Institutional and Faculty Development in Higher Education
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Institutional and Faculty Development in Higher Education The strategic role of an Educational center Dr. Cees Terlouw PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Institutional and Faculty Development in Higher Education The strategic role of an Educational center Dr. Cees Terlouw. Introduction. 1. Case ‘ competence learning ’ 2. Bologna Process and Russian Higher Education 3. Innovation projects in the Netherlands 4. Mini multiple choice test

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Institutional and Faculty Development in Higher Education The strategic role of an Educational center Dr. Cees Terlouw

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Institutional and faculty development in higher education the strategic role of an educational center dr cees terlouw

Institutional and Faculty Development in Higher EducationThe strategic role of an Educational centerDr. CeesTerlouw


Introduction

Introduction

  • 1. Case ‘competencelearning’

  • 2. Bologna Process and RussianHigherEducation

  • 3. Innovationprojects in the Netherlands

  • 4. Mini multiple choice test

  • 5. Threeexamples of innovativeInstructional Design

  • 6. Proposition

  • 7. Educational Center

  • 8. Conclusions

  • 9. General Discussion

  • 10. Closing


1 case competence learning

1. Case competencelearning

  • Dimitri P. (32, sociologist) and Olga G. (34, economist), both researcher and teacher, like to combine theircourses in a newEnglishcourse (10 ECTS). Studentscouldthenattain the (international ) basiccompetence to execute a socio-economicanalysis of anurban environment. Moreover, they want to include teacher and student mobility with anEuropeanuniversity. Afteroneyear of delibration with (elder) colleagues and management itappears to beimpossible to design and deliversuch a course.

  • How to explain the failure?


2 bologna process and russian higher education

2. Bologna Process and RussianHigherEducation

  • Bologna Process: towards the EuropeanHigherEducationArea

  • Start: Bologna Declaration (June 1999)

  • Series of reforms to makeEuropeanEducationforstudents and scholars of othercontinents:

    • More compatible and comparable

    • More competetive

    • More attractive

  • Matching with the best performingsystems in USA and Asia

  • Threeoverarchingobjectivesfrom the start:

    • Threecycle system (bachelor / master / doctorate)

    • Qualityassurance

    • Recognitionof qualifications and periods of study


1 bologna process and russian higher education

1. Bologna Process and RussianHigherEducation

  • SomePriorities 2009 – 2019

    (Leuven Communiqué)

    • LifelongLearning

    • Employability

    • Student-centeredlearning and the teaching mission of HE

    • Education, research, and innovation

    • International openness

    • Mobility


1 bologna process and russian higher education1

1. Bologna Process and RussianHigherEducation

  • Top – Down process: governmentalinitiative

    • Bologna Processresults are limited

      • Culturalbarriers

      • Low level of international integration of the Russianeconomy

  • Bottom-upprocess: regionalprojects(Tacis / Tempus-Tacisprojects)

    • Impulseforfreedom of movement, modernization, and staffdevelopement

      (Telegina & Schwengel, 2012)


1 bologna process and russian higher education2

1. Bologna Process and RussianHigherEducation

Educationalist / instructional designer in between

Educationalist / instructional designer as a ‘ratman’


3 innovation projects in the netherlands

3. Innovationprojects in the Netherlands

  • 1. BlendedIT-projects : IT as tool in different kinds of learning environments (SURF)

    • Applying 4K resolution-video

    • Cooperativelearning with Google Docs

    • PersonalLearning environment

    • Platform forlearningusingsocialnetworks

    • Student communicationusing Google Apps

    • Mobile video conferencingfor international cooperationor in a special domain (care)

    • Reflective tools forstudychoice

    • Online masters

    • Virtualclassroom


3 innovation projects in the netherlands1

3. Innovationprojects in the Netherlands

  • 2. Activating, motivating and inspiringeducationforstudysuccess in bachelor

    • All kinds of pedagogical projects in facultycourses in order to promote:

      • motivation,

      • time-on-taskbehaviour,

      • deeplearning,

      • reallypracticing,

      • asking and using feedback,

      • preparing for assessment,

      • learning and usingsuccessfulstudyskills,

      • independent learning, etc.


