Program of swedish russian seminar early childhood education zone of proximal development
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PROGRAM OF SWEDISH-RUSSIAN SEMINAR EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION: ZONE OF PROXIMAL DEVELOPMENT PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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PROGRAM OF SWEDISH-RUSSIAN SEMINAR EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION: ZONE OF PROXIMAL DEVELOPMENT. Swedish preschool challenges G roup size and organizational conditions in preschool Professor Sonja Sheridan, University of Gothenburg [email protected] Moscow, 27-29 May, 2014.

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PROGRAM OF SWEDISH-RUSSIAN SEMINAR EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION: ZONE OF PROXIMAL DEVELOPMENT

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Program of swedish russian seminar early childhood education zone of proximal development

PROGRAM OF SWEDISH-RUSSIAN SEMINAR EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION: ZONE OF PROXIMAL DEVELOPMENT

Swedish preschool challenges

Group size and organizational conditions in preschool

Professor Sonja Sheridan, University of Gothenburg

[email protected]

Moscow, 27-29 May, 2014


Program of swedish russian seminar early childhood education zone of proximal development

Challenges

focus for learning, quality, evaluation and assessment

  • The quality of the preschool environment

  • The teacher– child interaction

  • Group size

The child

Development and outcomes

  • Curriculum implementation


Preschool arenas in sweden

Preschool arenas in Sweden

Din text

S

Society

  • Society:

  • The Ministry of Education and Science

  • The National Agency for Education

  • The National Agency for School-inspection

  • Policy, curriculum and guidelines, quality

    • Curriculum goals to aim at that are linked to one another throughout the educational system – mirroring the same view on knowledge, learning and the child/student

    • Stable government financing and good resources to preschool

    • Preschool teacher education – academic level

    • Policy to evaluate the quality of the learning environment/preschool

  • Municipality:

  • Municipalities are responsible on a local level

  • Preschool:

  • Preschool teachers responsibility create conditions for children’s learning

Municipality

Preschool


The swedish educational system

The Swedish educational system


Swedish preschool

Swedish preschool

  • An important aspect of the welfare system, a school-form of its own, the first step in the educational system - Ministry of Education

  • The educational system, is decentralised and governed by goals instead of regulations

  • Full cover, stable government financing, low fees for parents, low child-staff ratio and well-educated staff

  • High pedagogical and political intentions:

    • A new preschool teacher education in 2011, 3 and 1/2 year – a bachelor degree in the six term, the last term on advanced level with possibilities to continue on the master program

    • Revision of curriculum, came into force 2011

    • A New Education Act, came into force 2011


The swedish preschool context

The Swedish preschool context

Preschools in 2012 = 9991 (M = 7267 & P = 2 724)

1-5 years old - for parents who are working, studying, on parental leave or unemployed and for children themselves

84% of all one to five year olds are in preschool(2012/2013)

Parents/children are entitled to a place in preschool within three or four months

3, 4 and 5 year-olds are entitled, free of charge, to at least 525 hours of preschool yearly

A maximum fee

Group size = 16,2 (2013)

Team of staff = preschool teacher and child care attendants


A revision of the preschool curriculum

A revision of the preschool curriculum

Raising the ambition of preschool with a strengthened pedagogical task

The goals and content related to literacy, mathematics, science and technology are strengthened

A new area are introduced – documentation and evaluation

Preschool teachers – responsible for pedagogical issues

Responsibility of the preschool head

National preschool curriculum with clear and integrated content goals for learning, play & care


The preschool curriculum

The preschool curriculum

  • The quality of the preschool shall be regularly and systematically documented, followed up, evaluated and developed.

  • Evaluating the quality of the preschool and creating good conditions for learning requires that the child’s learning and development be monitored, documented and analysed.

  • The aim of evaluation is to obtain knowledge of how the quality of the preschool i.e. its organisation, content and actions can be developed so that each child receives the best possible conditions for learning and development.


