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Doing Differentiation !. John E. Lester, 2008. What is Differentiated Instruction”?. “Instruction that modifies the curriculum content, the teaching process or the student product according to individual student readiness, needs and/or interest.”. True “Differentiation”.

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doing differentiation

Doing Differentiation!

John E. Lester, 2008

what is differentiated instruction

What is Differentiated Instruction”?

“Instruction that modifies the curriculum content, the teaching process or the student product according to individual student readiness, needs and/or interest.”

true differentiation
True “Differentiation”
  • To truly differentiate – the KEY

part of the term is “different”.

  • Not more or less, but “different”!
  • Look for examples in “what you already do in the classroom”.
  • Call it what is!
  • The key to providing individualized instruction in the classroom.
  • ALL classes can be differentiated!
  • Everything you teach does not need to be differentiated.
why should teachers differentiate
Why Should Teachers Differentiate?
  • Academic Content Standards
  • Classrooms of diverse learners
  • NCLB – No Child Left Behind
  • Every child must show one year’s growth
  • Value-Added Assessment
  • Raise the bar for ALL students
  • Halt “Falling Through the Cracks” Syndrome
  • Provide EACH student with an OPPORTUNITY to learn and show growth!
how important is differentiation
How Important Is “Differentiation”?
  • Thousands of articles written.
  • Hundreds of books published.
  • Mainstream classroom.
  • FAQ in teacher interviews.
  • Part of teacher evaluation.
  • Need to know “how” in your classroom.
  • Need a “Differentiation Plan”.
making differentiation work
Making Differentiation Work
  • Understand the standards
  • Diagnose / pre-assess for student readiness and/or need.
  • Utilize student interest or choice when possible.
  • Create an atmosphere of “intrinsic motivation” in your classroom
  • Clarify the concept of “fairness” in your classroom.
types of differentiation
Types of Differentiation
  • Differentiation by Content

Study different materials with the same topic area but do the same activities.

  • Differentiation by Process

Study the same content but do different activities or use different processes of learning.

  • Differentiation by Product

Study the same content but do different activities that lead to different products. Students can also use same activities but create different products.

  • Differentiation by Negotiation

Study different materials with the same topic and do different activities.

  • Differentiation by Support

Study same materials and do same activities but receive different support from the teacher or from materials.

types of differentiation1
Types of Differentiation
  • Differentiation by Extension

Study the same materials and do same activities with extension work given to more able students upon completion of assigned work.

  • Differentiation by Response

Students are given open-ended assignments that can be interpreted at different levels. Can be based on Bloom’s Taxonomy levels.

  • Differentiation by Group Work

Students work together in mixed ability groups and help each other by working together to accomplish assigned tasks at different levels.

  • Differentiation by Gradation

Students work through activities that become progressively more difficult. Students complete activities at their own rate and own speed.

  • Differentiation by Role

Students are assigned different roles in a simulation for example based on their abilities, aptitudes and learning needs.

doing differentiation1
Doing Differentiation!
  • Stage 1 – Understanding Standards

What do I want students to KNOW and/or be able TO DO?

  • Stage 2 – Diagnosis / Pre-Assessment

Who already knows the information and/or can already do it?

  • Stage 3 – Differentiation Strategies

What can I do in order to allow students to make continuous progress and also extend and/or enhance learning?

stage 1 understanding standards
Stage 1Understanding Standards
  • What do I want students to KNOW and/or be able TO DO?
  • Defining academic content standards.
  • Recognizing “building blocks” in standards.
  • Locating “frequency” in the standards.
  • Identifying “rigor” in the standards.
stage 1 understanding standards1
Stage 1Understanding Standards
  • Defining academic content standards

Standards are open and public statements that clearly define what students SHOULD KNOW and be able TO DO in order to achieve at the highest levels in all academic areas.

in the age of standards
In the Age of Standards . . .

