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Microsoft Windows XP Illustrated Introductory Getting Started with Windows XP Unit Introduction Microsoft Windows is an operating system program that controls: The operation of your computer Programs you run on your computer

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Microsoft windows xp illustrated introductory l.jpg

Microsoft Windows XP Illustrated Introductory

Getting

Started with Windows XP


Unit introduction l.jpg
Unit Introduction

  • Microsoft Windows is an operating system program that controls:

    • The operation of your computer

    • Programs you run on your computer

      • Programs,also known as applications, are task-oriented software that help you to accomplish tasks such as word processing or using a spreadsheet

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Unit introduction cont l.jpg
Unit Introduction (cont.)

  • Microsoft Windows has a Graphical User Interface (GUI, pronounced “gooey”)

    • You interact with the computer through the use of graphics, icons (small meaningful pictures), and other meaningful words, symbols, and windows

    • Contains Windows, rectangular frames that contain file contents, a program, or icons

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Starting windows and viewing the desktop l.jpg
Starting Windows and Viewing the Desktop

  • The desktop is an on-screen version of an actual desk, containing windows, icons, files and programs

  • The taskbar is a bar at the bottom of the screen that allows you to start and switch among open programs

  • The Start button is on the left end of the taskbar, and is used to start programs, find and open files, access Help and Support, and more

  • The Notification area is on the right end of the taskbar, and displays the time, date, and program related icons

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Starting windows and viewing the desktop cont l.jpg
Starting Windows and Viewing the Desktop (cont.)

Desktop background; yours might differ

  • Turn on your computer

    • Windows automatically starts and displays the desktop, or a logon screen where you must enter a password

Mouse pointer

Start button

Taskbar

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


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Starting Windows and Viewing the Desktop (cont.)

  • Your logon and startup steps might differ depending on whether you are on a nonshared (single user) computer, a shared computer, or a networked computer

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using and changing a password l.jpg

Passwords are used to maintain security on a shared or networked computer

Passwords are encrypted, which is the process of logically scrambling data, to keep them secure

Passwords are case-sensitive, which means there is a distinction between upper- and lower-case letters

Passwords should be at least seven characters long, and should contain combinations of upper- and lower-case letters, and non-alphabetic characters such as numbers and symbols

Never share your password or leave it in the open, and always log off or shut down your computer when you leave it

Using and Changing a Password

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using and changing a password cont l.jpg
Using and Changing a Password (cont.)

  • To change your password on a networked computer with Windows Professional:

    • Press [Ctrl][Alt][Delete]

    • In the Windows Security dialog box, click Change Password

    • Type the old password and the new password where indicated, then click OK

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using the mouse l.jpg
Using the Mouse

  • A mouse is a handheld input device that you roll across a flat surface to position the mouse pointer

  • A mouse pointer is a small symbol that indicates the pointer’s relative position on the desktop

  • Basic mouse pointer shapes include:

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using the mouse cont l.jpg
Using the Mouse (cont.)

Right mouse button

  • A typical mouse has two buttons, although yours may differ:

    • Left button: used to select text or click icons

    • Right button: used to open a shortcut menu

Left mouse button

Shortcut menu

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using the mouse cont11 l.jpg
Using the Mouse (cont.)

  • Basic mouse techniques include:

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using the mouse with the web style l.jpg

Because Windows XP integrates the Internet, it allows you to choose to single-click an item to select it (Web style) instead of double-clicking (Classic style)

Click the Start button on the taskbar, then click Control Panel

In the Control Panel, click Switch to Classic View if necessary, then double-click the Folder Options icon

In the Folder Options dialog box, click the Single-click to open an item (point to select) option button, then click OK

Using the Mouse with the Web Style

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Getting started with the windows desktop l.jpg
Getting Started with the Windows Desktop choose to single-click an item to select it (

Pinned items (top) and frequently used items (bottom) appear in the left pane

  • The Start button on the taskbar opens a list of commands that allow you to:

    • Start a program

    • Open a document

    • Change a Windows setting

    • Find a file

    • Display support information

Start menu; yours will differ

Program, settings, and file options appear in the right pane

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Getting started with the windows desktop cont l.jpg
Getting Started with the choose to single-click an item to select it (Windows Desktop (cont.)

  • Start menu commands:

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Changing the display to windows classic settings l.jpg
Changing the Display to choose to single-click an item to select it (Windows Classic Settings

  • Windows Classic is the interface used for Windows 98 or Me

  • If you feel more comfortable working in the Classic environment, you can change to this display:

    • Right-click a blank area of the desktop, then click Properties on the shortcut menu

    • In the Display Properties dialog box, click the Themes tab if necessary, click the Theme list arrow, click Windows Classic, then click OK

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Managing windows l.jpg
Managing Windows choose to single-click an item to select it (

  • Windows allows you to work with more than one program or window at a time

  • You can identify a window by the title bar, which shows the program and filename if applicable

  • Each window has a border that you can use to resize it and buttons to maximize or minimize it

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Managing windows cont l.jpg
Managing Windows (cont.) choose to single-click an item to select it (

  • You can organize the desktop in several ways:

    • Click the appropriate button in the upper-right corner of the window. To make it:

      • An icon on the taskbar, click the Minimize button

      • Fill the screen, click the Maximize button

      • Closed, click the Close button

    • To move a window, position the mouse pointer over the title bar, click the left mouse button, then drag the window to the new location

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Managing windows cont18 l.jpg

To resize a window: choose to single-click an item to select it (

Position the mouse pointer on the border of the window, click the left mouse button, then drag to resize

Mouse pointer shapes that appear when resizing windows:

Managing Windows (cont.)

