Slide1 l.jpg
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 13

Dr. Robert Kokoska University Affiliated Research Center (UARC) Program Manager Army Research Office [email protected] 919-549-4342 PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 418 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

U.S. Army War College Strategic Implications for Emerging Technologies XX Annual Strategy Conference 15 April 2009 Panel I: Biotechnologies: Genetic Engineering & Molecular Biology Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies. Dr. Robert Kokoska

Download Presentation

Dr. Robert Kokoska University Affiliated Research Center (UARC) Program Manager Army Research Office [email protected] 919-549-4342

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Slide1 l.jpg

U.S. Army War College

Strategic Implications for Emerging Technologies

XX Annual Strategy Conference

15 April 2009

Panel I: Biotechnologies: Genetic Engineering &

Molecular Biology

Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies

Dr. Robert Kokoska

University Affiliated Research Center (UARC) Program Manager

Army Research Office

[email protected]

919-549-4342


Institute for collaborative biotechnologies icb l.jpg

Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies (ICB)

To identify and study fundamental mechanisms underlying

the high performance and efficiency of biological systems

and to translate these results to engineered systems

  • Awarded to UCSB in 2003, renewed in 2008

  • Alliance of UCSB, Caltech, MIT with Army & Industry Partners

  • Interdisciplinary R&D (molecular biology, chemistry, physics, engineering) at the interface between biotechnology & engineering

  • FY09 budget:6.1 - $9.5 M

    6.2 - $4.0 M

  • Mission: Accelerate Army transformation

    through biotechnology


Institute for collaborative biotechnologies icb3 l.jpg

Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies (ICB)

Biomolecular Sensors

Biosensor platforms with unprecedented sensitivity,

reliability, durability, compactness, integrability.

Materials and Energy

Use of biological and bio-inspired approaches toward

synthesis of improved electronic, magnetic, optical &

energy-dispersive materials.

Biotechnological Tools

Development of biotechnologies in molecular recognition,

signal transduction, molecular self-assembly, catalysts for

energy processes.

Bio-Inspired Network Science

Multi-scale modeling/simulation of the performance and

properties of biological components and networks.

Cognitive Neuroscience

Study of the neural basis of individual soldier variability

using brain imaging, genomics and modeling.


Institute for collaborative biotechnologies icb4 l.jpg

Selection

Aptamer Anatomy

14

10

unique molecules

8-15 Rounds

30

-

80 random

nucleotides

Amplification

PCR

Evolving

Priming

High Affinity Molecules

Population of

Site

Winning Molecules

Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies (ICB)

Microfluidic SELEX Technology

Prof. H. Tom Soh, UCSB

Objective

  • Develop ultrahigh efficiency, microfluidic SELEX system capable of rapidly generating specific, high-affinity reagents (DNA aptamers).

    Impact

  • The technology to generate DNA aptamers “on-demand” will allow capability to respond rapidly to new Chemical and Biological threat agents.


Institute for collaborative biotechnologies icb5 l.jpg

Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies (ICB)

Microfluidic SELEX Technology

Prof. H. Tom Soh, UCSB

  • Accomplishment

  • Utilizing ultrahigh purity microfluidic separation devices, PI demonstrated extremely rapid, single-round generation of high affinity DNA aptamers.

Single-Round Microfluidic SELEX Process

Lou, X., et al. PNAS (2009) 106: 2989-2994.


Institute for collaborative biotechnologies icb6 l.jpg

Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies (ICB)

Microfluidic SELEX Technology

Prof. H. Tom Soh, UCSB

  • Accomplishment

  • Utilizing ultrahigh purity microfluidic separation devices, PI demonstrated extremely rapid, single-round generation of high affinity DNA aptamers.

Lou, X., et al. PNAS (2009) 106: 2989-2994.


Institute for collaborative biotechnologies icb7 l.jpg

Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies (ICB)

Electronic Sensors for Rapid Detection of Threat Agents

Prof. Kevin Plaxco, Alan Heeger, H. Tom Soh UCSB

  • Objective

  • Development of electronically-based

  • sensing platform for biological detection.