3 innovation projects in the netherlands2

3. Innovationprojects in the Netherlands

  • Assisting in studychoiceprocess in secondaryeducation

  • Transition programs to HigherEducation

  • Academic and socialintegration

  • Study career counseling

  • International cooperation (mobility)

  • Choice modules

  • Student involvement in research projects (junior researcher)

  • Integrating labour marketforshorter and longerapprenticeships, lectures, visits, projects, assignments

  • Talent (honours) programs

  • Variants of Project Education en ProblemBasedLearning


3 innovation projects in the netherlands3

3. Innovationprojects in the Netherlands

  • 3. Assessment and testing: policy and tools

  • 4. Efficiency forteachers and students

    • Reducing teaching load

    • Efficientstudying (e.g. time management)

    • Efficientorganisation (schedule) of curriculum, courses, assesment, and information

  • 5. Usingevaluativeinformationsourcesforimprovement


3 innovation projects in the netherlands4

3. Innovationprojects in the Netherlands

  • 6. Staffdevelopment

    • Startingteachers

    • ‘Star’ teachers (the best)

    • PhD-students

    • Researchers

    • Students as peer teachers

    • Educational managers

    • Professors


4 mini multiple choice test

4. Mini multiple choice test

  • 1. Innovationprojectssuch as in Dutch HigherEducation are in myuniversity

    • A. possible (of course: with hard working and a lot of improvisation!)

    • B. possibleifthere is time and money

    • C. possibleifbesides time and money alsoorganizationalconditions are fulfilled

    • D. impossible, because management and the teaching staff are notinterested; a lack of aninnovative attitude

    • E. impossible, because of the economicsituation in Russia

    • F. impossible, becauseit is tooneo-liberal, Western-oriented

    • G. Other:…………………………………………………………………


5 three examples of innovative instructional design 1

5. Threeexamples of innovativeInstructional Design (#1)

  • Example 1: Discovering and Designing the relevant Competencesforcourses and a faculty program

    • TechnicalUniversities (NL)

      • System of criteria for bachelor and master in terms of competences (Meijers et al, 2003)

    • Universities of Applied Sciences (Higher Professional Education

      • HPE competences (HBO-Council, 2012)

  • Using the generalframework of competencesfordetermining the relevant competences in somecourse of program


5 three examples of innovative instructional design 11

5. Threeexamples of innovativeInstructional Design (#1)

  • AcademicCompetencesforHigherEducation

    • Disciplinarybaggage: disciplinaryknowledge, skills, and attitudes. Methods and techniiques of the field

    • Doing research: gainingknowledge and newinsights in a goal-orientedmethodicalway

    • Designing: establishment of neworamendedartefacts (e.g. policy; socialstructure, organization, ID, IT-tools) orsystems in order to solve a problem

    • Doingscience: insight in scientificmethods (includingmodeling), familiarity with the scientific body of thought with respect to intersubjectivity, realibility, etc.

    • Reasoning and reflecting: logicalreasoning and reflectingon thinking and acting in research and design

    • Cooperating and communicating: worktogether with and forothers

    • Looking back and lookingforward: takingdue account of the temporal dimensions, because views and methods have theirorigins and decisions beat theirconsequences in time


5 three examples of innovative instructional design 12

5. Threeexamples of innovativeInstructional Design (#1)

  • Each program / course has a certainprofile in these areas

  • Eachlearning target is substantiated in a list of criteria

  • Eachlearning target criteria are considered with respect to

    • Competence: does it concern knowledge, skill and/or attitude

    • Horizon: focus on discipline, itsscientificarea, itssocial context

    • Abstract / Concrete: does it concern specific cases or a general theory orapproach

    • Analytic / Synthetic: does it concern the analysis of a problem, or the making of a model, anapproachor a design

  • Questionnaire / interview

  • Visualization of the profile (radar plot)


Institutional and faculty development in higher education the strategic role of an educational center dr cees terlouw

Determination of the relevant competences


Institutional and faculty development in higher education the strategic role of an educational center dr cees terlouw

Determination of the relevant competences


5 three examples of innovative instructional design 2

5. Threeexamples of innovativeInstructional Design (#2)

  • Example 2: Designingfor a ‘class’ of competenceproblems

    • Learning to solvemethodically domain specificproblems (sciencecalculation and explanationproblems, design- and research problems)

    • Learning to communicate (oral and written)

