Reciprocal Disturbance Interactions
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Ecosystem Introduction Function Disturbance Quantitative Analysis & Results Implications Ecosystem Management PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Reciprocal Disturbance Interactions in Pinus albicaulis Ecosystems Nancy Bockino – M.S. Candidate Daniel Tinker – Advisor University of Wyoming Department of Botany. Ecosystem Introduction Function Disturbance Quantitative Analysis & Results Implications Ecosystem Management.

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Ecosystem Introduction Function Disturbance Quantitative Analysis & Results Implications Ecosystem Management

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Presentation_6589

Reciprocal Disturbance Interactionsin Pinus albicaulis Ecosystems Nancy Bockino – M.S. CandidateDaniel Tinker – AdvisorUniversity of Wyoming Department of Botany


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  • Ecosystem Introduction

    • Function

    • Disturbance

  • Quantitative Analysis & Results

  • Implications

    • Ecosystem

    • Management


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Black Bear Harvesting Cones

Photo: Ryan Sims

Seed Dispersal Vector

Clark’s Nutcracker

Photo: A. Wilson


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Ecological Background

Whitebark Distribution

Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem – Northwest Wyoming


Ecological background

EcologicalBackground

Mountain Pine Beetle

Native insect

Photo from Allen Carroll


Ecological background1

Ecological Background

Blister Rust

Exotic Pathogen

Photo Susan Hagle, USFS


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Which tree & stand characteristics determine beetle selection and

the resulting mosaic of mortality?


Project objectives

Project Objectives

Quantify

  • Whitebark characteristics related to beetle selection

  • Beetle host-selection patterns

  • Relationship between blister rust & beetle selection

    Provide

    1. Summary of whitebark condition in the GYE

  • Predictions of beetle selection

  • Ecosystem familiarity to aid restoration strategies


Study sites

Study Sites

Sylvan Pass

Breccia

Teewinot

Mt. Leidy


Three stand types

Three Stand Types

Whitebark & Non-Beetle Host

Whitebark & Alternate Beetle Host

Pure Whitebark


Data collection

Data Collection

  • Within A Stand (2-3 ha)

    • 24 plots systematically distributed

    • Variable radius

    • Tree = replicate


Whitebark status in the greater yellowstone ecosystem

Whitebark Status in theGreater Yellowstone Ecosystem


Step 1 chi square

Step 1: Chi-Square


Step 2 selection ratio

Step 2: Selection Ratio

(# preferred host attacked÷ total attacked)

(# preferred host available ÷ total available)

=

  • Accounts for:

  • 1. stand density

  • 2. species composition

  • 3. sequence of attack

  • Selection Ratio 1.0 = No Preference

  • Host characteristics

  • blister rust severity

  • tree species


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Sylvan Pass

Selection Ratio 1.0 = No Preference

Step 2: Selection Ratio

*α = 0.05

Teewinot

Breccia

Mt. Leidy

Beetles prefer:

1. whitebark over lodgepole

2. whitebark with heavy blister rust


Step 2 selection ratio1

Step 2: Selection Ratio

1.0


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Step 3: Multiple Logistic Regression

Response Variable

  • Binary – Selected OR Not Selected

    Predictor Variables

  • Stand type (pure vs. non-host mix)

  • Blister rust severity (light vs. heavy)

  • Tree diameter


Step 3 multiple logistic regression

Step 3: Multiple Logistic Regression


Conclusions

Conclusions

  • Beetles select whitebark over lodgepole

  • Blister rust influences selection probability

    Positive relationship between heavy rust & beetle selection.

  • Interactions Between

  • Blister Rust & Beetle Selection

  • Enhance Disturbance Severity


Implications

Implications

  • “Barometer of change”

  • Spatial & temporal prioritization of restoration sites

  • Alteration of genetic structure of remaining seed source

  • Redirection of succession


Acknowledgements

Acknowledgements

Funding sources:

Joint Fire Science Program Grant

# H1200040001

UWYO – NPS Research Grant

Wyoming Native Plant Society

Dan Tinker

Ken Gerow

David Legg

Cory Bolen

Bill Romme

Kelly McCloskey – Grand Teton NP

Liz Davey

Andy Norman

Contact Info: [email protected]

Michael Straw

UWYO

Ryan Sims

CSU

Bridger-Teton NF

My Mom, Alida


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