Changes Have Impacted Learning in all K-12 Classrooms!

stage 1 understanding standards2
Stage 1Understanding Standards

2. Identifying “building blocks” in the standards.

K-12 grade level SKILLS serve as the “building blocks” for what students “should know and be able to do” as they progress from grade to grade during their educational

career.

Horizontal VS Vertical View!

slide14

Identifying the “building blocks” in the standards

  • STANDARD - The State of Ohio
  • Social Studies – Citizenship Rights & Responsibilities
  • GRADE 6
  • 1. Explain how opportunities for citizens to participate in and influence the political process differ under various systems of government.
  • GRADE 7
  • 1. Explain how the participation of citizens differs under monarchy, direct democracy and representative democracy.
  • GRADE 9
  • 2. Describe and compare opportunities for citizen participation under different systems of government including:
  • A. Absolute monarchies
  • B. Constitutional monarchies
  • C. Parliamentary democracies
  • D. Presidential democracies
  • E. Dictatorships
  • F. Theocracies
stage 1 understanding standards3
Stage 1Understanding Standards
  • Locating “frequency” in the standards.

Frequency refers to the number of times an indicator or skill appears in the standards from grade to grade throughout a student’s “educational career”.

follow the frequency
Follow the Frequency

Key Questions?

  • Am I the first teacher to introduce this indicator/skill to students?
  • Is this indicator/skill being repeated from earlier grades?
  • Is this indicator/skill combined with another indicator/skill that was previously taught or mastered?
  • Am I the only teacher responsible for teaching this indicator/skill to this group of students?
slide17

Standards Frequency Map

I

Introduced.

I am the teacher responsible for introducing this Indicator/SKILL to students.

Repeated.

This Indicator/SKILL is being repeated from earlier grades or earlier learning situations.

Combined.

This Indicator/SKILL is being combined with another Indicator/SKILL that was learned earlier or introduced earlier.

Alone.

This Indicator/SKILL is a solo Indicator/SKILL, which means I am the only teacher in the student’s educational career responsible for teaching this Indicator/SKILL.

#

R

C

A

stage 1 understanding standards4
Stage 1Understanding Standards

4. Identifying “rigor” in the standards.

Rigor refers to the depth and breadth of learning indicated for each indicator or skill in the standards.

identifying rigor in the standards
Identifying Rigor in the Standards

The KEY to identifying “rigor” is found in Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Using the KEY words in the Taxonomy serves as a guide to identifying “rigor” in the skills found in the standards.

Evaluation

Synthesis

Analysis

Application

Comprehension

Knowledge

slide20

Bloom’s Taxonomy with KEY Association Words

Knowledge Level – Recalling previously learned material

KEY WORDS: define, state,label,list,name,recall,recognize,remember, describeOthers: find, identify, match, memorize, recite, record, relate, repeat, tell

Comprehension Level – Understanding the meaning of material

KEY WORDS: conclude, describe, estimate, extend, extrapolate, generalize, infer, predict, reorder, rephrase, use, summarize, translate, explain, interpretOthers: convert, discuss, locate, paraphrase, outline, restate, retell in your own words, report

Application Level – Using learned material in new situations

KEY WORDS: apply, choose, experiment, predict, relate, support, transfer, demonstrate, use, solveOthers: calculate, compute, construct, determine, dramatize, examine, illustrate, implement, manipulate, operate, show

Analysis Level – Breaking material into parts to understand organization and structure

KEY WORDS: analyze, break down; clarify, connect, discriminate, relate, compare, contrast, classify,compare, contrast, distinguish, inferOthers: appraise, categorize, deduce, determine (the factors), diagnose, diagram, differentiate, dissect, examine, experiment, question, investigate

Synthesis Level – Putting parts together to form new material

KEY WORDS:arrange, communicate, combine, compose, discover, perform, generalize, arrange, create, design, hypothesize,plan,produce, propose, writeOthers: construct, develop, formulate, generate, invent, originate, predict, pretend, rearrange, reconstruct, reorganize, revise, visualize

Evaluation Level – Judging the value of material for a given purpose

KEY WORDS: appraise, assess, critique, judge, evaluate, locate errors, compare to highest standard

Others: choose, compare, conclude, decide, defend, estimate, give your opinion, justify, predict, prioritize, rank, rate, select, support, value

rigor refers to the to do in the standards

Rigor refers to the TO DO in the standards.

