prediction of the separation efficiency of a 10 mm hydrocyclone using light liquid phase particles
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
S. Austin, J. Williams, S. Smith and G. D. Wesson

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 35

S. Austin, J. Williams, S. Smith and G. D. Wesson - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 61 Views
  • Uploaded on

Prediction of the Separation Efficiency of a 10 Mm Hydrocyclone Using Light Liquid Phase Particles. S. Austin, J. Williams, S. Smith and G. D. Wesson. Department of Chemical Engineering FAMU-FSU College of Engineering Tallahassee, FL 32310. Presented at:

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' S. Austin, J. Williams, S. Smith and G. D. Wesson' - oren


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
prediction of the separation efficiency of a 10 mm hydrocyclone using light liquid phase particles

Prediction of the Separation Efficiency of a 10 Mm Hydrocyclone Using Light Liquid Phase Particles

S. Austin, J. Williams, S. Smith and G. D. Wesson

Department of Chemical Engineering

FAMU-FSU College of Engineering

Tallahassee, FL 32310

Presented at:

8th Annual International Petroleum and Environmental Conference

Houston, TX

November 6-9, 2001

presentation outline
Presentation Outline
  • Motivation
  • Hydrocyclone principles
  • Particle separation theory
  • Hydrocyclone performance measurements
  • Separation experiments
  • Results
  • Conclusions and future work
  • Acknowledgements
motivation
Motivation
  • Oil production requires water treatment.
  • Required offshore constraint

< 30 ppm of oil in water to environment

  • Interest in down-hole separation
hydrocyclone operation principles
Hydrocyclone Operation Principles
  • Tangential feed entry
  • Creation of core vortex
  • High local accelerations
  • Complex internal flows
  • No moving parts
liquid particle fluid interaction
Liquid Particle -Fluid Interaction
  • Liquid particles remain spherical
  • Particle diameter < 50 microns
  • Rep <0.1 , i.e. creeping flow
  • Incompressible fluids
particle motion
Terminal velocity

Separation is a function of:

Density difference

Particle size

Continuous phase viscosity

Cyclone diameter

Local accelerations in 10mm cyclone may approach 10,000 g

Particle Motion
measuring the performance
Measuring the Performance
  • Many ways to measure hydrocyclone performance
    • Due to different applications
  • “Traditional” separation measurement:

QOCOfO(l)

QFCF fF(l)

QUCU fU(l)

separation efficiency
Separation Efficiency
  • Efficiency based on total fraction of concentration reduction or:
  • Equivalent to “traditional” efficiency measurement
separation theory
Separation Theory
  • Grade underflow purity coefficient-separation efficiency for each particle size
  • Integrating over sizes yields overall separation efficiency
grade efficiency curve
Grade Efficiency Curve
  • Continuous function of particles sizes
  • Hydrocyclone performance is size dependent and GEC varies with particles size
  • Graphically represented as curve that is usually ‘S’ shaped
  • “Overall” separation efficiency is a result of the integration of the product of the GPC and the feed distribution
grade efficiency curve1
Grade Efficiency Curve

Wesson & Petty 1994

10mm hydrocyclone
10mm Hydrocyclone

2.5 mm

2.5 mm

80 mm

10 mm

1 mm

experimental flow loop
Experimental Flow Loop

hydrocyclone

Stirrer

Sample

Cylinders

tank

pump

flow predictions
Flow Predictions
  • Feed pressure varied from 60 - 160 psig
  • Flow rates determined using stopwatch
  • Linear regression

Qf = f(Po, Pu)

experiment
Determine optimum conditions which will give the best separation efficiency

Compare concentration separation efficiency with traditional way of determining efficiency.

Experiment
model dispersion
Soda Lime Borosilicate Glass glass bubbles and water :

r = 0.1 g/cm3

c = 1 cp (Cannon-Fenske viscometer)

lmean = 30 mm

Model Dispersion
results
Results

Conc vs. oil droplet sizes at 60 psi pressure drop

results1
Results

Conc vs. oil droplet sizes at 60 psi pressure drop

results2
Results

Grade Purity Function vs. Diameter – 4.85 lpm

results3
Results

Overall efficiency vs. Feed flow rate

conclusions
Conclusions
  • Glass bubbles-water separation
    • Best overall efficiency for feed distribution occurs 4.8 lpm feed flow rate (DP=200 psi)
    • L50 = 10 mm
model dispersion1
Vegetable oil dispersion in water:

r = 0.1 g/cm3 (pycnometer)

d = 50 cp (Cannon-Fenske viscometer)

c = 1 cp (Cannon-Fenske viscometer)

  30 dynes/cm (Pendant drop method)

Model Dispersion
results4
Results

Conc vs. oil droplet sizes at 60 psi DP

results5
Results

Conc. vs oil droplet sizes at 160 DP

concentration g curves
Concentration G-curves

Grade Purity Coefficient vs. Oil droplet diameter at various flow rates

L/min

best GPC-curve

“Drop Breakup”

results6
Results

The best “overall” efficiency?

conclusions1
Conclusions
  • Oil-Water separation
    • Best overall efficiency for feed distribution occurs 3.0 lpm feed flow rate (DP=60 psi)
    • Best GPC curve occurs at 3.7 lpm feed flow rate (DP=100 psi)
continued work
Continued Work
  • Investigate drop breakup
  • Investigate source of ‘fish hook”
  • Investigate use of back pressure to eliminate the air from the core vortex
ad