National Communications System NCS ESF 2 Training Conference    VoIP

National Communications System NCS ESF 2 Training Conference VoIP PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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National Communications System NCS ESF 2 Training Conference VoIP

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1. National Communications System (NCS) ESF #2 Training Conference VoIP/RoIP in Mission Critical Communications What you need to know now

2. Agenda Current situation – How IP is used today Solutions for emergency communications Emergency response requirements Comparison of alternatives by DHS interoperability level Real world examples The Future of RoIP and VoIP

3. Public Safety Requirements Solutions must: Maintain and enhance mission critical operations – public safety command & control, high-level security, 5-9s availability Be easy to use for day to day mission as well as special emergency events Cost effectiveness Interoperability Compatibility Interchangeability

4. Unique Public Safety Needs “Instant on” and always available Not having coverage impacts lives Have reliable integrated dispatch consoles Security from hackers and unauthorized users View communication device as work tool Functionally Ergonomic Rugged reduces “down time” Must last 12 hour shift Can’t be limited to one network Many of them And back upsMany of them And back ups

5. VoIP Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) is the routing of voice conversations over the Internet or through any other IP-based network One to one service Implementation requires a mechanism to ensure that data packets are delivered in sequential order and provide Quality of Service guarantees

6. Current IP Use in Radio Connects Radio Systems Allows different types of users to talk May not pass features Relies on central servers Does not improve coverage Best effort IP interoperability solutions are not interoperable amongst themselves

7. RoIP

8. IP is the Backbone of Today’s Communications

9. Commercial IP Can Satisfy Basic Requirements…

10. But more is needed for Mission Critical Communications

11. How VoIP is Used Now Use VoIP to allow dispatchers to communicate with each other. Could be within one dispatch center or between many separate dispatch centers ISSI Phase I - IP to Mission Critical Voice core (ISSI) ISSI Phase II - P25 Console Sub-System Interface (CSSI)

12. VoIP/RoIP Perspectives Per NIST Emergency Response (Public Safety) Perspective: To backup mission critical land mobile systems Has not been widely deployed in mission critical situations For dispatch to dispatch communications Using it to connect remote towers back to the main system Industry Perspective: For using radio control VoIP (primary and secondary) interoperability, to monitor radio channels Mobile command units sending VoIP over satellite Wide area systems – anywhere you have to distribute repeaters/radios beyond a typical microwave system To leverage IP networks to bridge new systems For microwave installations on radio systems To digitize voice for transport between locations

14. Interoperability According to Department of Homeland Security Last but certainly not least…with critical input from the public safety community, SAFECOM created the Interoperability Continuum as a tool for guiding efforts of local, tribal, state and federal policy makers addressing interoperability. A copy of the Continuum has been included in the handout packages for your reference. As you see, the Continuum identifies five critical elements of success – governance, standard operating procedures, technology, training and exercises, and usage of interoperable communications – that must be addressed to develop a sophisticated interoperability solution. In doing so, the Continuum allows public safety agencies to evaluate their progress in each of the five areas. The fact that the bands merge along the right side also underscores that these elements are interdependent. For example, if a local or regional agency procures new equipment (under the red band), it will need to plan training and conduct exercises before it can effectively use that equipment. The brochure you have in your packets provides even greater detail on each of the key elements. The Continuum is a living document that SAFECOM will update on an on-going basis. It is available our website at www.safecomprogram.gov. Last but certainly not least…with critical input from the public safety community, SAFECOM created the Interoperability Continuum as a tool for guiding efforts of local, tribal, state and federal policy makers addressing interoperability. A copy of the Continuum has been included in the handout packages for your reference. As you see, the Continuum identifies five critical elements of success – governance, standard operating procedures, technology, training and exercises, and usage of interoperable communications – that must be addressed to develop a sophisticated interoperability solution. In doing so, the Continuum allows public safety agencies to evaluate their progress in each of the five areas. The fact that the bands merge along the right side also underscores that these elements are interdependent. For example, if a local or regional agency procures new equipment (under the red band), it will need to plan training and conduct exercises before it can effectively use that equipment. The brochure you have in your packets provides even greater detail on each of the key elements. The Continuum is a living document that SAFECOM will update on an on-going basis. It is available our website at www.safecomprogram.gov.

15. Interoperability Techniques

16. Level 4: Gateway Hardware component that sits between two networks – Converts audio to VoIP protocol RF or wired audio links connect systems Provides audio only, no system specific features Slide 16Slide 16

17. State of Florida MOTOBRIDGE Phase 1 installed in 2004 229 MOTOBRIDGE dispatch positions throughout the State Over 800 resources and radio interfaces connected through the IP network

20. Security Privacy Only authorized people can understand the message Integrity You can tell if the message has been changed Authentication Making sure that a user is who they claim to be Authorization Only specifically authorized people can access the system(s) Non-repudiation When a user does something, there is legal proof that the user did it

21. Key Takeaways Three summary bullets … VoIP and RoIP are complimentary of P25 Mission Critical wireless networks utilize P25 Standards -1000 user defined features. There is a lot of work that needs to be done to utilize RoIP in a Mission Critical Network.

22. Thank You Todd Johnson, P.E. Customer Solutions Architect [email protected] 972-277-4685

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