  • Impact

  • Aptamer recognition elements enable

  • detection of nucleic acids, proteins, small

  • molecules, inorganic ions

  • Accomplishments

  • Smart electrode surfaces allow real-time detection of small

  • molecule analytes

  • Device integration: Real-time detection of mM cocaine conc.

  • in flowing, undiluted blood serum

  • Successful 6.2 transition to ARL-SEDD, Nanex LLC


Institute for collaborative biotechnologies icb8 l.jpg

Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies (ICB)

Improved Cellulases by Structure-Guided Recombination

Prof. Frances Arnold, Caltech

  • Objective

  • Apply SCHEMA recombination and modeling approach to improving a class of

  • enzymes, cellulases, that cannot be improved via standard directed

  • evolution methods. Focus is on enhanced enzyme stability.

  • Impact

  • Addresses need for distributed in theater fuel production

  • by utilizing cellulosic field waste.

  • Accomplishments

  • Constructed 23 novel, active cellulases with a wide range of thermostabilities.

  • The most thermostable cellulase has thirty times longer half-life at 63 C than that of the most thermostable parent cellulase.

  • Generated model to predict many chimeric sequences that have even higher thermostabilities.


Institute for collaborative biotechnologies icb9 l.jpg

Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies (ICB)

Non-Canonical Amino Acids in Protein Engineering

Prof. David Tirrell, Caltech

  • Objective

  • Exploit the chemistry of non-canonical amino acids to develop new apporaches to protein design, evolution and analysis

  • Impact

  • Provide new method for the study of host-pathogen interactions


Institute for collaborative biotechnologies icb10 l.jpg

Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies (ICB)

Non-Canonical Amino Acids in Protein Engineering

Prof. David Tirrell, Caltech

  • Key Accomplishments

  • Determination of crystal structure of methionyl-tRNA synthetase variant that activates azidonorleucine (Anl) for protein labeling

  • Demonstration of cell-selective protein labeling in mixed bacterial cultures and in mixtures of microbial and mammalian cells


Institute for collaborative biotechnologies icb11 l.jpg

  • Phage Display

  • Method for studying protein-peptide

  • and DNA-peptide interactions.

  • Large library of phage containing

  • randomized insertions in phage gene

  • encoding pIII is generated.

  • Library is incubated against desired

  • target; unbound phage are washed away.

  • Bound phage are eluted and enriched

  • by recycling.

  • Enriched peptides are sequenced.

Gene III insertion

Gene III

Peptide insert

expressed on pIII

Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies (ICB)

Screen for peptides that bind

inorganic battery materials!


Institute for collaborative biotechnologies icb12 l.jpg

Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies (ICB)

Stamped Microbattery Electrodes Based on Self-Assembled M13 viruses

Prof Angela Belcher, MIT

  • Electrodes exhibit full electro-

  • chemical functionality (voltage/

  • capacity, discharge capacity,

  • cylcing stability).

  • Microbattery electrodes can be

  • stamped onto flexible substrates.

  • Potential for providing power

  • for sensors in uniforms and field.

Pt Electrodes

Polyelectrolyte

+

=

Co3O4 nanowire electrodes

nanoparticles

Nam, et al., PNAS (2008) 105:17227-17231.


Institute for collaborative biotechnologies icb13 l.jpg

  • 2008 Metrics and Accomplishments

  • 53 ICB faculty

  • 49 post-docs supported

  • 95 graduate students supported

  • 33 faculty honors and awards

  • 38 doctorates awarded

  • 8 inventions disclosed

  • 118 peer-reviewed publications

Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies (ICB)

  • Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies

  • University of California at Santa Barbara working with

  • Academic Partners (Caltech, MIT)

  • Army Partners (ARL, RDECs, MRMC)

  • Industrial Partners

  • To accelerate the pace of Army transformation through biotechnology


  • Login