Good agricultural practices gap for fresh fruit and vegetable growers
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Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) for Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Growers. New England Extension Food Safety Partnership. Project funded by USDA CSREES – Project Number 2000-05389. Record Keeping. Documentation and Records. Who What When Where Why How. Who should keep records.

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Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) for Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Growers

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Good agricultural practices gap for fresh fruit and vegetable growers

Good Agricultural Practices (GAP)for Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Growers

New England Extension Food Safety Partnership

Project funded by USDA CSREES – Project Number 2000-05389

Record Keeping


Documentation and records

Documentation and Records

Who

What

When

Where

Why

How


Who should keep records

Who should keep records

  • Recommendation that processors maintain records

  • Documenting is important

    • Commitment to food safety

    • Ease of auditing by buyers/regulatory

    • In the event of a traceback – could indicate that source of contamination not on farm


What should be recorded

What should be recorded?

Useful records include detail!

  • Date and time

  • Worker

  • Activity

    • production

    • harvest

    • handling

  • Location (what field)

Useful records include detail!

  • Worker

  • Activity

    • production

    • harvest

    • handling

  • Location (what field)

Useful records include detail!

  • Date and time

  • Worker

  • Activity

    • production

    • harvest

    • handling

  • Location (what field)


What records to keep

What records to keep?

What records to keep?

  • Employee training

  • Water – quality, supply, treatment, monitoring

  • Temperature control

  • Equipment - monitoring, maintenance

  • Sanitation

  • Product batch processing

  • Carrier/distribution

  • Inspection - facility, production area


Why keep written records

Why keep written records?

  • Quality assurance

  • Traceback

  • Buyer requirement

  • Monitor

    • Food safety training

    • Food safety practices

    • Corrective actions


Resources

Resources

Record keeping examples presented are from Cornell National GAP Program educational materials:

www.gaps.cornell.edu/rks.html

Another resource for record keeping is University of Massachusetts Extension:

www.umassextension.org/nutrition/index.php/programs/food-safety/programs/good-agricultural-practices


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