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Workshop Objectives. By the end of this workshop, you will be able to:Describe adult learning stylesWrite observable and measurable learning objectivesIdentify training techniques and instructional methods to meet the needs of individuals with different learning stylesDevelop a training outline.

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1. APS Training Tools of the Trade Susan Castańo, MSW & Ada Saperstein, MA Introduce self and Ada Give my interest in training: how I got involved and why I wanted to do this workshop. Front line supervision challenges NAPSA’ s support of training How many supervisors? Administrators/ front line workers? How many have some kind of OJT or training responsibilities? What are your training challenges?Introduce self and Ada Give my interest in training: how I got involved and why I wanted to do this workshop. Front line supervision challenges NAPSA’ s support of training How many supervisors? Administrators/ front line workers? How many have some kind of OJT or training responsibilities? What are your training challenges?

2. Within the context of practical, front line work. Within the context of practical, front line work.

3. What We Know about APS Training Diversity in type of training provided Wide range of providers Variety and amount of funding Creativity abounds Support and cross pollination Type of training: onsite, offsite, a couple of days to 15 days, policy related, statute related, knowledge building, skill building .one- on one training as a new worker gets hired, periodic training of new workers Range: mentoring, supervisors, state administrators reviewing policy, state/agency employed training staff that have responsibility for many programs, state/agency employed trainers dedicated to APS, contracts with Universities to provide training Funding: from no funding to lots of money. Creativity: piggy back on other state agency depts, team up with other disciplines to find training, apply for special grants, have annual conferences, full day, on-line, lodging Support: programs rely on others, colleagues in different states, curriculum developed by different statesType of training: onsite, offsite, a couple of days to 15 days, policy related, statute related, knowledge building, skill building .one- on one training as a new worker gets hired, periodic training of new workers Range: mentoring, supervisors, state administrators reviewing policy, state/agency employed training staff that have responsibility for many programs, state/agency employed trainers dedicated to APS, contracts with Universities to provide training Funding: from no funding to lots of money. Creativity: piggy back on other state agency depts, team up with other disciplines to find training, apply for special grants, have annual conferences, full day, on-line, lodging Support: programs rely on others, colleagues in different states, curriculum developed by different states

4. Practical Framework Purpose of training APS workers How do we set them up for success What skills and knowledge do they need to have? How do we transfer these skills and knowledge? How can we be sure they “got it?”

5. Teacher-Learner Relationship Connect/interact with learners Know your learners: how they learn best, what they know and don’t know Create atmosphere of mutual respect, trust, openness, security, minimal control, cooperation and feedback Create a positive context for learning

6. Characteristics of Adult Learners Autonomous and self directed Life experiences and knowledge Goal oriented Relevancy oriented Practical Autonomous: need freedom, need to participate in the process, need to work on projects that interest them, need to assume responsibility. Trainers guide and facilitate, must show how this training will help them reach their goals Life Experience: work-related, family responsibiltiies, previous education. Trainers need to draw from this and connect the topics to this. Goal-oriented: know what they want to attain, appreciate an organized program with defined elements which is directly connected to their goals Relevancy-oriented: need a reason to learn something, it has to be applicable to their work Practical: how will these knowledge or skills be useful in their work Respect: need for a safe place where individuals can express themselvesAutonomous: need freedom, need to participate in the process, need to work on projects that interest them, need to assume responsibility. Trainers guide and facilitate, must show how this training will help them reach their goals Life Experience: work-related, family responsibiltiies, previous education. Trainers need to draw from this and connect the topics to this. Goal-oriented: know what they want to attain, appreciate an organized program with defined elements which is directly connected to their goals Relevancy-oriented: need a reason to learn something, it has to be applicable to their work Practical: how will these knowledge or skills be useful in their work Respect: need for a safe place where individuals can express themselves

7. Adult Learning Styles CE: Concrete Experience RO: Reflective Observation AC: Abstract Conceptualization AE: Active Experimentation Many ways we can look at how people learn. This is a tried an true method. Others include: Sensory approaches: visual, auditory and kinesthetic learnersMany ways we can look at how people learn. This is a tried an true method. Others include: Sensory approaches: visual, auditory and kinesthetic learners

8. Concrete Experience (experiencing) Learner Learns by intuition and from specific experiences Is sensitive to people and feelings Learns from new experiences, games, role-plays Trainer should: Be concrete and practical Encourage dialogue and involvement Use questions to draw out experience Brainstorm and problem solve Act as coach Stay away from lecturing, talking at, being too abstract, using too many reasons or factsStay away from lecturing, talking at, being too abstract, using too many reasons or facts

