End-to-End E2E  Carrier Ethernet OAM

End-to-End E2E Carrier Ethernet OAM PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 306 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Panel Members. . . . . Arie GoldbergCEO and Chief TechnologistOmnitron Systems [email protected] . Eitan SchwartzVP, Pseudowire

Download Presentation

End-to-End E2E Carrier Ethernet OAM

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


1. End-to-End (E2E) Carrier Ethernet OAM

3. End-to-End OAM Introduction Arie Goldberg

4. Agenda Introduction UNI Link/Service layer Ethernet OAM Ethernet Service UNI (User Network Interface) Ethernet over any infrastructure E-NNI What is the MEF E-NNI E-NNI Attributes E-NNI Demarcation End-to-End

5. Demand Drivers – Services and Bandwidth

6. The MEF 5-Attributes of Carrier Ethernet

7. MEF defined Basic CE Services

8. Global CE Market – Facts & Forecasts

9. Challenges of CE for Service Providers Turn-up services quickly and efficiently - Increase revenue and customer satisfaction Quality – increase customer satisfaction Scalability (QoS, BW etc) – increase customer satisfaction On-net and off-net services – increase footprint and revenue opportunities Availability of 99.999% - enable SLA commitments and increase revenues Provide Services at low cost (OPEX) Traditional Private Lease Line and Private Virtual Connection (PVC) are provided through T1/T3 or SONET/SHD access loops. They are complicated, costly, somewhat slow and not very scalable. They do offer very consistent and reliable performances, and have built-in OAM for fault detection and management.Traditional Private Lease Line and Private Virtual Connection (PVC) are provided through T1/T3 or SONET/SHD access loops. They are complicated, costly, somewhat slow and not very scalable. They do offer very consistent and reliable performances, and have built-in OAM for fault detection and management.

10. Response to Challenges New Protocol Solutions Link OAM (802.3ah) End-to-End Service Connectivity Fault OAM (802.1ag) End-to-End Service Performance Monitoring (Y.1731) Enable quick turn-up and troubleshooting for on/off-net services, increase reliability and up-time, reduces cost of operation and enables SLA commitments. Traditional Private Lease Line and Private Virtual Connection (PVC) are provided through T1/T3 or SONET/SHD access loops. They are complicated, costly, somewhat slow and not very scalable. They do offer very consistent and reliable performances, and have built-in OAM for fault detection and management.Traditional Private Lease Line and Private Virtual Connection (PVC) are provided through T1/T3 or SONET/SHD access loops. They are complicated, costly, somewhat slow and not very scalable. They do offer very consistent and reliable performances, and have built-in OAM for fault detection and management.

11. Interfaces and Ethernet Virtual Circuits

12. The User Network Interface Eitan Schwartz

13. Agenda Introduction UNI Link/Service layer Ethernet OAM Ethernet Service UNI (User Network Interface) Ethernet over any infrastructure Support for legacy services over Ethernet E-NNI What is the MEF E-NNI E-NNI Attributes E-NNI Demarcation End-to-End

14. Ethernet Demarcation Device – MEF UNI Key functions for Ethernet Demarcation Link/Service layer Ethernet OAM (CFM and PM) Ethernet Service UNI (User Network Interface) Service Layer Policing and Definition – MEF/ITU Complementary functions Ethernet over any infrastructure (EoFiber, EoCU,…) Support for legacy services over Ethernet (e.g. TDM & Voice) For providing intelligent Ethernet services, a few functions are required at the service demarcation point. These are: Link/Service layer Ethernet OAM to provide remote monitoring and test Ethernet Service UNI (User Network Interface) to provide service policing and definition. In addition a retail carrier or mobile operator will typically need sophisticated traffic management capabilities to guarantee end-to-end SLA for the various traffic flows A wide range of interface options provides flexibility in allowing Ethernet service over various infrastructures (EoFiber, EoCU,…) Integrated support for legacy services makes it possible to offer additional services such as T1/E1 over the same Ethernet infrastructureFor providing intelligent Ethernet services, a few functions are required at the service demarcation point. These are: Link/Service layer Ethernet OAM to provide remote monitoring and test Ethernet Service UNI (User Network Interface) to provide service policing and definition. In addition a retail carrier or mobile operator will typically need sophisticated traffic management capabilities to guarantee end-to-end SLA for the various traffic flows A wide range of interface options provides flexibility in allowing Ethernet service over various infrastructures (EoFiber, EoCU,…) Integrated support for legacy services makes it possible to offer additional services such as T1/E1 over the same Ethernet infrastructure