    • Learning of professional competences

    • Learning of fundamentalknowledge in relation with project skills


5 three examples of innovative instructional design 21

5. Threeexamples of innovativeInstructional Design (#2)

Competence = Problemsolvingcycle

Competence=problemsolvingcycle


5 three examples of innovative instructional design 22

5. Threeexamples of innovativeInstructional Design (#2)

  • Seven core topics for ID in HigherEducationforlearningcompetences

    • 1. Orientingon a conceptualnetwork and on a methodicalapproach

    • 2. Operationalizingexplicit and implicitknowledge

    • 3. Practice with knowledge & skills with assigments, cases, etc. and using feedback given


5 three examples of innovative instructional design 23

5. Threeexamples of innovativeInstructional Design (#2)

  • 4. Assessinglearningresults: intermediate and final

  • 5. Utilizingsocietal, social and situationspecificcontexts in which the competencesshouldbeperformedforpractice and assessment

  • 6. Reflectiononlearningresults and learningprocess in order to improve the own learningapproach

  • 7. Phasinglearning the competence in the curriculum byutilizinglearninglines


5 three examples of innovative instructional design 24

5. Threeexamples of innovativeInstructional Design (#2)

  • Theoretical background

    • Vygotsky

    • Gal’Perin

    • Podolskij

    • Engeström

    • Social-Constructivism


5 three examples of innovative instructional design 3

5. Threeexamples of innovativeInstructional Design (#3)

  • Example 3: Designing a Learning Line forlearning to bean entrepreneur

    • Learningline with threeeducationalpartners in order to build up the competence

    • Competence ‘entrepreneurship’

    • Instructional and Learningarrangementsforlearning the competence

    • Assessment


5 three examples of innovative instructional design 31

5. Threeexamples of innovativeInstructional Design (#3)

  • (a) Learningline with threeeducational partners

Firms /Labour Market


5 three examples of innovative instructional design 32

5. Threeexamples of innovativeInstructional Design (#3)

(b) Competence of entrepre-neurship to bedefinedbasedon a model


Institutional and faculty development in higher education the strategic role of an educational center dr cees terlouw

5. Threeexamples of innovativeInstructional Design (#3)


5 three examples of innovative instructional design 33

5. Threeexamples of innovativeInstructional Design (#3)

  • (d) Assessment

    • Authenticsituation in which the competence must bedemonstrated

    • E.g.

      • Writing a business plan

      • Participating in simulation / roleplay

      • Founding and running a small online firm with an own product (for a period of time) + report


6 proposition

6. Proposition

  • Instructional Design concerns a systematicapproachfordurablysolving a problem in the educationalpractice with all practioners involvedtakinginto account the constraints at different levels of the educational system.


7 educational center

7. Educational Center

  • Expertise (master and PhD-level)

    • Instructional Design forcourses and curriculum

      • General / Domain specific

      • IT-applications

      • Relationships with others: schools, organisations in the labour market, internationalisation / mobility

    • Evaluation, Assessment & Testing

      • Tool design

      • Data analysis and reporting

    • Solving complex domain problems

    • Self Assurance / Accreditationprocess

    • Staffdevelopment


7 educational center1

7. Educational Center

  • Way of working

    • Practiceoriented, scientific: solving a problem in the educationalpractice with a scientificapproach

    • Joint projects with members of a facultygroupbasedon a policyassignment of the faculty management

    • Active lookingforregional, national, and international fundsfor the joint projects

    • Durablesolutions

    • Direct advice (help desk, using IT) and adviceon the short and long term


8 conclusions

8. Conclusions

  • 1. Institutes and facultiesshoulddevelopeducationally in order to be a real participant of the EuropeanHigherEducationArea;

  • 2. Instructional designers take a bottom-upapproach with the directlyinvolvedpersonstakinginto account top-downframeworks;

  • 3. Russianinstructional designers canuse ‘goodpracices’ fromotherEuropeancountries as aninspiration and a starting point for the own localsituation;

  • 4. An Educational Center with sufficient high level expertise is necessaryfordurable joint ID-projects.


9 general discussion

9. General Discussion


10 closing

10. Closing


Thanks for your attention cees terlouw e mail c terlouw @ saxion nl

Thanks for your attentionCeesTerlouwE-MAIL : [email protected]


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