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Moving and resizing the taskbar l.jpg

You can also resize and move other desktop elements, such as the taskbar

With Windows XP, the taskbar is locked by default so it cannot be resized or moved

To unlock the taskbar, right-click a blank area of the taskbar, then click Lock the Taskbar on the shortcut menu to deselect it

To move the taskbar, drag it to any edge of the desktop

To change the size of the taskbar, drag its edge upwards with the vertical resize pointer

Moving and Resizing the Taskbar

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using menus toolbars and panes l.jpg
Using Menus, Toolbars, and Panes the taskbar

Toolbar

Menu bar

Check mark

Bullet

Arrow indicates submenu

Pane

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using menus toolbars and panes cont l.jpg
Using Menus, Toolbars, the taskbarand Panes (cont.)

  • A menu is a list of commands that you use to accomplish certain tasks

    • A checkmark or bullet mark indicates that a feature is enabled

      • To disable a checked feature, click the command again

      • To disable a bulleted feature, select another command

    • Typical menu items include:

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using menus toolbars and panes cont22 l.jpg
Using Menus, Toolbars, the taskbarand Panes (cont.)

  • A toolbar contains buttons that are convenient shortcuts for menu commands

    • When you position the pointer over a button, a screen tip appears displaying the button name

    • To select a button, click it with the left mouse button

  • A pane is a frame within a window, from which you can access commands and navigation controls

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Unlocking and customizing toolbars l.jpg

With Windows XP, most toolbars are locked by default so they cannot be resized or moved

To unlock a toolbar, click View on the menu bar, point to Toolbars, then click Lock the Toolbars to deselect it

To move an unlocked toolbar, drag the dotted left edge of the toolbar to the new location

To customize a toolbar by adding or removing buttons:

Click View on the menu bar, point to Toolbars, then click Customize

In the Customize Toolbar dialog box, select buttons to add or remove, then click the appropriate button

Unlocking and Customizing Toolbars

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using scroll bars l.jpg
Using Scroll Bars cannot be resized or moved

  • Scroll bars appear when you cannot see all of the items available in a window

Up scroll arrow

Scroll box

Vertical scroll bar

Horizontal scroll bar

Down scroll arrow

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using scroll bars cont l.jpg
Using Scroll Bars (cont.) cannot be resized or moved

  • You can use scroll bars to display additional window contents

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


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Windows XP can be adjusted to fit the needs of those with impaired vision or hearing using the Accessibility Wizard

To open the Accessibility Wizard, click the Start button on the taskbar, point to All Programs, point to Accessories, point to Accessibility, then click Accessibility Wizard

Follow the wizard steps to adjust your keyboard, display, and mouse functions

Accessibility for Special Needs

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using dialog boxes l.jpg
Using Dialog Boxes impaired vision or hearing using the Accessibility Wizard

  • A dialog box is a window that opens when you must supply more information before a command can be carried out

  • Dialog boxes:

    • Open when you choose a menu option that is followed by an ellipsis (…) or when you open an option from the Control Panel

    • May contain tabs at the top that separate commands into related categories

    • Can be closed by clicking OK to accept all of your changes, or by clicking Cancel to not make any changes

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using dialog boxes cont l.jpg
Using Dialog Boxes (cont.) impaired vision or hearing using the Accessibility Wizard

  • A sample dialog box:

Tab

Up and Down arrows

Check box

Command buttons

Option button

Text box

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using dialog boxes cont29 l.jpg
Using Dialog Boxes (cont.) impaired vision or hearing using the Accessibility Wizard

  • Typical items in a dialog box:

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using windows help and support l.jpg
Using Windows Help impaired vision or hearing using the Accessibility Wizardand Support

  • The Help and Support center is a complete resource of information, training, and support to help you use Windows XP

  • Help and Support is like a book stored on your computer, with additional links to the Internet, a search feature, an index, and a table of contents

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using windows help and support cont l.jpg
Using Windows Help impaired vision or hearing using the Accessibility Wizardand Support (cont.)

Search text box

  • To use Help and Support:

    • Click the Start button on the taskbar, then click Help and Support

    • The Help and Support Center window opens

    • In the Search text box, type the search criteria, then press [Enter]

Categories and topics

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using windows help and support cont32 l.jpg
Using Windows Help impaired vision or hearing using the Accessibility Wizardand Support (cont.)

  • To use Help and Support (cont.)

