How to write a yearbook feature
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How to Write a Yearbook Feature. There is no substitute for good writing. It flows. It glows. It lives. -Susan Duncan.    REMEMBER most yearbook copy should be features, not news. Make your features interesting. If you are bored reading it, others will be also.

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How to write a yearbook feature l.jpg

How to Write a Yearbook Feature

There is no substitute for good writing. It flows. It glows. It lives.

-Susan Duncan


Remember most yearbook copy should be features not news l.jpg
   REMEMBER most yearbook copy should be features, not news.



Find a central idea or angle for your story as yourself how can i present this topic in a new way l.jpg
Find a central idea or angle for your story. As yourself, “How can I present this topic in a new way?”


Capture true feeling and human interest in your story l.jpg
Capture true feeling and human interest in your story. “How can I present this topic in a new way?”


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Use a clustering technique or brainstorming to get a list of ideas to possibly include in your feature.


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Compose good questions to use in your interview. Avoid yes/no questions. Ask plenty of HOW and WHY questions. Use DESCRIBE questions. You are asking questions to get specifics for your copy.

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Interview the subject do not let the words give me a quote ever come out of your mouth l.jpg
INTERVIEW the subject. Do not let the words “ yes/no questions. Ask plenty of HOW and WHY questions. Use DESCRIBE questions. You are asking questions to get Give me a quote” ever come out of your mouth.


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Sit down and talk to the subject with your question sheet in hand, but do not be limited by your pre-interview questions. Ask follow-up questions. Write down everything the person says or use a recorder. This is the most important part of the process.


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If a person you are interviewing says, “Just make something up,” tell them you are taking journalism, not creative writing. Give them more time or ask more questions to spur them into saying something actually worth putting down on paper.


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Avoid “I enjoyed,” “I was excited,” “It was interesting,” “hard work and determination,” or any other cliché quotes.


Write the feature using interviews from three or more sources write while the interviews are fresh l.jpg
Write the feature using interviews from three or more sources. Write while the interviews are fresh.


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Write your lead, using a narrative, a shocking statement, an incredible quote, an anecdote, or specific information about the subject.



Don t be stodgy or too formal you are a student not confucius avoid webster too he is also dead l.jpg
Don’t be stodgy or too formal. You are a student, not Confucius. Avoid Webster, too. He is also dead.



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Make your feature complete a circle from the lead to the conclusion. The reader should sigh in admiration that the path you began in the lead has been brought full circle in the conclusion.


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