14   19 Foundation Learning in Brighton  Hove   Working with vulnerable learners  learners with challenging behaviours

14 19 Foundation Learning in Brighton Hove Working with vulnerable learners learners with challenging behaviours PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 137 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Objectives of the session. To develop awareness and understanding of Foundation Learning To share an understanding of how to develop a Foundation Learning programme for the city's most vulnerable learners and those learners with challenging behaviours To explore delivery models of Foundation Learning that meet the needs of and are applicable to the city's most vulnerable learners and those learners with challenging behaviours To raise awareness and promote of the Project's Professional Frien20

Download Presentation

14 19 Foundation Learning in Brighton Hove Working with vulnerable learners learners with challenging behaviours

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


1. 14 – 19 Foundation Learning in Brighton & Hove “Working with vulnerable learners & learners with challenging behaviours”

3. Message for the day ‘If you are considering your delivery model for Foundation Learning and working with young people with challenging behaviours these are the things you need to consider’

5. In summary, how the VQ reform programme and the QCF relate to 14-19 curriculum and qualification reform. The 14-19 Qualification Strategy states: A clear and transparent qualifications framework is key to enabling all qualifications to be well understood. We believe that moving to a single credit-based framework for all 14-19 qualifications – presenting them in a way that is easier to understand, through comparing not only the level but also the size of different qualifications – could have significant benefits for young learners, supporting progression from one route to another and into adult learning. We plan to put forward more detailed proposals on how we will move 14-19 qualifications onto a credit-based framework, with a view to completing this move by 2013. It is very unlikely that considering the FLT, parts of the Diploma and Apprenticeships are part of the QCF the credit based framework referred to in the strategy will be a different one to the QCF. ‘Delivering 14-19 Reform: Next Steps ‘ – “To help achieve a streamlined qualifications system that works effectively and delivers value for money, we will introduce a new system to ensure that all publicly funded qualifications meet the needs of learners, employers and Higher Education. From December 2008, we are establishing a joint committee, Joint Advisory Committee of Qualifications and Approvals(JACQA) to advise the Secretary of State on this. It will also carry out biennial reviews of the14-19 qualifications system. And in 2013 we will complete a full review of how all publicly funded qualifications at that point are combining to meet the needs of young people, employers and universities.” In summary, how the VQ reform programme and the QCF relate to 14-19 curriculum and qualification reform. The 14-19 Qualification Strategy states: A clear and transparent qualifications framework is key to enabling all qualifications to be well understood. We believe that moving to a single credit-based framework for all 14-19 qualifications – presenting them in a way that is easier to understand, through comparing not only the level but also the size of different qualifications – could have significant benefits for young learners, supporting progression from one route to another and into adult learning. We plan to put forward more detailed proposals on how we will move 14-19 qualifications onto a credit-based framework, with a view to completing this move by 2013. It is very unlikely that considering the FLT, parts of the Diploma and Apprenticeships are part of the QCF the credit based framework referred to in the strategy will be a different one to the QCF. ‘Delivering 14-19 Reform: Next Steps ‘ – “To help achieve a streamlined qualifications system that works effectively and delivers value for money, we will introduce a new system to ensure that all publicly funded qualifications meet the needs of learners, employers and Higher Education. From December 2008, we are establishing a joint committee, Joint Advisory Committee of Qualifications and Approvals(JACQA) to advise the Secretary of State on this. It will also carry out biennial reviews of the14-19 qualifications system. And in 2013 we will complete a full review of how all publicly funded qualifications at that point are combining to meet the needs of young people, employers and universities.”

