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Governance Options Part II. Teresa Vast Early Childhood Policy Consultant. Early Childhood Education Temporary Task Force Governance Working Group Meeting September 19, 2005. Overview . What are the essential functions of ECE system governance?

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governance options part ii

Governance OptionsPart II

Teresa Vast

Early Childhood Policy Consultant

Early Childhood Education Temporary Task Force

Governance Working Group Meeting

September 19, 2005

overview
Overview
  • What are the essential functions of ECE system governance?
  • What characteristics of a governance structure are essential?
  • What capacities are needed for an effective governance structure?
  • What is our current model? Are changes needed?
  • What should we know about various governance structures we are considering?
  • What are some pros and cons of each model for Hawaii?
  • Which models are most promising for Hawaii?
roles functions of governance
Roles & Functions of Governance
  • Develop and set policy
  • Generate resources
  • Allocate resources
  • Collaborate across systems
  • Develop and set standards
  • Monitor quality of programs, services
  • Provide technical assistance
  • Oversee evaluation of system performance

(Restated from 9/8 Governance Working Group meeting notes)

what are key characteristics needed in a governance structure
What are key characteristics needed in a governance structure?
  • Representative – involving those whose perspectives and expertise are needed to make effective decisions
  • Legitimate – regarded as a fair and appropriate locus for decision-making by those affected by the decisions made
  • Enduring – sustainable across changes in leadership
  • Effective and flexible – organized/structured for continuous improvement
  • Authoritative – capable of holding all elements of the system accountable to achieving their objectives

(Bruner, p. 10-11)

characteristics and capacities
Characteristics and Capacities
  • Ability to facilitate collaboration among all public and private players
  • Ability to attract & retain leaders with vision & passion
  • Authority to lead
  • Power to make decisions
  • Power to generate & control allocation of resources
  • Authority to ensure uniform data collection and reporting across systems

(Restated from 9/8 Governance Working Group meeting notes)

good beginnings coordinating structure act 77

Hawaii’s Current Model for ECE Collaboration

Good Beginnings Coordinating Structure/Act 77

Oahu

Good Beginnings

Community Council

Maui

Good Beginnings

Community Council

Hawaii

Good Beginnings

Community Council

Kauai

Good Beginnings

Community Council

Community

Initiatives

Community

Initiatives

Community

Initiatives

Community

Initiatives

Good

Beginnings

County

Coordinator

Good

Beginnings

County

Coordinator

Good

Beginnings

County

Coordinator

Good

Beginnings

County

Coordinator

GBA Advisory Group

Service integration/Coordination

Data Collection

Public Engagement

Finance/ Resource Development

Quality Assurance

EC Career Development Coalition

Kia’Ika ‘Ike (Director’s Group)

Good Beginnings Alliance

14 Member Board of Directors

Institutional and Individual Members

GBA Staff

Interdepartmental Council

8 Members

DOE, DHS, DOH, DLIR, DBEDT

Governor’s Office, Philanthropy, Business

GBA Standing

Committee

Personnel & Finance

School Readiness Taskforce

state level governance structures to consider for hawaii s ece system
State-Level Governance Structuresto Consider for Hawaii’s ECE System
  • Mandatory Coordination/Collaboration
  • Joint management by two or more departments
  • Consolidation of ECE programs/services in one existing department
  • Independent governmental entity dedicated to ECE
  • Quasi-governmental or public/private entity
  • Nonprofit entity dedicated to ECE
mandatory coordination collaboration
Mandatory Coordination/Collaboration
  • Separate departments responsible for different aspects of early care and education
  • Mechanism for cross-department coordination/collaboration, e.g. Children’s Cabinet