15. Link/Service layer Ethernet OAM A summary of available Ethernet OAM Mechanisms Here we discuss a few OAM standards that have emerged to help the Ethernet-NTU monitor and troubleshoot an Ethernet network and quickly detect failures. The two OAM types are End-to-end and Single segment OAM. As we see in the diagram, IEEE 802.3ag and ITU Y.1731 are end-to-end OAM mechanisms with 802.3ag providing connectivity fault management capabilities such as end-to-end continuity check and non-intrusive loopback, whereas Y.1731 is more focused on performance management, including measurement of Frame Delay, Frame Delay Variation, Frame Loss, Availability and so on. On the other hand, 802.3ah is a single segment OAM that enables remote management and fault indication, including remote loopback, dying gasp, and MIB parameters retrieval. These OAM capabilities are an important step in the evolution of Ethernet to carrier EthernetHere we discuss a few OAM standards that have emerged to help the Ethernet-NTU monitor and troubleshoot an Ethernet network and quickly detect failures. The two OAM types are End-to-end and Single segment OAM. As we see in the diagram, IEEE 802.3ag and ITU Y.1731 are end-to-end OAM mechanisms with 802.3ag providing connectivity fault management capabilities such as end-to-end continuity check and non-intrusive loopback, whereas Y.1731 is more focused on performance management, including measurement of Frame Delay, Frame Delay Variation, Frame Loss, Availability and so on. On the other hand, 802.3ah is a single segment OAM that enables remote management and fault indication, including remote loopback, dying gasp, and MIB parameters retrieval. These OAM capabilities are an important step in the evolution of Ethernet to carrier Ethernet

16. Ethernet Service UNI (User Network Interface) Ethernet Service UNI classifies services into flows or EVCs Traffic classified by Port, VLAN ID, VLAN priority, DSCP, etc. Ensures better service to certain flows over others Essential for proper prioritization of critical or latency-sensitive services such as signaling and voice Must be at Customer/Carrier Demarcation Especially if Access Link requires Policing/Rate Limiting Traffic that exceeds CIR/EIR rates is discarded Defined per port or EVC basis CIR/EIR: Committed Information Rate / Excess Information Rate CBS/EBS: Committed Burst Size / Excess Burst Size Ethernet service UNI is critical for Quality of Service (QoS) Queuing, scheduling and shaping mechanisms further enhance QoS Critical for Quality of Service (QoS) Ensures better service to certain flows over others, To ensure QoS we need: Traffic Classification: Identify traffic requiring preferential service based on Port, VLAN ID, VLAN priority, DSCP, etc. Bandwidth Profile: Apply CIR/CBS and EIR/EBS to each flow to define the priority and bandwidth. Policing (rate limiting): Discard traffic that exceeds CIR/EIR rates Queuing and Scheduling: Congestion avoidance mechanisms used to ensure that high priority traffic is not dropped. Shaping: conform egress traffic to a specific line rate (Important when backhauling Ethernet over constrained bandwidth connections). Minimize network and Pseudowire induced latency For example, packetize only at network ingress and egress points CDMA should be prioritized over BE data to minimize delay and dropped calls during soft handoff Compensation for lost and out of-sequence packets Critical for Quality of Service (QoS) Ensures better service to certain flows over others, To ensure QoS we need: Traffic Classification: Identify traffic requiring preferential service based on Port, VLAN ID, VLAN priority, DSCP, etc. Bandwidth Profile: Apply CIR/CBS and EIR/EBS to each flow to define the priority and bandwidth. Policing (rate limiting): Discard traffic that exceeds CIR/EIR rates Queuing and Scheduling: Congestion avoidance mechanisms used to ensure that high priority traffic is not dropped. Shaping: conform egress traffic to a specific line rate (Important when backhauling Ethernet over constrained bandwidth connections). Minimize network and Pseudowire induced latency For example, packetize only at network ingress and egress points CDMA should be prioritized over BE data to minimize delay and dropped calls during soft handoff Compensation for lost and out of-sequence packets

