Evaluation of a scanned laser display as an alternative low vision computer interface
Sponsored Links
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
1 / 14

Evaluation of a Scanned Laser Display as an Alternative Low Vision Computer Interface PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 203 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Evaluation of a Scanned Laser Display as an Alternative Low Vision Computer Interface. Conor Kleweno, Eric Seibel, Ph.D., Kyle Kloeckner, Bob Burstein, Erik Viirre, M.D., Ph.D., Thomas Furness III., Ph.D. . Problem Statement:.

Download Presentation

Evaluation of a Scanned Laser Display as an Alternative Low Vision Computer Interface

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Evaluation of a Scanned Laser Display as an Alternative Low Vision Computer Interface

Conor Kleweno, Eric Seibel, Ph.D., Kyle Kloeckner, Bob Burstein, Erik Viirre, M.D., Ph.D., Thomas Furness III., Ph.D.


Problem Statement:

  • Can the Virtual Retinal Display (VRD) be a helpful alternative low vision computer interface

  • A testing protocol is needed to compare the two interfaces for low vision use

1


Introduction:

  • Persons with low vision find computer use difficult with the standard computer display (CRT)

  • A CRT is limited in brightness and contrast

  • Low vision aid software can make computer use cumbersome

  • The VRD may be a better alternative for low vision computer users

  • The VRD uses a modulated, low power laser that displays an image directly onto retina using a two mirror scanning mechanism

2


Objectives:

  • Design a testing protocol to compare the VRD with a standard computer screen display (CRT)

  • Conduct vision tests with low vision subjects with different low vision conditions

  • Determine if the VRD can be an effective alternative low vision computer interface

  • Use an acuity test to compare visual acuity between the VRD and a CRT

3


Objectives (continued):

  • Use a reading speed test to compare reading performance between the VRD and a CRT

  • Determine what types of low vision benefit from VRD technology

  • Have low vision subjects compare the quality of images displayed between VRD and a CRT in terms of clarity and brightness


Testing Site Setup:

  • Testing conducted in a controlled environment at the Department of Services for the Blind

  • 15 low vision subjects with variety of conditions

4


Four Test Conditions:

  • A standard CRT with white on black contrast

  • A standard CRT with red on black contrast

  • The VRD with red on black contrast with a luminance setting of one half of the measured value of the white on black CRT

  • The VRD with red on black contrast with a luminance setting that matches the measured value of the white on black CRT

5


Procedure:

  • CRT acuity test used the white on black contrast

  • VRD acuity test used the matched luminance setting

  • Reading speed tests conducted at four character angle sizes

  • Three 20 second trials done at each character angle size

  • Subjects given oral questionnaire to obtain subjective data on clarity and brightness of images

6


Acuity Test:

  • Acuity tests conducted using the Landolt ring test

  • Pointer arrows were used to assist subject in locating image

  • Acuity test range was 20/1128 to 20/67

7


Reading Speed Tests:

  • Three words shown simultaneously to subject on PowerPoint slides as shown below

  • Subject manually advanced through slides and orally read the words

  • Unrelated words used

  • Reading speed evaluated as correctly read words per 20 second test

  • Box placed around words to help subject locate image

bird

her

state

8


Results: Reading Speed

9


Results: Visual acuitySubjective responses

10


Discussion:

  • VRD increased visual acuity and reading speed in some low vision subjects

  • Overall, subjects with low vision conditions due to optical causes benefited most from VRD

  • 64% of subjects had equal or better visual acuity with the VRD

  • 71% of subjects found VRD images clearer

  • 79% of subjects found VRD images brighter

  • In general, subjects disliked red on black contrast

  • The testing protocol allowed a valid comparison between the two displays

  • More testing is planned to further define types of low vision that will benefit from VRD

11


Acknowledgements:

  • Human Interface Technology (HIT) Lab

  • Howard Hughes Medical Scholar Summer Program

  • John Olson and the Washington State Department of Services for the Blind, Seattle, Washington

  • National Science Foundation (Grant number DMI-9801294)

12


  • Login