6. Foundation Learning It is a framework for learning; it is not a qualification in itself It is based on Personalised Learning Programmes that must encompass three distinct components: Subject or vocational knowledge, skills and understanding; Functional Skills in English, Mathematics and ICT; Personal and social development learning. And must be destination led…… Within the personalised learning programme PSD and vocational subject can be combined into one qualification. All qualifications used must come from the QCDA Foundation Learning Qualifications Catalogue It is a framework for learning; it is not a qualification in itself It is based on Personalised Learning Programmes that must encompass three distinct components: Subject or vocational knowledge, skills and understanding; Functional Skills in English, Mathematics and ICT; Personal and social development learning. And must be destination led…… Within the personalised learning programme PSD and vocational subject can be combined into one qualification. All qualifications used must come from the QCDA Foundation Learning Qualifications Catalogue

7. The Architecture of the Qualifications and Credit Framework Demonstrates level of challenge and size Use this slide to show how the QCF allows for greater flexibility in the design of Foundation Learning programmes. Explain that the QCF organises qualifications by level of difficulty and size. Difficulty is indicated by where the qualification is placed on one of 9 levels, ranging from entry level through to level 8. Size of qualification is indicated by a credit value where 1 credit equals approximately 10 hours of learning time. All qualifications are consistently titled so that it is immediately clear whether a qualification is small, medium or large. QCF units allow learners to gain accreditation in small steps or units. Each unit carries a credit value, usually between 1-6 credits, the awarding organisation determines how many credits are required to gain their Award, Certificate or QCF Diploma within the ranges shown on the graphic. It is a common misconception that the provider or learner can chose units from any awarding organisation body and build their own qualifications. This is not the case, the list of available units within a qualification is determined by the awarding organisation when the qualification is designed. The rules about which units are available and the combinations they can be used in are referred to as ‘rules of combination’. Within a Foundation Learning personalised programme qualifications can be selected: at different levels from different awarding organisations at different sizes. You may want to point out that there is a useful QCF presentation which participants can access at http://www.qcda.gov.uk/resources/qcf_interactive/index.htmDemonstrates level of challenge and size Use this slide to show how the QCF allows for greater flexibility in the design of Foundation Learning programmes. Explain that the QCF organises qualifications by level of difficulty and size. Difficulty is indicated by where the qualification is placed on one of 9 levels, ranging from entry level through to level 8. Size of qualification is indicated by a credit value where 1 credit equals approximately 10 hours of learning time. All qualifications are consistently titled so that it is immediately clear whether a qualification is small, medium or large. QCF units allow learners to gain accreditation in small steps or units. Each unit carries a credit value, usually between 1-6 credits, the awarding organisation determines how many credits are required to gain their Award, Certificate or QCF Diploma within the ranges shown on the graphic. It is a common misconception that the provider or learner can chose units from any awarding organisation body and build their own qualifications. This is not the case, the list of available units within a qualification is determined by the awarding organisation when the qualification is designed. The rules about which units are available and the combinations they can be used in are referred to as ‘rules of combination’. Within a Foundation Learning personalised programme qualifications can be selected: at different levels from different awarding organisations at different sizes. You may want to point out that there is a useful QCF presentation which participants can access at http://www.qcda.gov.uk/resources/qcf_interactive/index.htm

8. Where to find the FL Qualifications

9. What does Foundation Learning aim to do?

10. Personalisation Foundation Learning programme for Learner ‘X’

11. Functional Skills Functional skills are about identifying problems or challenges, selecting from the knowledge that we have, or knowing where to get it, and applying that knowledge to find effective solutions A key characteristic of functional skills is that they are based on a problem solving approach Learners who are ‘functionally skilled’ are able to use and apply the English/mathematics/ICT they know to tackle problems that arise in their life and work

12. Four approaches to delivery

13. Who is Foundation Learning for? Students in mainstream school, colleges and WBL Students with SEN Students in Pupil Referral Units Students with LLDD Young offenders …all learners at entry level or level 1 This slides flags up that Foundation Learning is not just for SEN pupils This slides flags up that Foundation Learning is not just for SEN pupils

14. Learners working predominantly at entry level or level 1. This could include learners: within school who will not achieve the current level 2 threshold at Key Stage 4 who are unsuited to GCSEs on Key Stage 4 Engagement Programmes who are at risk of disengagement engaged in alternative provision E2E learners on entry level and level 1 programmes at FE with learning difficulties and or disabilities.