Standards are open and public statements that clearly define what students SHOULD KNOW and be able TO DO in order to achieve at the highest levels in all academic areas.

slide22

Identify the “rigor” in the grade level indicator/SKILL in the standards

  • STANDARD
  • Social Studies – Citizenship Rights & Responsibilities
  • GRADE 6
  • 1. Explain how opportunities for citizens to participate in and influence the political process differ under various systems of government.
  • GRADE 7
  • 1. Explain how the participation of citizens differs under monarchy, direct democracy and representative democracy.
  • GRADE 9
  • 2. Describe and compare opportunities for citizen participation under different systems of government including:
  • A. Absolute monarchies
  • B. Constitutional monarchies
  • C. Parliamentary democracies
  • D. Presidential democracies
  • E. Dictatorships
  • F. Theocracies
slide23

Identify the “rigor” in the grade level indicator/SKILL for the lesson

  • Standard
  • Reading Applications – Informational, Technical & Persuasive Text
  • Grade Level Indicator
  • # 7
  • Reading Applications – Informational, Technical & Persuasive Test
  • Grade 4 – Distinguish fact from opinion
  • Grade 5 – Analyze the difference between fact and opinion
  • Benchmark(by the end of the 4-7 program)
  • B. Recognize the difference between cause & effect and fact & opinion to analyze text.
slide24

Identify the “rigor” in the grade level indicator/SKILL for lesson

  • Standard
  • Reading Applications – Literary Text
  • Grade Level Indicator
  • # 4 - Grade K – Distinguish between fantasy and reality.
  • # 5 - Grade K – Recognizepredictable patterns in

stories.

  • #3 - Grade 1 – Retell the beginning, middle and ending of a story, including its important events.
  • # 5 - Grade 1 – Recognizepredictable patterns in stories and poems.
rigor defined
Rigor Defined

Identifying rigor and using it in developing lessons allows students to develop the capacity to understand content that is complex and challenging!

stage 2 diagnosis pre assessment
Stage 2Diagnosis / Pre-Assessment
  • Who already knows the information and/or can already do it?
  • Defining diagnosis?
  • Diagnosis made easy.
  • Using diagnosis, pre-assessment or knowledge inventory.
slide27

Essential Questions?

  • Do my students NEED this lesson?
  • Are my students READY for this lesson?
slide28

In the real world, diagnosis is an integral part of life….It should be the SAME in the classroom!

diagnosis made easy
Diagnosis Made Easy!
  • Professional Pre-Assessment Instruments
  • Diagnostic Tools
  • Teacher Created Diagnostic Instruments
  • End of Chapter Test / Assessment
  • Class Discussion
  • Writing Exercises
  • Homework
  • Individual Student Assessment
  • Prior Knowledge of Student Work
  • Professional Judgment

Chapter 4

(Generating Standards-Based Lessons, Lester 2007)

slide30

When to Diagnose?

Introduce the material in the lesson or teach a partial lesson using the material BEFORE conducting the diagnosis.

Why? Because often times, students do not really know what they do or do not know!