9. Reflective Observation (reflecting) Learner Learns by observation Observes carefully before judging Looks inward for meaning Learns from lectures, observer roles, tests of knowledge, diagrams Trainer should: Use illustrations, demonstrate points, give directions Allow worker to digest info, be patient Be clear, concise, to the point Keep distance Act as guide Don’t focus on worker personally, don’t go too fast, don’t force worker to respond too quickly. Don’t be unclear or overwhelmingDon’t focus on worker personally, don’t go too fast, don’t force worker to respond too quickly. Don’t be unclear or overwhelming

10. Abstract Conceptualization (thinking) Learner Learns by thinking Is logical and systematic Acts on the basis of his/her understanding of situation Trainer should: Offer theory and readings Explain purpose, rules, regulations Offer a clear and well structured presentation of ideas, sequential steps Act as communicator of information Likes guidelines and rules. Can accept authority Stay away from vagueness, emotions, feelings. Do not appear disorganized, irrational, or illogicalLikes guidelines and rules. Can accept authority Stay away from vagueness, emotions, feelings. Do not appear disorganized, irrational, or illogical

11. Active Experimentation (applying) Learner Learns by doing Can get things done Is a risk taker Is often an Extravert: acts to influence people and events Trainer should: Offer opportunities to practice and receive feedback Use small group discussion and projects Offer options and flexibility Act as a role model Stay away from lecturing, abstract concepts, emphasis on paper work, threats, rigidity, and boring worker with too many detailsStay away from lecturing, abstract concepts, emphasis on paper work, threats, rigidity, and boring worker with too many details

12. In developing a training program, we need to think about: Objectives Key Points: things you want them to learn Skills Knowledge Instructional Methods Short lectures, handouts Group activities Cases, role plays Test OKIT; a simple overview of what’s involved in preparing a training Key Points: skills you want your workers to have when the training is over. This is where preparation begins: You realize your workers need a training in assessment in APS (topic) You think some more and realize that there are different key points in this like physical assessmetn, mental health assessment, questioning skills, etc Key points then should lead to a more focused way of setting goals and objectives for the program Instructional methods: as the learning style material shows, people learn in different ways. So we should give thought to different instructional methods. The most simple methods are short lectures supported by handouts, for the ACs (theorists), small group activities, for the Ros and cases, roleplays to practice for the AEs and CEs (applyers) Test: formal tests are too much work, but you can test by observing your workers on the jobOKIT; a simple overview of what’s involved in preparing a training Key Points: skills you want your workers to have when the training is over. This is where preparation begins: You realize your workers need a training in assessment in APS (topic) You think some more and realize that there are different key points in this like physical assessmetn, mental health assessment, questioning skills, etc Key points then should lead to a more focused way of setting goals and objectives for the program Instructional methods: as the learning style material shows, people learn in different ways. So we should give thought to different instructional methods. The most simple methods are short lectures supported by handouts, for the ACs (theorists), small group activities, for the Ros and cases, roleplays to practice for the AEs and CEs (applyers) Test: formal tests are too much work, but you can test by observing your workers on the job

13. Purpose of Developing Learning Objectives Articulate the goals of training Communicate intent of training to learner Provide a means for evaluation Assist in selection of materials, content, teaching methods

14. ABCs of Writing Learning Objectives Actor: participant, trainee Behavior: what “actor” will be able to do as a result of the training (observable and measurable) Condition: situation or condition under which “actor” will learn or demonstrate behavior Example: Refer to objectives for this workshop: By the end of this workshop (condition), participants (actor) will be able to write observable and measurable objectives (behavior)Example: Refer to objectives for this workshop: By the end of this workshop (condition), participants (actor) will be able to write observable and measurable objectives (behavior)

15. Making Objectives Measurable Use action words: describe, discuss, identify, list, demonstrate, define Avoid vague words such as understand, learn, believe, know, realize, incorporate: these cannot be measured Why is it important to have measurable objectives?Why is it important to have measurable objectives?

16. Examples of Learning Objectives: Gaining Access By the end of this training, participants will be able to describe different approaches to introducing themselves and establishing rapport at the door By the end of this training, participants will be able to describe strategies to gaining access when a client is resistant. In a role play, participants will be able to demonstrate the correct way to introduce themselves and gain access.