    • A search pane opens, displaying results from the search in three areas: Suggested Topics; Full-text Search Matches; Microsoft Knowledge Base (only when connected to the Internet)

    • Click a topic, then click the Expand indicator next to the appropriate topic in the right pane

Right pane displays help on the topic you select

Search results

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using windows help and support cont33 l.jpg
Using Windows Help impaired vision or hearing using the Accessibility Wizardand Support (cont.)

  • Click the buttons on the Help toolbar to:

    • Navigate back and forth between Help topics you have visited

    • Add a topic to the Favorites list so you can return to it later

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Getting help while you work l.jpg

You can access impaired vision or hearing using the Accessibility Wizardcontext-sensitive help related to your current task

Click the Help button in the upper-right corner of a dialog box, then click the mouse pointer on the item for which you need additional help

OR

Right-click an item in a dialog box, then click What’s This? to display an explanation

OR

Display Help windows while you work

Getting Help while you Work

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Turning off the computer l.jpg
Turning Off the Computer impaired vision or hearing using the Accessibility Wizard

  • Shutting down the computer properly:

    • Prevents loss of data and problems restarting Windows

    • Involves several steps:

      • Saving and closing all open files

      • Closing all open windows

      • Exiting all running programs

      • Shutting down Windows

      • Turning off the computer

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Turning off the computer cont l.jpg
Turning Off the impaired vision or hearing using the Accessibility WizardComputer (cont.)

  • To shut down the computer:

    • Click the Close button in the upper-right corner of all open windows or programs

    • Click the Start button on the taskbar, then click Turn Off Computer

    • In the Turn Off Computer dialog box, click Turn Off to exit Windows and shut down your computer

    • If you see the message “It’s now safe to turn off your computer,” turn off the computer and the monitor

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Turning off the computer cont37 l.jpg
Turning Off the impaired vision or hearing using the Accessibility WizardComputer (cont.)

  • Shut down options:

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Working on a computer for multiple users l.jpg

When many users share a computer, each user should have his or her own Windows identity to:

Keep files completely private

Customize Windows preferences

Give identities unique user names and passwords

To set up user accounts, do so during installation, or double-click User Accounts in the Control Panel to add a new user

When Windows starts, a user profile must be selected and the correct password entered

Working on a Computer for Multiple Users

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Working on a computer for multiple users cont l.jpg
Working on a Computer for Multiple Users (cont.) or her own Windows identity to:

  • To change users on a shared computer :

    • Click the Start button on the taskbar, then click Log Off or Switch User

  • To change users on a networked computer :

    • Press [Ctrl][Alt][Delete], type your user name and password, then click OK

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Microsoft windows xp illustrated introductory40 l.jpg

Microsoft Windows XP or her own Windows identity to:Illustrated Introductory

Working

with Windows Programs


Unit introduction41 l.jpg
Unit Introduction or her own Windows identity to:

  • A program is software used to accomplish specific tasks, such as word processing and file management

  • Windows accessories are built-in programs to accomplish basic tasks

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Starting a program l.jpg
Starting a Program or her own Windows identity to:

  • The most common method for starting a program is to use the Start menu

    • Click the Start button on the taskbar

    • Point to All Programs on the Start menu

    • Click the appropriate program or submenu to access a program

Start menu

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Creating documents in other languages l.jpg

To install multiple languages on your computer or her own Windows identity to:

Open the Control Panel in Classic View

Double-click the Regional and Language Options icon, click the Languages tab, then click Details

In the Text Services and Input Languages dialog box, click Add

In the Add Input Language dialog box, click the Input language list arrow, click the language to install, then click OK

Creating Documents in Other Languages

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Creating documents in other languages cont l.jpg
Creating Documents or her own Windows identity to:in Other Languages (cont.)

  • To compose a document that uses more than one language

    • Click the language icon on the Language Bar on the task bar

    • Click the language you want to use, then type your message

    • Any recipient of multi-language documents must have the same languages installed on their computer to read and edit the documents

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Opening and saving a wordpad document l.jpg

To store a document permanently, you must save it as a or her own Windows identity to:file, which is a collection of information with a unique name and location

Opening and Saving a WordPad Document

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Opening and saving a wordpad document cont l.jpg

To open a document: or her own Windows identity to:

Click the Open button on the Toolbar

In the Open dialog box, click the Look in list arrow, then click the drive and folder where your file is located

In the file list, click the file, then click Open

Opening and Saving a WordPad Document (cont.)

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Opening and saving a wordpad document cont47 l.jpg
Opening and Saving or her own Windows identity to:a WordPad Document (cont.)