This allows students to REFRESH, RECALL, and REMEMBER material they may have not used recently or may have not realized they actually understand.

stage 3 differentiation strategies
Stage 3Differentiation Strategies
  • What can I do in order to allow students to make continuous progress and also extend and/or enhance learning?
  • Differentiation Characteristics
  • Differentiation Strategies
  • Doing Differentiation!
differentiation characteristics
Differentiation Characteristics
  • All students have the opportunity to explore and apply key concepts of the subject/skill being studied.
  • Learning is focused on students who struggle, students working at grade level, and students who need advanced challenges.
  • Utilize student interest or choice when possible.
  • Varied learning options dominate the classroom.
  • On-going assessment and pre-assessment/diagnosis drives learning in the classroom.
  • Flexible grouping is consistently used in the classroom.
  • Students work alone, in pairs or in groups.
  • Sometimes lessons are readiness-based, sometimes interest-based, sometimes based on learning styles or student learning need.
  • Whole group instruction is used to introduce new ideas, planning activities and for sharing learning goals.
  • The teacher becomes the facilitator who guides active exploration during the learning process.
  • Students learn to set goals that lead to learning growth.
slide35

DIFFERENTIATING INSTRUCTION

Through Instructional Strategies

  • Bloom’s Taxonomy
  • Layered Lessons™
  • Anchoring Activities
  • Adjusting Questions
  • Learning Contracts
  • Curriculum Compacting
  • Independent Study
  • Lesson Acceleration
  • Lesson Deceleration
  • Buddy Study
  • Peer Teaching
  • Flexible Grouping
  • Learning Centers
  • Building Blocks
  • Technology Activities
providing learning opportunities differentiation strategies
Providing Learning OpportunitiesDifferentiation Strategies
  • Bloom’s Taxonomy
  • Layered Lessons™
  • Anchoring Activities
  • Adjusting Questions
  • Learning Contracts
  • Curriculum Compacting
  • Independent Study
  • Lesson Acceleration
  • Lesson Deceleration
  • Buddy Study
  • Peer Teaching
  • Flexible Grouping
  • Learning Centers
  • Building Blocks
  • Technology Activities
1 bloom s taxonomy
1. Bloom’s Taxonomy
  • Use the KEY words in the Taxonomy to guide lessons from the knowledge level to the evaluation level according to where the lesson should be taught in your state standards and/or according to student need following a careful diagnosis or pre-assessment.
  • Use the Taxonomy to design lessons that lead to acceleration or deceleration of lesson content.
  • Use the Taxonomy to design activities for students based on readiness, need and/or interest.
  • Use the Taxonomy as your guide to creative and challenging lessons.
  • Use the Taxonomy as your guide to designing assessments that match lessons and help students reach mastery of standards-based skills.
  • Involve your students in the Taxonomy and use it to explain learning, thinking, creativity, evaluating, and reaching goals.
slide38

Bloom’s Taxonomy with KEY Association Words

Knowledge Level – Recalling previously learned material

KEY WORDS: define, state,label,list,name,recall,recognize,remember, describeOthers: find, identify, match, memorize, recite, record, relate, repeat, tell

Comprehension Level – Understanding the meaning of material

KEY WORDS: conclude, describe, estimate, extend, extrapolate, generalize, infer, predict, reorder, rephrase, use, summarize, translate, explain, interpretOthers: convert, discuss, locate, paraphrase, outline, restate, retell in your own words, report

Application Level – Using learned material in new situations

KEY WORDS: apply, choose, experiment, predict, relate, support, transfer, demonstrate, use, solveOthers: calculate, compute, construct, determine, dramatize, examine, illustrate, implement, manipulate, operate, show

Analysis Level – Breaking material into parts to understand organization and structure

KEY WORDS: analyze, break down; clarify, connect, discriminate, relate, compare, contrast, classify,compare, contrast, distinguish, inferOthers: appraise, categorize, deduce, determine (the factors), diagnose, diagram, differentiate, dissect, examine, experiment, question, investigate

Synthesis Level – Putting parts together to form new material

KEY WORDS:arrange, communicate, combine, compose, discover, perform, generalize, arrange, create, design, hypothesize,plan,produce, propose, writeOthers: construct, develop, formulate, generate, invent, originate, predict, pretend, rearrange, reconstruct, reorganize, revise, visualize

Evaluation Level – Judging the value of material for a given purpose

KEY WORDS: appraise, assess, critique, judge, evaluate, locate errors, compare to highest standard