Examples: Delaware, Louisiana, Maryland, West Virginia

mandatory coordination collaboration9
Mandatory Coordination/Collaboration
  • Variants…
    • Authority to set standards
    • Produce a cross-dept children’s budget with prioritized funding recommendations
    • Pool funds
    • May disburse funds to support initiatives
    • Advisory board
    • Private sector representatives, parents may be included
    • May link to local governance entities or communities
mandatory coordination collaboration delaware
Mandatory Coordination/Collaboration: Delaware
  • Governance structure
    • Interagency Resource Management Committee:
      • Department heads approve budgets for ECE
    • Early Care and Education Office
      • Interagency office funded by three departments
    • Early Care and Education Council
      • Advisory group of private sector representatives
mandatory coordination collaboration delaware11
Mandatory Coordination/Collaboration: Delaware
  • Interagency Resource Management Committee
    • Department heads
      • Education; Services for Children, Youth, and Their Families; Health and Social Services; Budget Director and Controller General
      • Work Group: One representative from each of the departments of the Committee members
    • Approves budgets for early childhood programs
    • Fosters interagency coordination in service delivery

Established in statute, 1992

mandatory coordination collaboration delaware12
Mandatory Coordination/Collaboration: Delaware
  • Early Care and Education Office
    • Established under the auspices of the Interagency Resource Management Committee
    • Interagency office located in the Department of Education
    • Departments of Services for Children, Youth, and Their Families, Health and Social Services and Education each fund a staff position to support the work of the ECE Office

Established in statute, 2000

mandatory coordination collaboration delaware13
Mandatory Coordination/Collaboration: Delaware
  • Early Care and Education Council
    • 12 private sector members appointed by the IRMC
      • includes providers, parents, business, community, schools, Head Start
    • May establish subcommittees
    • Advises the IRMC concerning ECE services in the state; reports annually on status of its work
    • Staffed by DECEO, with support from IRMC agencies
    • Funded by the Department of Education

Established by executive order, 2002

mandatory coordination collaboration pros cons
Mandatory Coordination/Collaboration: Pros & Cons
  • Review & clarify pros & cons from 9/8 meeting
  • Additions/Revisions?
  • Most compelling pros & cons?
  • Remaining questions/issues?
  • Additional information needed?
mandatory coordination collaboration pros cons15
Mandatory Coordination/Collaboration: Pros & Cons
  • Pros
    • Utilizes infrastructure capabilities of separate departments
    • Builds on the potential of existing system
    • Adds leverage for different departments
    • Built on current system
    • Could link to current councils
mandatory coordination collaboration pros cons16
Mandatory Coordination/Collaboration: Pros & Cons
  • Cons
    • Cannot administer programs
    • Reduction of resources forces departments to pull back to core mission
    • If entity does not have staff, authority
    • May be too wimpy
    • Doesn’t answer the question of where early education is situated in state government
joint management by two departments
Joint management by two departments
  • Two agencies jointly fund and manage early care and education programs, e.g. departments of Human Services and Education
  • Variants
    • One agency may have a greater role
    • Coordination with other agencies
    • Coordination with private sector
    • May have linkages to local governance entities

State examples: Arkansas; Connecticut

joint management by two departments arkansas
Joint management by two departments: Arkansas
  • Department of Education
    • Funds and set standards for state’s pre-k program

(Arkansas Better Chance)

  • Division of Child Care and Early Childhood Education, Department of Human Services*
    • Responsible for diverse set of ECE services
    • Administers pre-k program

*Created in 1997 to enhance ECE coordination within state

joint management by two departments arkansas19
Joint management by two departments: Arkansas
  • Division of Child Care and Early Childhood Education
    • Child care licensing
    • Family support – child care assistance
    • Nutrition – USDA food programs
    • Training; CDA scholarships
    • Technical assistance; grants/loans; resource center for programs
    • Accreditation/approval system
    • Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems Initiative
    • Early Childhood Commission
      • Approves licensing standards; advises Division
    • Child care resource and referral for families
    • And more!
consolidation of ece programs services in one existing department
Consolidation of ECE programs/services in one existing department
  • Effort to improve collaboration across programs
  • Variants
    • May create an Office of Early Childhood within an existing department
    • Coordination with other agencies
    • Coordination with private sector
    • May have linkages to local governance entities