  • To save a file for the first time:

    • Click File on the menu bar, then click Save As

    • In the Save As dialog box, type a new filename, then click Save

  • To save a file with the same name:

    • Click File on the menu bar, then click Save

      OR

    • Click the Save button on the toolbar

      OR

    • Press [Ctr][S]

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


File extensions l.jpg

File extensions or her own Windows identity to: are the three letters that may appear after a file name in a dialog box or file management program window, such as .txt or .doc

To display or change file extension settings:

Click the Start button on the taskbar, then click My Documents

In the My Documents window, click Tools on the menu bar, then click Folder Options

Make the appropriate changes in the Folder Options dialog box, then click OK

File Extensions

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Editing text in wordpad l.jpg
Editing Text in WordPad or her own Windows identity to:

  • An advantage of using a word processing program is that you can edit a document, or change its contents without recreating it

  • Text can be edited using the mouse, toolbar buttons or the keyboard

  • The Clipboard is a temporary storage for text or objects that you have cut or copied

  • Dragging and dropping moves an object or text using the mouse without saving it to the clipboard

  • Navigating a document means to look for and position the insertion point in the appropriate location in a document

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Editing text in wordpad cont l.jpg
Editing Text or her own Windows identity to:in WordPad (cont.)

  • Methods for selecting text include:

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Setting paragraph tabs l.jpg

Tabs or her own Windows identity to: set how text or numerical data aligns in relation to the edges of a document

A tab stop is a predefined stopping point along the document’s typing line

Default tab stops are every half-inch, but you can set tab stops manually wherever

To display tab stops on the ruler, click any word in the paragraph

To set a tab stop, click the ruler where you want to set it, or use the Tabs command on the Format menu to open the Paragraph dialog box

To delete a tab stop, drag it off the ruler

Setting Paragraph Tabs

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Formatting text in wordpad l.jpg
Formatting Text in WordPad or her own Windows identity to:

  • The format of text is the appearance, which can be used to emphasize text or make it more attractive

    • Formatting text includes adding bold, italics, underline, or color

  • A font is a set of characters with the same typeface or design

    • Font size is measured in points, which is 1/72 of an inch

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Formatting text in wordpad cont l.jpg
Formatting Text or her own Windows identity to:in WordPad (cont.)

  • You can make most formatting changes in WordPad using the Format Bar

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Setting paragraph indents l.jpg

Indenting or her own Windows identity to: a paragraph means to move it away from the left or right margin

To change paragraph indentation settings, move the appropriate indentation marker(s) on the ruler:

The left side of the ruler has three markers:

First-line indent marker: the top triangle, which controls where the first line of the paragraph begins

Hanging indent marker: the bottom triangle, which controls where the remaining lines of the paragraph begin

Left indent marker: the small square under the bottom triangle, which allows you to indent the entire paragraph

The right side of the ruler has one marker:

Right indent marker: controls where the right edge of the paragraph ends

Setting Paragraph Indents

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Creating a graphic in paint l.jpg
Creating a Graphic in Paint or her own Windows identity to:

Toolbox

  • Paint is a Windows accessory you use to work with and create graphics or pictures, specifically bitmap (.bmp) files

  • A bitmap file is a map of a pictures created from small dots or bits, black, white or colored

Bitmap file in Paint window

Color boxes

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Creating a graphic in paint cont l.jpg
Creating a Graphic or her own Windows identity to:in Paint (cont.)

  • Paint has buttons, known as tools, for drawing and manipulating pictures, located in the Toolbox

  • To create a graphic, click the appropriate button in the Toolbox, position the pointer in the Paint window, then drag to the appropriate size

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Copying data between programs l.jpg
Copying Data or her own Windows identity to:Between Programs

Logo selected in Paint document

Logo pasted in WordPad document

  • Even if files were created in two different programs, you can copy data from one to another

  • A program button on the taskbar represents any window that is open on the desktop

  • Windows can be tiled, or arranged horizontally and vertically so that both can be seen at the same time

Windows tiled vertically

Program buttons on taskbar

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Copying data between programs cont l.jpg
Copying Data or her own Windows identity to:Between Programs (cont.)

  • To copy files from one program to another:

    • Open both programs and files

    • Tile the windows as necessary by right-clicking the taskbar and choosing the appropriate tiling option

    • Copy the text or object using a method below

    • Click where to place the copied text or object in the destination file, then paste the text or object using a method below

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Switching between files l.jpg

If you have multiple file and program windows, the taskbar groups them under one program button

For example, two WordPad documents will be represented on the taskbar as one button named 2 WordPad

When you click the 2 WordPad button on the taskbar, a menu appears, from which you can choose the file to view

Switching Between Files

Click list arrow to select a Paint window to open

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Printing a document l.jpg
Printing a Document groups them under one program button

  • Printing a document creates a printout or hard copy paper document

  • Most Windows programs have a print option that you can access through the Print dialog box and a Print button on the toolbar

  • Print Preview allows you to look at the layout and formatting of a document before you print it

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Printing a document cont l.jpg
Printing a Document (cont.) groups them under one program button

  • To preview a document :

    • Click the Print Preview button on the Toolbar to view a preview image of the printed document

    • Click Close on the Print Preview toolbar

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Printing a document cont62 l.jpg
Printing a Document (cont.) groups them under one program button

  • To print a document :