Others: choose, compare, conclude, decide, defend, estimate, give your opinion, justify, predict, prioritize, rank, rate, select, support, value

2 layered lessons
2. Layered Lessons™
  • Use the Layered Lesson™ Process to create lessons for:
    • Struggling Students – Students Working BELOW Grade Level
    • Ready Students – Students Working AT Grade Level
    • Able Students – Students Working ABOVE Grade Level
  • Create the Layered Lesson™ from the SAME skill/concept in the standards after introducing the skill/concept to ALL students and then conducting a careful diagnosis or pre-assessment to determine student needs.
  • Create activities or learning modules to accommodate student need based on the diagnosis/pre-assessment using the levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy as your guide.
  • Students share activities or work, reflect on learning, and receive feedback.
  • All students receive the SAME assessment to determine mastery of the skill/concept.
3 anchoring activities
3. Anchoring Activities
  • Activities available to students upon completion of assigned lessons or activities in the classroom.
  • Can be a list from which students choose.
  • Can be activities that provide enrichment, extension, acceleration or remediation.
  • Can be ongoing long term activities that students work on over a set period of time.
  • Can include activities such as journals, notebooks, reading, organizing materials, etc.
  • NOT to be confused with “busy work”.
  • Activities should be DIRECTLY related to classroom goals and skills or concepts in lessons.
  • Can be “student choice” type activities if monitored carefully by the teacher.
4 adjusting questions
4. Adjusting Questions
  • Target questions asked of the whole class to learning needs of students.
  • Ask specific questions to students at their learning levels designed to target their abilities and challenge them to think.
  • Use Bloom’s Taxonomy to design questions at various levels of learning. Use the key words as “target” words to develop questions.
  • Use Bloom’s Taxonomy to allow students to design their own research questions, project questions, or questions for discussion or assessment. Direct students to the levels and the KEY words.
  • Use same technique when writing questions for assessments – same number of questions, but some students receive questions at an “adjusted” level.
5 learning contracts
5. Learning Contracts

A learning contract is a written agreement between teacher and student that results in students working independently or in groups. The contract helps students to set daily, weekly, and long range goals while developing management skills.

Learning Contracts:

  • Allow flexibility to meet the needs of individual students.
  • Allow students to work a different levels.
  • Allow students to concentrate on skills or concepts based on need and/or readiness.
  • Allow students the freedom to integrate interest or choice into projects or activities.
  • Motivate students during the learning process.
  • Allow students to become involved in “self-directed” learning.
slide43
Learning Contracts can be designed for numerous needs, can have numerous styles, and be used in any subject area and at all grade levels.

BEFORE

  • Conduct a diagnosis or pre-assessment of skill/concept.
  • Use a KWL Chart (What I KNOW, What I WANT to know, What I LEARNED).

DURING

  • Monitor student work.
  • Hold conferences with students (individually or group).
  • Evaluate progress (use checklists and/or rubrics).
  • Renegotiate the contract if necessary.
  • Grade progress daily or over time to provide motivation (short cycle).

AFTER

  • Grade for completion
  • Feedback to students (individually or group).
  • Student reflection or self-evaluation.
learning contracts implementation ideas
Learning Contracts - Implementation Ideas
  • Use the same contract for all students.
  • Design the contract so students will learn the basic skill(s) or concept(s).
  • Once students begin work allow them to negotiate changes to the contract based on need. (Renegotiation)
  • Allow students to work together based on negotiations.
  • Allow students to choose “options” in the contract and work in groups based on selected “options”.
  • Teach mini-lessons to ALL students that relate to the work in the contract .
  • Use easy to follow directions and instructions.
  • Use checklists and/or rubrics to help pace work and give students feedback.
  • Use grades or rewards to keep students motivated as they complete contracts.
  • Require some “individual” work in the contract if using groups to work on contracts.
  • Get parents involved as needed.
  • Allow students to design their own contracts in the future based on the current contract.
  • Allow students to sub-contract with “experts” for help or advice on completing their contracts. Good to use with those who complete their contracts early.
6 curriculum compacting
6. Curriculum Compacting
  • Compacting the curriculum means assessing a student’s knowledge and skills and providing alternative activities for the student who has already mastered these skills or concepts.
  • Compacting can be done on an individual basis or on a group basis.
  • Use diagnostics or pre-assessments to determine mastery.
  • Can be done from lesson to lesson, a unit or chapter basis, for a grading period, or for the entire year.
  • Can be used to allow students who “know” the material to move on to other activities while those who need instruction work on achieving mastery.
  • Can be used to determine use of “differentiation” strategies.
  • Can be used to determine vertical mastery of skills/concepts in the standards.
  • Can be used in all subject areas and at all grade levels.
7 independent study
7. Independent Study

