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Developing a Coaching Culture – best practice thinking Phillip Matthews Director, Executive Education UCD Smurfit School Peter Bluckert Programme Director UCD Smurfit School Developing a Coaching Culture – best practice thinking Presenter: Peter Bluckert Moderator: Phillip Matthews

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Developing a Coaching Culture – best practice thinking

Phillip Matthews

Director, Executive Education

UCD Smurfit School

Peter Bluckert

Programme Director

UCD Smurfit School


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Developing a Coaching Culture – best practice thinking

Presenter: Peter Bluckert

Moderator: Phillip Matthews


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AGENDA

Defining a coaching culture

The evolving stages of a coaching culture

Examples of corporate goals for developing a coaching culture

Ten key principles in developing a coaching culture

What do great coaching managers do?

25 minutes

Questions and Answers

15 minutes


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1. Defining a coaching culture

“A critical mass of its members engage in creating relationships through which impactful conversations can take place that are crucial for continuous improvement of performance.

They do this by actively and courageously seeking out opportunities to hold respectful and candid conversations.

Vitally, they have learned how to value and use feedback from all sources as the key to developing the high trust relationships necessary for the transformation of organisational performance – the move from good to great”

[Crane 2000 ]


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2. The evolving stages of a coaching culture

Executive coaching

Typically starts here

with external

coaching to senior

leaders to support

development or prevent

derailment

Ad hoc growth

Coaching grows in ‘pockets’.

No one quite knows

who’s doing what or

what the organisational

benefits are

A more structured approach

Recognition that a more strategic

approach to develop internal

capacity and a coaching culture

is required. Executive briefings

and Manager as Coach

training courses are

commissioned

1

2

3

Bedding in

Leaders model coaching

behaviours which creates a

cascading effect.

Managers engage in

coaching conversations

Coaching begins

to stick.

Integrating

Coaching becomes integrated

into people and performance

management processes.

Greater use of coaching

with teams as well

as individuals

Normalised

A critical mass/tipping point

is reached and a

coaching style of leading

becomes a way of doing

business, a dominant

style of interacting

4

5

6


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3. Examples of corporate goals for coaching

  • Develop and sustain competitive advantage

  • Support current leaders, grow future leaders

  • Retain high potential staff

  • Strengthen company cohesion and engagement

  • Staff motivation and support


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4. Ten key principles for developing a coaching culture

Start with the question - Why take this journey? Make an honest assessment of the current culture – what’s good and working well. What needs to improve or change and why?

Align to business strategy. Should support business strategy and have clear business objectives. There needs to be a clear link between coaching and the success of the business. Establish ROI/ coaching evaluation process at the beginning against desired outcomes

Drive from the top. Successful implementation requires Executive level commitment, championing and role modelling of a coaching approach and behaviours


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4. Ten key principles for developing a coaching culture

Set up as an OD intervention. Explain to colleagues the bigger picture business rationale for developing a coaching culture.Position it positively; as developmental not remedial

Develop a common understanding of coaching. People have very different understandings of what coaching is which can lead to confusion and frustration. Agree on an organisation-wide coaching definition and core coaching models and concepts

Develop coaching capability. Commission class-leading accredited coach training and development for Executive team, senior leaders, HR , line managers and coaching ‘champions’. Ensure CPD, progression routes, supervision and support are in place


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4. Ten key principles for developing a coaching culture

Manage the quality of your externally supplied coaching. Develop a small panel of external coaches who are experienced, accredited and supervised and who fit the culture. Ensure external coaching takes place within a three or four party contract

Build a community of internal and external coaches. This provides a mechanism to ensure organisational learning can be derived from individual coaching conversations and enables cultural blockages to surface and get addressed

Gather success stories. Collect and communicate positive outcomes produced by coaching behaviours. Create a coaching intranet site

Evaluate outcomes. Conduct evaluation against agreed metrics


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5. What do great coaching managers do?

They operate from a coaching mindset which means:

They constantly look for opportunities to improve performance. They use day-day work experiences, positive and negative, highlights and mistakes as opportunities for learning and continuous improvement. They’re interested in the ‘how’ as well as the ‘what’

They spot talent and develop people. They are interested in potential as well as current performance. They challenge and stretch colleagues to be the best they can be. The result is that they grow leaders who go on to make significant contributions to the organisation

They use certain skills and display common characteristics. They ask good questions, and then they listen. They are looking to help colleagues and are capable of expressing empathy. They provide clear and timely feedback and are prepared to go to a tougher place if needed

They know their people and what they’re doing. They take the time and care to know their team members as people. They clarify tasks and performance expectations, empower people but also stay in touch and show interest in what they are working on


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QUESTIONS &

ANSWERS


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Diploma in Business and Executive Coaching

Duration: 6 workshops - 16 days in all

Schedule: Part-time

Starting: March 2010

If you would like further information, please contact Gillian Brown on:

Phone: +353 1 716 8818

Email: [email protected]

www.smurfitschool.ie/executiveeducation


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Thank you for your participation today.

For more information on our

coaching programmes led by

Peter Bluckert, please contact:

Gillian Brown, Programme Manager

Tel: +353 1 716 8818

Email: [email protected]


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NEXT WEBINAR

9th February 2010

‘Threats, Refusals and Ultimatums: Dealing with Hardball Negotiators’

with Stephen Boyle

This webinar will look at :

The challenges of dealing with opponents who won't budge from their positions

The challenges of dealing with opponents who don't want to listen

The challenges of dealing with opponents who simply refuse to negotiate


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