Supporting faculty involvement in undergraduate research:  the graduate student role

Supporting faculty involvement in undergraduate research: the graduate student role PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Workshop agenda. Participants-what brought you here today?UNC-Chapel Hill GRC programUW Graduate Mentor programCase studies- what changes would need to be made to adapt these programs on other campuses?Reports and wrap-up. Participant introductions. Name, campus, role(s)What are you hoping to

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Supporting faculty involvement in undergraduate research: the graduate student role

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1. Supporting faculty involvement in undergraduate research: the graduate student role Patricia Pukkila, U. North Carolina-Chapel Hill Janice DeCosmo, U. Washington AAC&U Creativity, Inquiry and Discovery conference Durham, NC November 12, 2010

2. Workshop agenda Participants-what brought you here today? UNC-Chapel Hill GRC program UW Graduate Mentor program Case studies- what changes would need to be made to adapt these programs on other campuses? Reports and wrap-up

3. Participant introductions Name, campus, role(s) What are you hoping to take away from this workshop today?

4. GRC program elements Faculty apply for funds to support a Graduate Research Consultant (GRC) to transform a “course project” into a research project GRCs collaborate with faculty on the course research component and are paid for 30 hours/semester at the Teaching Assistant rate GRCs coach the undergrads on research design, appropriate methods, and communicating results RULE #1: Class time must be devoted to the projects of student inquiry RULE #2: GRCs coach and do not grade

5. An example from the social sciences-The sociology of Islam BEFORE Students were introduced to the importance, diversity, and recent transformations of the Islamic world Students reflected on their own and other belief systems through readings, discussions, and a term paper 50 students/class AFTER Students developed research skills, including interviews, surveys, analysis Class designed a survey concerning Americans' knowledge about and attitudes towards Islam and Muslims, administered over spring break, used as basis of term paper with coaching on SPSS from GRC

6. Other examples Cancer biology BEFORE: students gave oral reports on oncogenes AFTER: students met with the GRC to brainstorm about next experiments, so the reports focused on research proposals Reading and writing women’s lives BEFORE: students learned the genre of biography AFTER: the GRC coached the students on investigating primary resources, interviewing, and constructing an archive and the resulting biographies were contributed to the archive

7. GRC program assessment

8. How many faculty does it take to change a light bulb?

9. GRC program growth

10. Supporting Graduate and Post-doctoral Co-mentors of undergraduates at UW

11. Support for Graduate and Post-doc Co-mentors

12. Graduate co-mentor workshop themes

13. Graduate co-mentor workshop feedback

14. The spread of innovations

15. Case studies in adapting programs GRC program For faculty: Select an undergraduate course that could be changed to include a research component What is the nature of inquiry in this discipline? How might students experience these qualities in a course? If you changed the course, what would be the benefit? How might a GRC help? For administrators: How coordinate/publicize faculty effort? Funding Graduate Co-Mentor support For faculty and administrators - Identify campus need regarding graduate student mentors (i.e., training, structures/materials, recognition, etc.) and define steps to implement one of the strategies discussed. - Who are your campus partners in this effort? How can you draw in collaborators for efficiency/expertise? - How will you identify success? impact on undergraduate research?

16. Reports

17. Intended outcomes Describe program models Explore administrative approaches to encouraging inquiry-based approaches in courses Consider the implementation of strategies to improve the experiences of graduate students who mentor undergraduates Network with your colleagues

18. Thank you! Patricia Pukkila, U. North Carolina-Chapel Hill http://www.unc.edu/depts/our/faculty/faculty_grc.html [email protected] Janice DeCosmo, U. Washington Seattle http://www.washington.edu/research/urp [email protected]

19. Mentoring Resources Pfund, C., Pribbenow, C., Branchaw, J., Miller Lauffer, S., and Handelsman, J. (2006). The merits of training mentors, Science (311: 473-474). 2. Handelsman, J., Pfund, C., Miller Lauffer, S., and Pribbenow, C. (2005). Entering mentoring: A seminar to train a new generation of scientists.  The Wisconsin Program for Scientific Teaching, University of Wisconsin. 3. Keeling, S. (2003).Advising the millennial generation, NACADA Journal, 23 (1&2), 30-36. 4. MentorNet®: The E-Mentoring Network for Diversity in Engineering and Science National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine (1997) 5. Adviser, teacher, role model, friend: On being a mentor to students in science and engineering.Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.

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