17. In and Out-of-Footprint SLA Monitoring In this case, the retail carrier owns the Ethernet-NTU represented in this diagram by RAD’s ETX product line. The carrier places it at the customer sites to provide media conversion from the carrier’s fiber, copper or wireless facility to Ethernet. The ETX delivers the Ethernet service to the customer with the agreed upon interface, bandwidth and priority. The carrier can control and modify the service attributes to meet changing customer needs and monitor the networks’ performance to ensure compliance with the service level agreement (SLA). This monitoring capability is especially important when the service is offered over a 3rd party network, whose quality of service (QoS) could degrade over time. In this diagram we show the typical case of a retail service provider monitoring the SLA of the access carrier. This is from ETX at network edge to ETX at customer premises. At the same time the retail carrier can monitor the SLA end-to-end between ETX devices. This approach helps pinpoint responsibility if network degradation is detected.In this case, the retail carrier owns the Ethernet-NTU represented in this diagram by RAD’s ETX product line. The carrier places it at the customer sites to provide media conversion from the carrier’s fiber, copper or wireless facility to Ethernet. The ETX delivers the Ethernet service to the customer with the agreed upon interface, bandwidth and priority. The carrier can control and modify the service attributes to meet changing customer needs and monitor the networks’ performance to ensure compliance with the service level agreement (SLA). This monitoring capability is especially important when the service is offered over a 3rd party network, whose quality of service (QoS) could degrade over time. In this diagram we show the typical case of a retail service provider monitoring the SLA of the access carrier. This is from ETX at network edge to ETX at customer premises. At the same time the retail carrier can monitor the SLA end-to-end between ETX devices. This approach helps pinpoint responsibility if network degradation is detected.

18. Ethernet Over Any Infrastructure

19. Circuit Emulation / Pseudowire technology enables legacy migration to packet-switched networks (IP, Ethernet, and MPLS). MEF-8: IA for the Emulation of PDH Circuits over Carrier Ethernet MEF-18: Abstract Test Suite for Circuit Emulation Services Pseudowire challenges: “Packetization” and Encapsulation of TDM Traffic Attenuate Packet Delay Variation (PDV or Jitter) Compensate for Frame Loss and Out-of-Sequence Packets Recover Clock and Synchronization We use pseudowires to emulate TDM, ATM and FR services over IP, Ethernet and MPLS As shown in the diagram, these pseudowires could be emulating TDM circuits between PBXs, ATM connections between DSLAMs and B-RAS or backhauling cellular traffic from BTS to BSC or RNC across the PSN. To succeed, pseudowire must be able to packetize or segment TDM traffic before adding an IP, Ethernet or MPLS header and sending across the PSN. At the receiving end it needs to compensate for network jitter and if necessary compensate for It also needs to compensate for Frame Loss and Out-of-Sequence Packets. A critical challenge is to accurately recover Clock at the remote end and therefore maintain synchronization across an asynchronous packet based network. This technology is now mature and tens of thousands of ports have been deployed since It was first introduced in 1999.We use pseudowires to emulate TDM, ATM and FR services over IP, Ethernet and MPLS As shown in the diagram, these pseudowires could be emulating TDM circuits between PBXs, ATM connections between DSLAMs and B-RAS or backhauling cellular traffic from BTS to BSC or RNC across the PSN. To succeed, pseudowire must be able to packetize or segment TDM traffic before adding an IP, Ethernet or MPLS header and sending across the PSN. At the receiving end it needs to compensate for network jitter and if necessary compensate for It also needs to compensate for Frame Loss and Out-of-Sequence Packets. A critical challenge is to accurately recover Clock at the remote end and therefore maintain synchronization across an asynchronous packet based network. This technology is now mature and tens of thousands of ports have been deployed since It was first introduced in 1999.

20. Example: WiMAX Backhaul over Ethernet with QoS Assuring consistent level of service across multi-tier networks requires monitoring of both the end-to-end and segment QoS with notification of any degradation in circuit quality (delay, jitter) to the cellular operator. Assuring consistent level of service across multi-tier networks requires monitoring of both the end-to-end and segment QoS with notification of any degradation in circuit quality (delay, jitter) to the cellular operator. On a TDM network any discontinuity is immediately identified and delay is hardly an issue. But since Ethernet is a framed technology, it is not known when to expect a frame, we need to monitor the service from one side to the other. Ethernet OAM helps monitor each service in terms of availability, frame loss and delay. In addition, each service thresholds can be defined to send a trap when the service deviates from the SLA Assuring consistent level of service across multi-tier networks requires monitoring of both the end-to-end and segment QoS with notification of any degradation in circuit quality (delay, jitter) to the cellular operator. Assuring consistent level of service across multi-tier networks requires monitoring of both the end-to-end and segment QoS with notification of any degradation in circuit quality (delay, jitter) to the cellular operator. On a TDM network any discontinuity is immediately identified and delay is hardly an issue. But since Ethernet is a framed technology, it is not known when to expect a frame, we need to monitor the service from one side to the other. Ethernet OAM helps monitor each service in terms of availability, frame loss and delay. In addition, each service thresholds can be defined to send a trap when the service deviates from the SLA