17. Preparing for Training Define topic area Identify trainable subtasks Develop measurable learning objectives Relate instructional methods to learning objectives Choose instructional methods that address learning styles

18. Considerations for planning training Know your audience/individual Develop a timed outline Keep activities varied and short

19. Training Methods Lecturette/ Discussion/Handouts Group activity Individual activity Case study Role play Illustrate lecturette with handouts Integrate lecturette with discussion by asking questions relating to their experience Group activity – gives them a chance to share experiences, exchange ideas. Can be done in dyads (caregiving/carereceiving) or small groups (case study planning intervention) Individual activity: practice something that Analysis activity: Illustrate lecturette with handouts Integrate lecturette with discussion by asking questions relating to their experience Group activity – gives them a chance to share experiences, exchange ideas. Can be done in dyads (caregiving/carereceiving) or small groups (case study planning intervention) Individual activity: practice something that Analysis activity:

20. Lecturette Research topic Establish/ reinforce learning points Relate to their experience Provide examples Ask challenging questions Use visuals Keep it lively

21. Group Activities Divide into dyads or small groups Provide a question, issue, case study,role play for discussion, action, or problem-solving Relate the task to your learning objectives Give clear directions and expectations Allow time for processing and feedback See handout Clear directions: in 25 minutes you should have the answers to the discussion questions on newsprint. Time for feedback: 30-60 minutes depending on the number of small groups and the extent of your assignment. Don’t do more than 4 questions or processing will take forever.See handout Clear directions: in 25 minutes you should have the answers to the discussion questions on newsprint. Time for feedback: 30-60 minutes depending on the number of small groups and the extent of your assignment. Don’t do more than 4 questions or processing will take forever.

22. Individual Activities Provide written activity to reinforce learning point Use questionnaire to help them learn about themselves Process in small or large group Create safe place for feedback. Examples: When teaching objective writing, provide trainees with sentences that include judgmental terms for them to rewrite. When teaching awareness of their own values, provide a list of value statements so that they can assess their own reactions.Examples: When teaching objective writing, provide trainees with sentences that include judgmental terms for them to rewrite. When teaching awareness of their own values, provide a list of value statements so that they can assess their own reactions.

23. Case Studies Helps trainees process through problem solving Helps trainees use new knowledge, concepts, or skills Cases can be prepared or brought by trainees Advantages: cases easily accessible. Safe practice situation Not personalizedAdvantages: cases easily accessible. Safe practice situation Not personalized

24. Ingredients for Writing Case Studies Plan case study based on learning objectives Plant your “nuggets” in the case study Pull out the “nuggets in your discussion questions Plan: make characters relevant and true to life, define feelings, attitudes and symptoms which illustrate problem, avoid unnecessary details Make a list of things you want to cover Put in details that support learning points Make sure nuggets are planted so that participants can successfully meet training objectives Develop questions that help direct discussion Get feedbackPlan: make characters relevant and true to life, define feelings, attitudes and symptoms which illustrate problem, avoid unnecessary details Make a list of things you want to cover Put in details that support learning points Make sure nuggets are planted so that participants can successfully meet training objectives Develop questions that help direct discussion Get feedback

25. Role Plays Helps trainees practice skills, observe and give feedback Can be done in large group, small group, one on one Can be written or a spontaneous part of supervision Handout: guidelines for writing role playsHandout: guidelines for writing role plays

26. Writing Role Plays Base topic on learning objective Describe facts about role (name, age, life circumstances) Describe situation (in behavioral terms) Describe problem to be discussed and feelings related to problem Provide clear instructions

27. Processing (Reflective Observation) Discussing the experiences participants have had already or sharing reactions and observations of the activity provided

28. Choosing Training Activities Provide concrete experience or connect with their experience Provide means to reflect on their experience Provide trainee with knowledge/discussion Provide opportunity to apply new knowledge/skills Handouts: adult learning style in session plan Session design: Choosing training activitiesHandouts: adult learning style in session plan Session design: Choosing training activities

29. Designing a Training Session: Worksheet Topic Area: Gaining Access Learning Style:Concrete Experiencer Experiencing: Asking trainees to share their experiences in Gaining Access: Introductions that worked, Dealing with resistance Processing: Discussing and analyzing the experiences and finding some common ideas Generalizing: Listing approaches that work, supplemented by lecturette about effective approaches Applying: Doing role plays, supervisor can model by playing worker first

30. How NAPSA can help? Library of APS Training Materials Technical Consulting through REFT APS Core Competencies and development of 1st curriculum module NAPSA Education Committee NAPSA Dream : National APS Training Institute

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