To allow students to develop skills for independent learning and/or to study topics of interest to the student.

A differentiation strategy that allows students to follow “student interest” in learning about topics/concepts.

Often “student interest” can be used to motivate students who are difficult to reach or to allow advanced students to study topics at greater depth.

Can use a Student Interest Survey to determine interest or allow students to help develop study topics.

Can be used as Anchoring Activities or designed as Learning Contracts.

ALL students should have the opportunity to complete an Independent Study at least once during the school year and as often as possible.

The IS can be simple, complex, multi-faceted, cross-curricular in nature, used for remediation, extension, acceleration or enrichment.

lesson acceleration
Lesson Acceleration

9. Lesson Deceleration

  • Accelerating (moving faster) or Decelerating (moving slower) the PACE that students move through lessons is a method of differentiation. Students needing a higher level of competence can work faster through the lesson while students experiencing difficulties with the lesson many need to work slower or have adjustments made to the lesson in order to experience success.
10 buddy study
10. Buddy Study
  • Assigning student buddies to work together on a lesson.
  • Successful with younger students specifically with reading assignments.
  • Can be used at all grade levels in all subject areas.
  • Buddies can be on the same level if needed or buddies can be on different levels.
  • Allows for students to work independently away from the teacher but not working individually.
  • Good to use when students have finished assigned work.
  • Ideal for cooperative learning situations in the classroom.
  • Can develop a “Buddy Study” reflection page or journal page for students to record WHAT they accomplished in the “Buddy Study”.
  • Can be used in conjunction with other differentiation strategies.
11 peer teaching
11. Peer Teaching
  • When a student has knowledge beyond his/her peers, this student can become the “Student Expert” and can teach other students in a one-on-one basis or in a group situation.
  • This “Student Expert” can become the teacher of the skill/concept and gain valuable experience and self-confidence while teaching to others.
  • Students can apply for this position. They would then be required to demonstrate they have the knowledge necessary to be the teacher or students who are advanced in the subject area may take on this role.
  • This is valuable for “gifted students” who may need to build self-confidence or social skills working with other students.
12 flexible grouping
12. Flexible Grouping
  • Use grouping to accomplish the task of differentiation.
  • All types of grouping can be used in the classroom including: cluster grouping, instructional grouping, cooperative grouping, mixed-ability groups, ability groups, and the list goes on and on.
  • Use the type of grouping you are most comfortable with using to get the results you need as a teacher.
  • Pros and cons of grouping have been debated for many years.
  • You must use some type of grouping to accomplish differentiation unless you plan individually for each child.
  • Different combinations of grouping can be used in the classroom.
  • Always KEEP the door open for a child to move from one group to another if you are using “ability type” groups.
  • Do not use the SAME type of grouping on a continual basis.
  • Explain to students WHY they are in groups.
  • Be flexible with grouping in your classroom.
  • Group work can be recorded in journals, notebooks, etc.
  • Group members can have assigned TASKS within the group.
13 learning centers
13. Learning Centers
  • Where have all the learning centers gone?
  • Outstanding method of implementing differentiation in the classroom – tasks in the centers MUST be differentiated.
  • Centers can contain “compulsory activities” and “optional activities”.
  • Both of these types of activities can be differentiated or compulsory can be differentiated and optional can be based on interest.
  • Compulsory can be same activities for all students then optional activities can be differentiated or based on interest with a certain number of activities required for all students.
  • Technology can be used in the learning centers to make them come alive for students.
  • Create exciting centers to motivate students to want to spend time at the centers.