    • Click the Print button on the Toolbar

      OR

    • Click File on the menu bar, then click Print

    • In the Print dialog box, click OK

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Installing a printer l.jpg

The Add Printer Wizard makes installing a printer quick and easy by asking a series of questions to help you:

Set up a local or network printer

Install printer software

Establish a connection

Assign a name to the printer

Print a test page to make sure the printer works

To start the wizard:

From a Print dialog box, double-click the Add Printer icon in the Select Printer box

From the Start menu, click Printers and Faxes, then click Add a printer in the left pane

Installing a Printer

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Playing a video or sound clip l.jpg
Playing a Video or Sound Clip easy by asking a series of questions to help you:

  • Windows Media Player is a Windows accessory with which you can play video, sound, and mixed-media files

  • Streaming media is continuously playing video, live broadcasts, sound, or music

  • You can copy music tracks or an entire CD to your computer and create your own jukebox or playlist

  • Skin is the Windows Media Player’s appearance, which you can change

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Playing a video or sound clip cont l.jpg
Playing a Video or easy by asking a series of questions to help you:Sound Clip (cont.)

Taskbar

  • To play a clip:

    • Click the Start button on the taskbar, point to All Programs, point to Accessories, point to Entertainment, then click Windows Media Player

    • Click File on the menu bar, click Open, navigate to and click the file to play, then click Open

    • Click the Play button

Playlist

Video file

Play button

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Playing media from the internet l.jpg

Videos, live broadcasts, and music tracks are types of media available from the Internet

When you stream the media, the video or music starts playing while the file is transmitted over the Internet but is not stored on your computer

When you download a file, it is transferred to your computer before it is played

Playing Media from the Internet

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Playing media from the internet cont l.jpg

To stream media from the Internet: available from the Internet

Locate the Web site that contains the media

Click the link to the media

Wait for Windows Media Player to start playing

To download a file to your computer from the Internet:

Locate the Web site that contains the media

Click the download link

In the File Download dialog box, click the Save this file to disk option, then click OK

In the Save As dialog box, specify the location, then click Save

Playing Media from the Internet (cont.)

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Creating a movie l.jpg
Creating a Movie available from the Internet

  • Windows Movie Maker is an accessory that allows you

    to create movies from a variety of sources

  • A collection is an organization of clips to be used in projects

Video clip icon

Audio clip icon

Coffee Cup collection

Preview of selected media clip

Contents of the Coffee Cup collection

Frame 1

Timeline button

Storyboard

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Creating a movie cont l.jpg
Creating a Movie (cont.) available from the Internet

  • To create a movie:

    • Click the Start button on the taskbar, point to All Programs, point to Accessories, then click Windows Movie Maker

    • Click File on the menu bar, then click Import

    • In the Select the File to Import dialog box, locate and click the file, then click Open

    • Drag the clip to the storyboard or audio track

    • Repeat as necessary, using the Timeline or Storyboard view as appropriate

    • Click the Save Project button on the toolbar, then in the Save Project dialog box, name the file, then click Save

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using copyrighted materials l.jpg
Using Copyrighted Materials available from the Internet

  • When creating movies, documents, or other work, consider the source of videos, images, and text

  • Media from other sources, including magazines, books, and the Internet are the intellectual property of others

  • Permission must be asked for and received in order to be used and a fee may be required

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Microsoft windows xp illustrated introductory71 l.jpg

Microsoft Windows XP available from the InternetIllustrated Introductory

Managing

Files and Folders


Unit introduction72 l.jpg
Unit Introduction available from the Internet

  • File management is organizing and keeping track of files and folders

    • A folder is a container for storing programs and files

  • Windows has two file management programs, both of which have two panes in order to display folders and task options:

    • My Computer

    • Windows Explorer

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Understanding file management l.jpg
Understanding File Management available from the Internet

  • File management can help you do the following:

    • Organize files and folders in a file hierarchy

    • Save files in a folder with an appropriate name for easy identification

    • Create a new folder so you can reorganize information

    • Delete files and folders you no longer need

    • Find a file easily

    • Create shortcuts to files and folders

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Understanding file management cont l.jpg

Sample file hierarchy available from the Internet

Understanding File Management (cont.)

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Opening and viewing my computer cont l.jpg
Opening and Viewing available from the InternetMy Computer (cont.)

  • To open My Computer and view files and folders:

    • Click the Start button on the taskbar, then click My Computer

    • Click an option in the left pane to perform tasks related to the folder’s contents

    • Double-click a drive or folder in the right pane to display its contents in the right pane

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


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Opening and Viewing available from the InternetMy Computer (cont.)

