Tallahassee Childhood Obesity Prevention (COPE) Coalition
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Tallahassee Childhood Obesity Prevention (COPE) Coalition Logic Model. Assumptions The community will be motivated to become agents of change. Obesity is a community wide issue. Community/ External Agency partnerships will create sustainable environments for healthy children.

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Tallahassee Childhood Obesity Prevention (COPE) Coalition Logic Model

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Tallahassee childhood obesity prevention cope coalition logic model

Tallahassee Childhood Obesity Prevention (COPE) Coalition

Logic Model

  • Assumptions

  • The community will be motivated to become agents of change.

  • Obesity is a community wide issue.

  • Community/

  • External Agency partnerships will create sustainable environments for healthy children.

  • There is a genuine partnership among all key stakeholders.

  • Inputs

  • COPE Leadership Team ( FAMU, Fla. Family Network, FSU- Center on Better Health and Life for Underserved Populations, & Greater Frenchtown Revitalization Council)

  • COPE Coalition Administrative staff

  • Cope Consultants

  • Florida Blue Foundation

  • EMBRACE Leadership team

  • COPE Mighty 22 Mini- Grantees

  • COPE Youth Health Leadership Work Group

  • Parents

  • COPE Research Work Group

  • COPE Policy Work Group

  • COPE Youth Leadership Advisory Committee

  • Outputs/Participation

  • # of partners identified to represent six “Call to Action” priority areas

  • Strategy developed to address priority needs/gaps

  • # of engaged Parents ,Youth, Community Partners

  • # of programs identified for best practices

  • # of workshops, trainings, seminars by/for/with youth & families

  • # Youth Presentations

  • # of existing polices reviewed for obesity/ chronic disease, youth leadership & engagement,

  • # of stories from the field

  • # of publications

COORDINATION

COLLABORATION

SUCCESS FACTORS

  • Increase in activities contributing to access to healthy foods (e.g., community gardening

  • Increased access to enhanced physical activity

  • Increased parent, youth, school & community engagement

  • Increased organizational practice changes

  • Increased stories from the field as a awareness, advocacy tool

  • Increased involvement of coalitions in policy change

  • Increased policy implementation (e.g., 95210, Health in Every Policy)

  • Increased programs and policies developed to address needs/gaps

  • Increase in repository of existing activities to reduce childhood obesity

  • Increased engagement of youth and families

  • Increased leadership opportunities for youth voice and participation

  • Increased changes in existing policies and practices

  • Increased sustainability of programs and policies to address needs/gaps

  • Increase in # of community mini-grants aligned with 7 success strategies and COPE C2A items

  • Increased marketing and advertising practices

  • Use of new knowledge generated from project

  • Increased effective communication engaging partners on knowledge, awareness & action

  • Increased hits on COPE Website

  • Increased local research forming/framing the work

  • Increased opportunities for family and youth engagement , education, & empowerment

  • Increased opportunities & partnerships for community, local, county and /or state policy

  • Increased sustainable resources

  • Increased multi-sector policy, environmental and behavior changes

  • Increased development of coalitions

  • Functions/Activities

  • Partnership development and sustainability

  • Development of Stories from the Field

  • Policy development and education

  • Research development and innovation

  • Data and evaluation

  • Outputs/Participation

  • # of partnerships aligned working with 7 success strategies & Call to Action priority areas

  • # of existing activities to reduce childhood obesity

  • # of youth community leaders

  • # of policies developed

  • # of grantees using best practices models

  • Development of a best practice model

(June 2012)


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