  • Centers can be simple or complex as needed or wanted.
14 building blocks
14. Building Blocks
  • Since the skills/concepts in the standards are a series of “building blocks” that students must know and be able to do to be successful in their “educational careers”, often differentiation involves restoring, replacing or putting these building blocks in place.
  • If after a diagnosis/pre-assessment you notice that a student cannot be successful on a task or lesson as a result of “building blocks” that are missing, it is important to design tasks or lessons to help the student gain this needed knowledge to be successful.
  • These “building blocks” are extremely necessary in subjects that are linear or vertically aligned from year to year, such as reading, writing, and math.
  • Understanding the standards allows you to see the connections from year to year and looking vertically at the skills needed to be mastered allows you to see the importance of differentiating lessons to help restore, repair or establish these “building blocks”.
  • Many of the other differentiation strategies can be used to establish needed “building blocks”.
15 technology activities
15. Technology Activities
  • Use technology to enhance lesson content.
  • Use technology to differentiate lessons for all types of learners.
  • The INTERNET or computer software programs allow instant access to remediation, enrichment, and acceleration of lessons.
  • Can provide skill building lessons and resources for research.
  • Can be used for assessment or diagnosis/pre-assessment of needs.
  • Opens up the world to students in terms of learning locally and globally.
  • Allows students to recognize, reorganize, and represent all types of data.
  • Don’t forget the use of cameras, game devices, and even cell phones.
  • Use of smart boards and other classroom devices add excitement to learning.
  • Students live in a word filled with technology even at a young age.
  • Students today are growing up in a technology faceted world that becomes more advanced each day and our classrooms need to keep pace as much as possible.
  • Use on-line courses or on-line tutoring when needed and possible.
instructional differentiation inventory
Instructional Differentiation Inventory
  • A pre-assessment or diagnostic instrument is used at the beginning of a unit, chapter or grading period to determine abilities of students in the class.
  • Evidence of a pre-assessment, a skills inventory, or a diagnostic tool used to determine need for the individual lesson.
  • The lesson is based on SKILLS in the state standards.
  • Bloom’s Taxonomy elements are recognized and used in the lesson.
  • Students engaged in activities based on readiness and/or instructional need.
  • Students have individual and/or group learning goals and understand what an “A” looks like.
  • Students are provided with efficient instruction and encouragedto ask questions regarding learning outcomes.
  • The needs of students who may struggle with the lesson are addressed.
  • The needs of students who are more able and may need enrichment or extensions to the lesson are addressed.
  • The reading level of each student is addressed or recognized by the teacher.
instructional differentiation inventory1
Instructional Differentiation Inventory

11. Instructional formats such as small group, individual work, partner work, teamwork, and whole group work embracedin the classroom.

12 Assessment of the lesson is aligned with the lesson material and Bloom’s Taxonomy.

13. Students are provided with time to reflect on learning following the lesson.

14. Feedback to students is provided on an individual or group basis following the lesson.

15. Assessments are used to reinforce instruction with students.

16. Authentic assessments such as rubrics are utilized.

17. The physical classroom itself embodies an engaging learning environment.

18. Students are encouraged to think critically and/or engage in higher level thinking skills.

19. A spirit of independent learning and a passion for learning is embraced.

20. Technology is incorporated or utilized in the classroom as warranted.

TOTAL POINTS

slide56

CONTACT INFORMATION

[email protected]

John E. Lester, Consultant

Lester & Associates Educational Consulting

Ohio Leadership Institute – www.ohioleader.com

Phone: 1-888-878-LEAD

E-Mail: [email protected]

Materials: Pieces of Learning, Inc. – www.piecesoflearning.com

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