Variation in preschool quality

Variation in preschool quality


Ecers and subscale means

ECERS and subscale means


Structural quality group size staff child ratio on different arenas

Structural quality Group size & staff-child ratio – on different arenas

Din text

S

Society

  • Society:

  • No numbers recommended for group size or staff-child ratio

  • Municipality:

  • Municipalities are responsible on a local level – decide on staff-child ratio and group size

  • Preschool:

  • Preschool teachers responsibility to organize the child group and to create conditions for children’s learning

Municipality

Preschool


Children in preschool in sweden 2013

Children in preschool in Sweden (2013)


Education at a glance

Education at a Glance


Program of swedish russian seminar early childhood education zone of proximal development

The impact of group size on children’s affordances in preschoolPia Williams, Sonja Sheridan & Ingrid Pramling Samuelsson


Group size and organisational conditions for children s learning in preschool a teacher perspective

Group size and organisational conditions for children’s learning in preschool: A teacher perspective

  • This study aims, from a teacher perspective, to examine organisational conditions for children’s learning in preschool in relation to group size and a perspective on pedagogical quality.

  • The questions at issue are:

    • What are teachers’ views on group size in preschool?

    • How do teachers express that they organise the child group and the learning environment in preschool, and why?


The organisation of children in preschool

The organisation of children in preschool

  • Group size, number of children in a group: 11-45

  • Staff 3-8 (Staff-child ratio 1/5)

    • Toddler groups (1-3 years of age)

    • Older children (3-5 years of age)

    • Sibling groups (1-5 years of age)

    • Age-homogenous groups(one-year olds, two-year olds)

    • Extended child groups and extended working-teams (To combine two traditional child groups into a large child-group of approximately 40 children and 8 adults)


The design of the study

The design of the study

  • 12 participating preschools - age groupings; 1-3, 3-5 or 1-5, and one preschool with 5 years old children

  • 24 preschool teacher interviews – 2 from each preschool

  • Questions about:

  • a day in preschool and the work with the child group,

  • what preschool teachers can do in a large compared to a small child group,

  • what content and activities preschool teachers work with in relation to the organisation of the children in groups and

  • the curriculum, children’s learning and participation in relation to the number of children in their group.


Results

Results

Two main themes;

  • Teachers’ views on group size in preschoola

  • The organisation of children and the preschool day:

    • A free play organised environment

    • An activity-organised environment

    • A learning oriented organised environment


Conclusion challenges

Conclusion - challenges

  • Group size and the organisation of the group

  • Children’s unequal opportunities for learning

  • Intentional contra unintentional learning

  • Preschool teachers competence as fundamental for conditions created for children’s learning in preschool

  • Preschool teacher competence as differences in:

    • focus, communication, interaction, pedagogical awareness, intentions, didactics, content knowledgeand organisational competence


Some references

Some references

  • Sheridan, S. (2001). Quality Evaluation and Quality Enhancement in Preschool - A Model of Competence Development. Early Child Development and Care, 166, 7-27.

  • Sheridan, S., Giota, J., Han, Y. M., & Kwon, J. Y. (2009). A cross-cultural study of preschool quality in South Korea and Sweden: ECERS evaluations. The Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 24, 142-156.

  • Sheridan, S. (2009). Discerning pedagogical quality in preschool. Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, 53(3), 245-261.

  • PramlingSamuelsson, I., & Sheridan, S. (2009). Preschool quality and young children's learning in Sweden. International Journal of Child Care and Education Policy,3, 1-12.

  • Pramling Samuelsson, I., & Sheridan, S. (2010). A turning-point or a backward slide - the challenge facing the Swedish preschool today. The Journal of Early Years, 30(3),219-227.

  • Sheridan, S., & Pramling Samuelsson, I. (2013). Preschool a source for young children's learning and wellbeing. International Journal of Early Years Education.http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09669760.2013.832948

  • Pramling Samuelson, I., Sheridan, S., & Blennow, M. (2013). Well-being of preschool children in Sweden – the role of early childhood education and free health care. In Barnekow, V., Jensen, B.B., Currie, C., Dyson, A., Eisenstadt, N. and Melhuish E. (Eds.) Improving the lives of children and young people: Case studies from Europe. Volume 1. Early Years. Copenhagen: WHO Regional Office for Europe. Pp. 40-49. http://www.euro.who.int/en/publications/abstracts/improving-the-lives-of-children-and-young-people-case-studies-from-europe.-volume-1.-early-years


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