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Head Restraint for Race Car Drivers. Aim Jirut and Asif Lala Advised by: Dr. Jackson Roberts. Background. Fatal neurological damage to the brain ensues after many high speed frontal race car collisions. 13 out of 202-- 1998 Race Car Major Deceleration Crashes were Front Impact Collisions.

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Head restraint for race car drivers

Head Restraint for Race Car Drivers

Aim Jirut and Asif Lala

Advised by:

Dr. Jackson Roberts


Background
Background

  • Fatal neurological damage to the brain ensues after many high speed frontal race car collisions.

  • 13 out of 202-- 1998 Race Car Major Deceleration Crashes were Front Impact Collisions.


Background cont
Background (cont.)

  • For everyday drivers, peak decelerations averaged from 40Gs to 60Gs.

  • For race cars, this peak deceleration maxed at 160 Gs

  • At Peak Decelerations of greater than 40 Gs, concussions are likely to ensue.


Project definition
Project Definition

Design, test, and build a prototype for a head restraint system for race cars during racing conditions.


Objectives
Objectives

  • Provide an Easy Escape Mechanism

  • Allow for Sufficient Lateral Visual Range of Motion

  • Provide Sufficient Protection at Maximum Speeds.

  • Be Constructed of Lightweight Materials

  • Be Compatible at Amateur and Professional Race Car Seat Dimensions


Possible solution models
Possible Solution Models

  • Current restraint systems are insufficient for preventing such injuries.

    • Air bags

    • 5-Point Harnesses

    • Helmets

  • Possible Model Solutions

    • Crushable Steering Column

    • Reverse Shock Absorbing Helmet

    • Bungee Cord

    • Shock Absorbing Lanyard*


Biomechanics of the problem
Biomechanics of the Problem

Parameters (Max)

Weight of Head: 8.2% Body Weight = 13lbs or 5.9 kg

Weight of Helmet: 3 lbs or 1.4 kg

Maximum Speed of Race Car: 230mph or 103 m/s

Time of Duration of Impact: 0.067s


Biomechanics cont
Biomechanics (cont.)

F=ma (Force of Impact on Car)

F= (1.4 + 5.9)kg * (103m/s)

0.067s

F = 7.3 kg * 1537 m/s2 <= 157 Gs

F = 11,220 N or 2,522 lbf


Biomechanics cont1
Biomechanics (cont.)

Parameters (Max)

Range of Movement of Torso: 50 degrees

(due to 5 point harness)

Range of Movement of Neck: 60 degrees

Force of Impact of Car: 11,220 N or 2,522 lbf


Biomechanics cont2
Biomechanics (cont.)

Fy=F*cos  y (Force of Torso)

F= 11,220 cos (50)

= 7,212 N

Fy=F*cos  y (Force of Head)

F= 7,212 cos (60)

= 3,606 N

Total force on brain = 7,212 N + 3,606 N

= 10,818 N


Importance
Importance

F = 10,818 N

From Nahum and Smith


Project idea
Project Idea

  • Shock Absorbing Lanyard Attached from Helmet to Roll Bar

From http://www.elkriver.com/zorber.htm


Role of the lanyard
Role of the Lanyard

Parameters using Lanyard (shock pack)

Force Needed to Initiate Tearing = 475 lbf (x2) = 4225 N Weight of Head: 8.2% Body Weight = 13lbs or 5.9 kg

Weight of Helmet: 3 lbs or 1.4 kg

Maximum Speed of Race Car: 230mph or 103 m/s

Time of Duration of Impact: 0.067s


Force calculation
Force Calculation

F=ma

4225 N = (1.4 + 5.9)kg * a

a = 579 m/s2

Therefore,

v = 579 m/s2 * 0.067 s

v= 39 m/s = 87 mph


Current status
Current Status

  • Awaiting Force Curves for Each Lanyard in order to compute amount of force decrease.

  • Find an Easy Escape Mechanism

  • Calculate proper locations for lanyard attachments.


Future work thru april
Future Work (thru April)

  • Order and Build Prototype


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