  • Drives and folders are represented by icons in file management programs:

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Opening a document with a different program l.jpg

Most documents are associated with a specific program and will open automatically in that program

To open a document in a different program:

Right-click the icon of the file on the desktop

Point to Open With on the shortcut menu

Click the application you want to use to open the document, or click Choose Program to access more program options

Opening a Document with a Different Program

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Viewing files and folders l.jpg
Viewing Files and Folders will open automatically in that program

  • Each time you open a folder in My Computer, Windows keeps track of where you’ve been

  • You can change the view to display folders as icons, in list format, and with different levels of details

  • Standard Buttons toolbar buttons are used to navigate and change folder and file display options:

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Viewing the Folders List will open automatically in that program

  • The Folders list, also called the Folders Explorer bar, displays the file hierarchy of the drive and folders on your computer in the left pane of the My Computer or Windows Explorer window

  • At the top of the hierarchy is the desktop, followed by:

    • My Documents

    • My Computer

    • My Network Places

    • Other drives and folders

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Viewing the Folders List (cont.) will open automatically in that program

Folders list

  • Click the Folders button on the Standard Buttons toolbar to display folders in the left pane

  • Click the Expand and Collapse indicators to display or hide folder hierarchy in the left pane

  • Click a folder in the left pane to display its contents in the right pane

Selected folder’s contents appear in the right pane

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


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Windows keeps a list of your most recently used files, folders, and network computers in the History folder

Use the History Explorer bar to find a recently used file by date, site, most visited, and order visited today

To display the History Explorer bar, click View on the menu bar, point to Explorer bar, then click History

Viewing Files Using the History List

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Creating and Renaming folders, and network computers in the History folderFiles and Folders

  • Creating a new folder can help you organize and keep track of files and folders

  • To create a new folder, select the location where you want the new folder, create the new folder, then name it

  • Name the folder meaningfully, so you can know its contents by reading the name

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Creating and Renaming Files and Folders (cont.) folders, and network computers in the History folder

  • To create a new folder:

    • Use the Folders Explorer bar to navigate to the folder where the new folder will be stored

    • Click File on the menu bar, point to New, then click Folder

    • Type the folder name, then press [Enter]

New folder appears in both panes

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Creating and Renaming Files and Folders (cont.) folders, and network computers in the History folder

  • To rename a folder:

    • Right-click the folder icon in the right pane

    • Click Rename on the shortcut menu

    • Type the new folder name, then press [Enter]

Click command to rename the file

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Searching for Files and Folders folders, and network computers in the History folder

  • The Search Companion:

    • Can help you find files and folders

    • Opens in the Search Explorer bar

    • Gives you the option to find files or folders by name, location, size, type, and date created or last modified

    • Is also accessible from the Start menu

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Searching for Files and folders, and network computers in the History folderFolders (cont.)

  • To open the Search Explorer bar:

    • Click the Search button on the Standard Buttons toolbar

    • Choose a search option method in the Search Explorer bar

    • Type the search criteria in the text box

    • Click the Look in list arrow to choose a new location if necessary

    • Click Search

    • The Search program finds the files and folders that match the criteria

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Searching for Files and folders, and network computers in the History folderFolders (cont.)

  • Search Explorer bar with All files and folders option:

Search button

Enter file name or partial name here

Enter text contained in file here

Click button to start Search

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Searching for Files and folders, and network computers in the History folderFolders (cont.)

  • Search results

Files and folders that match your search

Additional search options

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Copying and Moving folders, and network computers in the History folderFiles and Folders

  • Copying a folder leaves it in the original location and creates a duplicate in a new location

  • Moving a folder relocates it

  • To move or copy a folder correctly:

    • Right-click the folder

    • Drag it to the location to where you want it moved or copied

    • Choose the appropriate command from the shortcut menu

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Copying and Moving folders, and network computers in the History folderFiles and Folders (cont.)

  • Moving a file from one folder to another by dragging it:

File being moved

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Copying and Moving folders, and network computers in the History folderFiles and Folders (cont.)

  • Copying a file from one location to another by right-clicking, then dragging:

Shortcut menu; click Copy Here to copy the file to its new location

Copied file will appear here

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The Send To command on the shortcut menu that appears when you right-click an item on the desktop or a file management window lets you send a file or folder to a new location:

To a floppy disk to make a quick back-up copy

To a mail recipient as an electronic attachment

To the desktop to create a shortcut

To move from one folder to another

Sending Files and Folders

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Deleting and Restoring you right-click an item on the desktop or a file management window lets you send a file or folder to a new location:Files and Folders

  • You can delete items you no longer need, or remove them from the disk

  • If you delete a file or folder from the desktop or from the hard disk, it goes to the Recycle Bin

    • The Recycle Bin stores all items you delete from your hard disk

    • You can restore it if necessary

    • If you delete a file from a floppy disk it cannot be restored

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Deleting and Restoring you right-click an item on the desktop or a file management window lets you send a file or folder to a new location:Files and Folders (cont.)

  • You can delete a file in several ways:

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Deleting and Restoring you right-click an item on the desktop or a file management window lets you send a file or folder to a new location:Files and Folders (cont.)