15. Overall size of the Foundation Learning cohort In crude terms anyone student that does need achieve GCSE A-C incl English and Maths could potentially be Foundation Learner. It is not either GCSE or Foundation Learning you can blend the two In crude terms anyone student that does need achieve GCSE A-C incl English and Maths could potentially be Foundation Learner. It is not either GCSE or Foundation Learning you can blend the two

16. Excellence Gateway For further supportFor further support

18. Life Style Front Loading Support – taster days, support visits, texts, phone calls, letters, bus passes Food – breakfast and lunch clubs Staff who are trained to deal with students who present under the influence of substances or alcohol An understanding of the criminal justice system Settling in time Role modelling Opportunities for normalisation Realistic ideas about what can be achieved Recognition of distance travelled and soft outcomes A multi agency approach

19. SEN/LDD Knowing each learner’s specific needs and having appropriate strategies in place Intensive and tailor made input and programmes Liaison and communication with home and other agencies Good staff to pupil ratio Space Time tabling Fairness and respect – a shared understanding of this

20. Prior Learning Experiences / Teaching and Learning Styles Clarity around expectations, ground rules, and ways of working Setting clear expectations of learner and provider during induction Learner voice – “how do you feel, how do you learn?” Engage other students for peer support in the session Content of lesson and teaching needs to be related to life skills – how will they use it? Relevance of what they are learning to their life. Try to identify/assess the nature of their prior ‘bad’ experience Teach to address all learning styles Gain learner feed back – to inform continuous improvement

21. Personal Situation / Health / Family Good initial assessment and interview Interagency links / boundaries established Offer a safe space Include the student – they are the key Good communication and record keeping Good support network – family, friends, staff Good planning with the young people Know your stuff or know appropriate referral routes Be flexible and responsive Deliver specific targeted life skills

22. Low Self-Esteem / Confidence / Aspirations / Expectations Rapport is essential Achievable targets Awareness of outside issues – peers Positive role models Recognition of personal achievement Personalised learning Highlighting / mapping achievement Encouraging self reflection and positivity SMART targets Incentives / awards / certificates

23. Delivery models Roll on roll off Carousel Infill

24. Lesson Plan Examples

25. Activity

26. Checklist for planning implementation Does the pathway include Vocational, PSD and Functional skills? (if not, who will deliver the missing element/s?) Are the qualifications from the QCF? What induction and initial assessments have been built into the programme? Learning environments – how appropriate are the teaching spaces? What training is available for staff working on Foundation Learning within your organisation? What support/supervision is available for staff?

27. Checklist for planning implementation Learning styles and differentiation – how practical and interactive are the sessions? Is there individualised support available for learners? Who is the key worker? Who provides the pastoral support and monitors progress and attendance? Do the students have regular reviews? Who is involved in the review? Communication systems between partnerships and agencies – how is good communication maintained? Travel arrangements – how easy is it for students to get to each site?

28. Checklist for planning implementation What consistency does it offer the young person? How big is the group? What reward/ recognition schemes for achievement are in place? Session timings – is the length of the session appropriate to the learners and do the start and end times suit their needs? How long are breaks? Where can students go? Common room spaces?

29. Using PSD for the Pastoral Element Level 1 Award in Personal and Social Development (8 credits) Dealing with problems in daily life (2) Developing Self (2) Individual rights and responsibilities (1) Managing own money (2) Managing social relationships (2)

30. Professional Friend Scheme Links skilled and experienced workers with less experienced practitioners A Professional Friend is one who offers knowledge, insight, perspective, or wisdom that is especially useful to the other person. A city wide scheme that resides within Brighton & Hove Learning Partnership’s 14-19 Engagement Team Run from June 2010 to May 2011 (pilot)

31. Professional Friend Scheme 1st deadline for mentor applications is 30 April 2010 1st deadline for mentee applications is 14 May 2010 Training given and matching made in May Matched Professional Friends met in June and complete agreement

32. Further information

33. Evaluation We analyse forms for continuous improvement and to identify provider needs

  • Login