State examples: Florida; Maryland; Tennessee

consolidation of ece programs services in one existing department21
Consolidation of ECE programs/services in one existing department
  • Maryland
    • Created Early Childhood Development Division in Dept of Education
    • Legislature sought unified focus on development & education, birth to completion of high school
  • Florida
    • Created Office of Early Learning in Agency for Workforce Innovation
    • Legislature sought focus on private sector involvement in a 0-5 coordinated system separate from system of free public education
independent governmental entity dedicated to ece
Independent governmental entity dedicated to ECE
  • Establish independent office under Governor ….OR…
  • Consolidate all early care and education programs in a new, independent department
  • Establish a governance board for oversight
independent governmental entity dedicated to ece23
Independent governmental entity dedicated to ECE
  • Variants
    • Advisory board to include additional expertise
    • Coordination with other agencies to link with comprehensive services
    • Coordination with private sector
    • May have linkages to local governance entities

State examples: Georgia; Massachusetts; North Carolina

independent governmental entity dedicated to ece north carolina
Independent governmental entity dedicated to ECE: North Carolina
  • Office of School Readiness, Office of the Governor
    • State-level interagency public/private group sought an independent office that would not be subsumed by a department
      • Year-long governance planning
      • Decision for an office vs. new agency
    • OSR in governor’s office is first step toward goal
      • Next step – move it under the BOE, not DOE
    • Smart Start is key partner – retains private status
      • Community connections are a strength
      • “Keeps government in check”
quasi governmental or public private entity
Quasi-governmental or public/private entity

Examples:

  • Public Authority with private sector board members
    • Hawaii Tourism Authority
  • Hawaii Health Systems Corporation
    • Nonprofit public-private organization
  • Nonprofit corporation named in statute with appointed board members from public & private sectors
    • North Carolina Partnership for Children
  • State office with public-private board of trustees
    • South Carolina First Steps to School Readiness
quasi governmental public private entity hawaii tourism authority
Quasi-governmental/public-private entity: Hawaii Tourism Authority
  • Cabinet–level agency
    • Reports directly to Governor; Attached to DBEDT for administrative purposes
  • Policy-making board
    • Private sector representatives from all industry sub-sectors, business community, community-at-large
    • Public sector representatives
      • County appointees
      • Ex-officio: Directors of DBEDT, DLNR, Transportation
  • Dedicated revenue source: hotel tax (TAT)
  • Develops and implements policy & plans; administers programs; coordinates with public & private sectors
quasi governmental public private entity public private corporation
Quasi-governmental/public-private entity: Public-Private Corporation

NC Partnership for Children

  • State-level nonprofit corporation named & authorized in statute
    • Public-private board appointed by governor, legislature
    • Must follow laws of public meetings & public records; subject to annual state fiscal and performance audits
    • Receives state funds & state-allocated federal funds; raises private funds to required match (15%)
  • Implement Smart Start Initiative with local partnerships
  • Oversee and provide funds to county-level nonprofits (local partnerships)
quasi governmental public private entity state office w public private board
Quasi-governmental/public-private entity: State office w/public-private Board

South Carolina First Steps to School Readiness

  • Board of Trustees includes Governor, Superintendent of Education, legislators, department heads & 20 appointed private-sector members & parents
  • Office reports to Board, situated in Dept of Education
  • Receives state funds, raises private funds
  • Links with and provide funds to county-level nonprofit partnerships to carry out initiative
nonprofit entity dedicated to ece
Nonprofit entity dedicated to ECE
  • Receive public funds to fulfill a public purpose
  • Examples:
    • Los Angeles Universal Preschool
which governance model is best for hawaii s ece system
Which governance model is best for Hawaii’s ECE System?
  • What are the goals for the ECE system?
  • What governance functions are needed to achieve the goals?
  • What characteristics and capacities are needed to govern the system effectively?
  • What is our current model? Are changes needed?
  • What are the pros & cons of the various models?
  • What are the most promising models?
  • What are the remaining questions and issues?
  • Next steps to develop ECE governance structure for HI?
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