  • To restore a file:

    • If it was the last action you performed in My Computer or Windows Explorer, click Edit on the menu bar, then click Undo

    • Select the file in the Recycle Bin window, then click Restore this item in the left pane under Recycle Bin Tasks

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You can adjust Recycle Bin settings by right-clicking the Recycle Bin on the desktop, then clicking Properties on the shortcut menu

Settings options include:

Deleting files from the hard drive immediately instead of placing them in the Recycle Bin

Increasing or decreasing the amount of space allotted to the Recycle Bin by moving the Maximum Size slider

Recycle Bin Properties

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Creating a Shortcut to a Recycle Bin on the desktop, then clicking Properties on the shortcut menuFile or Folder

  • A shortcut is a link that you can place in any location to gain access to a file, folder, or program just by double-clicking it

    • Right-click the file, then click Create Shortcut on the shortcut menu

    • An icon with a small arrow for a shortcut now appears

    • Move the shortcut to the desktop, to a file or folder, to the Start menu, or the taskbar by simply dragging it or by right-clicking it, dragging it, then clicking Move Here on the shortcut menu

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Microsoft Windows XP Recycle Bin on the desktop, then clicking Properties on the shortcut menuIllustrated Introductory

Customizing

File and Folder Management


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Unit Introduction Recycle Bin on the desktop, then clicking Properties on the shortcut menu

  • Customizing file and folder management can save you time and effort

  • Customizing options include:

    • Create links to files and folders

    • Change folder view options

    • Store a file in a custom personal folder

    • Display disk and folder size information

    • Compress files and folders to save disk space

    • Use a compact disk to backup and store files

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Adding a Folder to the Recycle Bin on the desktop, then clicking Properties on the shortcut menuFavorites List

  • The Favorites list in My Computer or Windows Explorer allows you to return to the folder by selecting a link

  • Favorites can:

    • Be deleted

    • Save time spent navigating

    • Include locations on the Internet

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Adding a Folder to the Recycle Bin on the desktop, then clicking Properties on the shortcut menuFavorites List (cont.)

  • To add a Folder to the Favorites list:

    • Open My Computer or Windows Explorer

    • Navigate to the folder you want to add a link to, and display its contents in the right pane

    • Click Favorites on the menu bar, then click Add to Favorites

    • Rename the link if necessary in the Add Favorite dialog box, then click OK

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Adding a Folder to the Recycle Bin on the desktop, then clicking Properties on the shortcut menuFavorites List (cont.)

  • Favorites can be organized by clicking Favorites on the menu bar, then clicking Organize Favorites

  • Options include creating a Favorites subfolder, moving a link to a folder, renaming a link, or deleting it

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Changing Folder Options Recycle Bin on the desktop, then clicking Properties on the shortcut menu

  • Windows displays folder contents in a standard way, known as the default

  • Default settings are as follows, although yours may differ depending on your computer setup:

    • Tiles view displays files as icons

    • Common task links appear in the left pane

    • Folders open in the same window

    • Items open when you double-click them

  • Folder views options include: Thumbnails, Icons, List, or Details

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Changing Folder Recycle Bin on the desktop, then clicking Properties on the shortcut menuOptions (cont.)

  • To change the view:

    • Click the Views button on the Standard Buttons toolbar, then click the appropriate option

  • To open the Folder Options dialog box:

    • Click Tools on the menu bar, then click Folder Options

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Changing File Details to List Recycle Bin on the desktop, then clicking Properties on the shortcut menu

  • You can add or remove folder details information, such as:

    • Name

    • Size

    • Type

    • Date Modified

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Changing File Details Recycle Bin on the desktop, then clicking Properties on the shortcut menuto List (cont.)

  • To change the file details shown:

    • Display the folder’s contents in the right pane

    • Click View on the menu bar, then click Choose Details

    • Click the appropriate details check boxes in the Choose Details dialog box

    • Click OK

      OR

    • In Windows Explorer, right-click any column indicator button, then click a detail option on the shortcut menu to deselect it

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


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To change the order of column details to make it easier to find the information you need:

Open the Choose Details dialog box by clicking View on the menu bar, then clicking Choose Details

OR

Position the mouse pointer over a column indicator button, then drag it between the two columns where you want it to appear

Moving Columns in Details View

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


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Changing File find the information you need:and Folder List Views

  • To change the order in which the file and folder information is sorted in the columns

    • Click a column indicator button to sort by the type of information in that column

      OR

    • Click View on the menu bar, point to Arrange Icons, then click a details category to sort by

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Displaying Disk find the information you need:and Folder Information

  • The size of the disk and how much space remains is important, because disks store a limited amount of data

  • You can also change the disk label, which is the name assigned to a hard or floppy disk

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Displaying Disk find the information you need:and Folder Information (cont.)

Type a disk name here

  • To name a disk:

    • In My Computer, right-click the icon of the disk whose name you want to change

    • Click Properties on the shortcut menu, then click the General Tab in the Properties dialog box if necessary

    • Click in the text box, type the name, then click OK

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Displaying Disk find the information you need:and Folder Information (cont.)