21. The External Network-to-Network Interface Fred Ellefson

22. Agenda Introduction UNI Link/Service layer Ethernet OAM Ethernet Service UNI (User Network Interface) Ethernet over any infrastructure Support for legacy services over Ethernet E-NNI What is the MEF E-NNI E-NNI Attributes E-NNI Demarcation End-to-End

23. What is the MEF E-NNI? External Network to Network Interface (E-NNI) A reference point where 2 Service Providers meet in support of specified MEF Services Technical functionally supported by equipment at the specified reference point in support of MEF Services (*E-NNI Functional Element)

24. E-NNI Phase I Project Roadmap First Approved Draft v1.0 - Aug, 2003 Project Re-chartered: - Jul, 2006 Phase 1, AD 1.0 Current Approved - Aug, 2007 Phase 1, AD 3.3 Expected IA Approval - 4Q, 2008

25. E-NNI Phase I In Scope: E-LINE and E-LAN services (but not E-TREE) Inc. hairpining (e.g., frame may go in/out same PHY) Multiple CENS Inc. multiple E-NNIs or links between two CENs E-NNI protection (but not End-to-End service protection) Customers & SP must provide loop-free connectivity End-to-End OAM and QoS Inc. traffic “coloring” via IEEE PCPs or IETF DSCPs Service Frame delineation via IEEE 802.1 No S-Tag or single S-Tag

26. Service Type MTU Endpoint Service Mux Tag ID/CoS Preservation Link Rate L2CPs E-NNI Attributes

27. Digging Tunnels Two types of tunnels are envisioned for E-NNI Phase 1 Transit Tunnel Terminating Tunnel These require additional End Point Maps Terminating Tunnel introduces the Termination End Points (and Virtual UNI, Remote UNI) Generalization of ESC* may introduce additional types of tunnels

28. Ethernet Demarcation device – MEF NNI Key elements for E-NNI (External Network to Network Interface) demarcation function Link/Service layer Ethernet OAM – 802.3ah/802.1ag/Y.1731 Service layer policing/shaping and definition – MEF Protection mechanisms - LAG, MSTP Throughput Test – RFC-2544 E-NNI function can be part of switch/router, or dedicated device For providing intelligent Ethernet services, two functions are required at the service demarcation point: and Ethernet Network Interface Device (NID) to provide remote monitoring and test and a service UNI to provide service policing and definition. I’m going to talk about each one of these functions by themselves, starting with the NIDFor providing intelligent Ethernet services, two functions are required at the service demarcation point: and Ethernet Network Interface Device (NID) to provide remote monitoring and test and a service UNI to provide service policing and definition. I’m going to talk about each one of these functions by themselves, starting with the NID

29. MEF NNI Demarcation Network to network Interface or carrier to carrier demarcation Used for test, monitoring and network separation Provides far end MEP/MIP for SLA monitoring

30. MEF NNI Demarcation Network to network Interface or carrier to carrier demarcation Used for test, monitoring and network separation Provides far end MEP/MIP for SLA monitoring

31. MEF NNI Demarcation Network to network Interface or carrier to carrier demarcation Used for test, monitoring and network separation Provides far end MEP/MIP for SLA monitoring

32. End-to-End OAM Overview Serdar Kiykioglu

33. Agenda Introduction UNI Link/Service layer Ethernet OAM Ethernet Service UNI (User Network Interface) Ethernet over any infrastructure Support for legacy services over Ethernet E-NNI What is the MEF E-NNI E-NNI Attributes E-NNI Demarcation End-to-End

36. Hierarchical OAM Domains

42. End-to-End OAM Summary Arie Goldberg

43. Summary Challenge: Enable quick turn-up and reliable operation of Carrier Ethernet networks with guaranteed E2E SLAs Solution: Link OAM End-to-End Service Fault OAM End-to-End Service Performance Monitoring Traditional Private Lease Line and Private Virtual Connection (PVC) are provided through T1/T3 or SONET/SHD access loops. They are complicated, costly, somewhat slow and not very scalable. They do offer very consistent and reliable performances, and have built-in OAM for fault detection and management.Traditional Private Lease Line and Private Virtual Connection (PVC) are provided through T1/T3 or SONET/SHD access loops. They are complicated, costly, somewhat slow and not very scalable. They do offer very consistent and reliable performances, and have built-in OAM for fault detection and management.

44. Q and A

45. End-to-End OAM Thank You

  • Login