questions are designed to get students to fully engage with the activity and reinforce the science concepts and processes hat they are reviewing.

11. 11 As part of the station set up, you will tape a copy of the station information sheet at each station and make a copy of the station information sheet for the students to put in their study folder (described above in ?How should students move through the activities??) The station information sheet is a one-page visual of what the station should look like when properly set up for the students. It includes images of all the materials that should be present at the station, and how those materials should be set up. It is designed both for the teacher to use to set up the station, and for the students moving from activity to activity to use to make sure the station remains set up correctly after the previous group of students is done with it. The station mat is a tool that students can use to arrange certain materials at the station. Not every station activity has a station mat. IPC Station 7(D): Chemical Behavior and the Periodic Table has a station mat that organizes the before and after test tubes and petri dishes used in the activity. [Other materials, such as cards, data tables, images, etc., necessary for students to conduct the station activity] As part of the station set up, you will tape a copy of the station information sheet at each station and make a copy of the station information sheet for the students to put in their study folder (described above in ?How should students move through the activities??) The station information sheet is a one-page visual of what the station should look like when properly set up for the students. It includes images of all the materials that should be present at the station, and how those materials should be set up. It is designed both for the teacher to use to set up the station, and for the students moving from activity to activity to use to make sure the station remains set up correctly after the previous group of students is done with it. The station mat is a tool that students can use to arrange certain materials at the station. Not every station activity has a station mat. IPC Station 7(D): Chemical Behavior and the Periodic Table has a station mat that organizes the before and after test tubes and petri dishes used in the activity. [Other materials, such as cards, data tables, images, etc., necessary for students to conduct the station activity]

12. 12 Each station activity also calls for a TAKS question card that shows one of the released exit-level questions that relates to the concept reviewed at the station. The advance preparation section of the teacher pages for each activity has the teacher prepare this card. In that section, we reference an appropriate question so that the teacher can obtain the question from the Texas Education Agency website and print it in advance. The steps in the question card section of the student pages are always the same. I Need to Remember This section appears only in the student pages and is always the same. It is to be completed after the class discussion of the station, and is designed to capture the students? notes about what science concepts and processes they need to retain from this activity and post-activity discussion. Each station activity also calls for a TAKS question card that shows one of the released exit-level questions that relates to the concept reviewed at the station. The advance preparation section of the teacher pages for each activity has the teacher prepare this card. In that section, we reference an appropriate question so that the teacher can obtain the question from the Texas Education Agency website and print it in advance. The steps in the question card section of the student pages are always the same. I Need to Remember This section appears only in the student pages and is always the same. It is to be completed after the class discussion of the station, and is designed to capture the students? notes about what science concepts and processes they need to retain from this activity and post-activity discussion.

13. 13

14. 14

15. 15

16. 16

17. 17 Overview of the Activities

18. 18

19. 19

20. 20

21. 21

22. 22

23. 23

24. 24

25. 25

26. 26

27. 27

28. 28

29. 29

30. 30

31. 31

32. 32

33. 33

34. 34

35. 35

36. 36

37. 37

38. 38

39. 39

40. 40

41. 41

42. 42

43. 43

44. 44

45. 45

46. 46

47. 47

48. 48

49. 49

50. 50

51. 51 Before you begin the activity Remove any plates, napkins, etc., from your table. Place your notebooks around the perimeter of the room, not on the tables. Please do not take the student pages from one station to the next.

52. 52

53. 53

54. 54 Create a Word Wall As students work through each activity, they may encounter unfamiliar words that they will need help defining. Students should write the unfamiliar words on the Words I Need Help Understanding page at each station. Create a Word Wall using the words students identified at each station.

55. 55 Complete the Activities Read over each activity at this station and complete all parts of it. Think about how the activity can be used to ensure that students meet all the requirements of the TEKS.

56. 56

57. 57

58. 58

59. 59

60. 60

61. 61

62. 62

63. 63

64. 64

65. 65 Diagnostic Wall Chart Examine the sample Diagnostic Wall Chart. What can be determined from the chart about students? understanding of the science content required on the exit-level TAKS? Determine whether the TEKS content should be reviewed, reinforced, or retaught.

66. 66

67. 67 Debrief and interventions What information could be written on the ? I Need to Remember portion of the student pages to help students who are having difficulty with the concepts in the TEKS?

68. 68 Expectations and academic achievement How do teacher and student academic expectations affect student success? (Record your response on a post-it note.) Read pages 41-46 from Carol S. Dweck?s Improving Academic Achievement. (Record three important findings.)

69. 69 Personal reflection Silently reflect on the response you recorded on the post-it note before you read Dweck?s article.

70. 70

71. 71

72. 72

73. 73 Contact Information James W. Collins jwcollins@mail.utexas.edu Barbara Taylor barbara_taylor@mail.utexas.edu


Other Related Presentations

Copyright © 2014 SlideServe. All rights reserved | Powered By DigitalOfficePro