  • To display disk or folder information:

    • In My Computer, right-click the icon of the disk or folder whose properties you want to display

    • Click Properties on the shortcut menu, then click the General Tab in the Properties dialog box if necessary

    • View the disk properties, then click OK

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


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When you create a file, it takes up space on the disk find the information you need:

Files with text are typically smaller than graphics files

File size is measured in bytes

A byte is a unit of storage the size of a single character or pixel

A kilobyte (KB) is 1024 bytes

A megabyte (MB) is 1,058576 bytes, or 1,024 KB

A gigabyte (GB) is 1,024 megabytes

Understanding File Sizes

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Compressing Files find the information you need:and Folders

  • You can compress files in special folders using compression software to decrease the file size

  • Compression:

    • Frees up disk space

    • Reduces file transfer time over the Internet or between computers

    • Denotes folders by a zippered folder icon

    • Uses a copy in the compression but the original remains intact

  • You can uncompress, or extract, a file and open it as you normally would

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Compressing Files find the information you need:and Folders (cont.)

  • To compress a file or folder:

    • In My Computer or Windows Explorer, navigate to the location where you want the compressed file to be stored

    • Right-click an empty area of the window, point to New on the shortcut menu, then click Compressed (zipped) folder

    • Type the file name, then press [Enter]

    • Drag the files or folders you want to compress to the compressed folder

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Compressing Files find the information you need:and Folders (cont.)

  • To extract compressed files or folders:

    • In My Computer with the task pane displayed in the left pane, double-click the compressed folder in the right pane

    • In the left pane under Folder Tasks, click Extract all files

    • Navigate through the Extraction Wizard, selecting a location for the extracted files, then click Finish

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


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If your hard disk is formatted as NTFS, you need to use a different compression method

NTFS is an advanced file system that provides additional security, performance, and reliability

FAT (File Allocation Table) or FAT32 is the standard file system

To compress a file or folder on an NTFS drive:

Right-click the file or folder, then click Properties on the shortcut menu

In the Properties dialog box, click the General tab if necessary, then click Advanced

Click the Compress contents to save disk space check box to select it, then click OK twice

In the Confirm Attribute Changes dialog box, click the appropriate option, then click OK

Compressing Files and Folders on an NTFS Drive

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


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Using Personal Folders different compression method

My Documents window

  • Windows provides a set of personal folders

  • Depending on your setup, your list may vary, but a standard set of personal folders includes the following:

    • My Documents

    • My Pictures

    • My Music

    • My Videos

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Using Personal Folders (cont.) different compression method

  • Your personal folders are private unless you decide to share them with others who use your computer

  • Personal folders on a shared computer are identified by the user name

    • Each user on a shared computer has his or her own set of personal folders

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Using the Shared different compression methodDocuments folder

  • Shared folders provide a place to make files, pictures, etc., available to others who use your computer

  • Your personal folders (i.e. My Documents) each have a shared counterpart (i.e. Shared Documents)

  • To share files and folders:

    • Open My Documents, then click the file or folder you want to share

    • Drag the file or folder to the Shared Documents (for example) folder under Other Places in the left pane

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


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Customizing a Personal different compression methodFolder

  • In My Documents, you can create and customize your folders and view options based on their contents

  • The left pane of each personal folder provides links to file management activities specifically related to the folder’s contents

  • You can apply a folder template, which is a collection of folder task links and viewing options

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Customizing a Personal different compression methodFolder (cont.)

  • To customize a folder for pictures in My Documents:

    • Display the folder’s contents in the right pane

    • Right-click a blank area of the folder window, then click Customize This Folder on the shortcut menu

    • Click the Use this folder type as a template list arrow, then click the appropriate option

    • Click the Also apply this template to all subfolders check box if necessary, then click OK

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Customizing a Personal different compression methodFolder (cont.)

  • Picture tasks in the My Pictures folder

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Managing Files different compression methodand Folders on a CD

  • A compact disc (CD) is a small circular disc used to store large amounts of information

    • CDs have a low cost & convenient size

    • CD recording hardware is popular

    • CDs are an effective way to backup or transfer information from your computer without a network

  • You can write (copy) files and folders to either a:

    • Compact disc-recordable (CD-R), which you cannot erase

    • Compact disc rewritable (CD-RW) that you can reuse

  • Standard CDs hold up to 700 MB of data

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


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Managing Files different compression methodand Folders on a CD (cont.)

  • To create a CD, you must have a CD recorder, blank CDs, and enough temporarystorage space on your hard drive:

    • Insert a blank CD-R or CD-RW into your CD recorder

    • Open My Computer, then double-click the folder whose contents you want to copy

    • In the left pane under File and Folder tasks, click Copy this folder

    • In the Folder list, click the CD recording device, then click Copy

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Managing Files different compression methodand Folders on a CD (cont.)

  • Steps to create a CD (cont.)

    • In the left pane under Other Places, click My Computer, then double-click the CD recording drive

    • In the left pane under CD Writing Tasks, click Write these files to CD

    • Follow the steps in the CD Writing Wizard

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You can use Windows Media Player to create CDs from music tracks you have stored in the Media Library

A standard CD (700 MB) holds 76 minutes of music

You can copy: Windows Media (.wma), mp3, and .wav files

Be sure to be aware of any copyright restrictions

Creating Music CDs

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


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