Equity valuation and analysis with eval
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Equity Valuation and Analysis with eVal. Chapter 10 Valuation. Framework for Business Analysis and Valuation. Key Valuation Inputs. Cost of Capital Forecast Financial Statements Value of Contingent Equity Claims. Alternative Approaches to Valuation. Discounted Dividends

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Equity valuation and analysis with eval

Equity Valuation and Analysis with eVal

Chapter 10

Valuation


Equity valuation and analysis with eval

Framework for Business Analysis and Valuation


Key valuation inputs

Key Valuation Inputs

  • Cost of Capital

  • Forecast Financial Statements

  • Value of Contingent Equity Claims


Alternative approaches to valuation

Alternative Approaches to Valuation

  • Discounted Dividends

  • Discounted Free Cash Flow

  • Discounted Residual Income

  • Earnings Multiples and Related Heuristics


Dividend discounting model

Dividend Discounting Model

where

P0 = equity value at the end of period 0

Divt = net cash distributions to equity at the end of period t

re = cost of equity capital


Equity valuation and analysis with eval

Problems With Discounting Dividends

  • Most growth companies pay no dividends, and may plan not to pay dividends for many years

  • Most companies reinvest a large proportion of their earnings rather than paying them out as dividends

  • Dividends measure wealth distribution rather than wealth creation


Traditional discounted free cash flow model to all investors

Traditional Discounted Free Cash Flow Model (to All Investors)

where

P0 = equity value at the end of period 0

FCFt = free cash flows to debt and equity holders during period t

rW = weighted average cost of capital

Debt0 = value of debt at the end of period 0


Equity valuation and analysis with eval

Discounting Free Cash Flows to Equity

where

P0 = equity value at the end of period 0

FCFEt = free cash flows to equity holders during period t

re = cost of equity capital


Equity valuation and analysis with eval

Problems With Discounting Free Cash Flows

  • Cash flows are difficult to forecast because they depend on the timing of events that do not have a big impact on value (e.g., timing of equipment/inventory purchases)

  • For growth companies, cash flows may be negative for many years to come

  • Cash flows provide a noisy and untimely measure of firm performance


Discounted residual income model

Discounted Residual Income Model

where

P0 = equity value at the end of period 0

NIt = net income for period t

re = cost of equity capital

CEt = book value of common equity at the end of period t


Equity valuation and analysis with eval

Discounting Residual Income to All Investors (Debt and Equity)

where

P0 = equity value at the end of period 0

NOIt = net operating income (after taxes)

rW = weighted average cost of capital

NOAt = net operating assets at the end of period t

Debt0 = value of debt at the end of period 0


Two stage discounted residual income model used in eval

Two Stage Discounted Residual Income Model (used in eVal)

where

P0 = equity value at the end of period 0

NIt = net income for period t

re = cost of equity capital

CEt = book value of equity at the end of period t

g = constant terminal growth rate in residual income beyond period T+1


Equity valuation and analysis with eval

Advantages of Discounting Residual Income

  • Unlike dividends and cash flows, earnings provide a reasonably reliable and timely measure of firm performance

  • Accounting analysis and ratio analysis provides a framework for evaluating earnings performance

  • Most practicing investors seem to use earnings to evaluate equities


Equity valuation and analysis with eval

Discounted Residual Income Model Focuses on Key Value Drivers

This expression indicates that value is created by:

1.Generating a long-run ROE that exceeds the cost of capital (focus on profit margin and asset turnover)

2.Growing the size of the investment base on which the ROE is generated (focus on sales growth)


Subsequent performance for firms with extreme residual income

Subsequent Performance for Firms With Extreme Residual Income


Bottom line on valuation models

Bottom Line on Valuation Models

  • Discounted dividends, discounted free cash flow and discounted residual income are all theoretically valid valuation models.

  • Your valuations should always be based on a complete and consistent set of forecast financial statements, in which case you will get the same value regardless of the valuation model used.

  • Your forecast horizon must extend out far enough that you reach a constant terminal growth rate in the flow that you are discounting – at which point you can make a terminal value computation.


Valuation using price multiples

Valuation Using Price Multiples

  • Examples include price-earnings, enterprise value-sales and market-book multiples.

  • A popular heuristic is the ‘PEG’ Ratio, which uses an earnings multiplier that equals the long-run expected growth rate in earnings.

  • The major problem with these approaches is that they implicitly make restrictive assumptions that are very often unrealistic.

  • We will explore determinants of common valuation multiples in session 19.


Contingent claims on equity

Contingent Claims on Equity

  • Value to Existing Equity Holders

    = PV of FCF to Common Equity

  • Value of Contingent Claims on Common Equity

  • In building your free cash flow forecasts, assume that all future expenses are ultimately paid for in cash or stock and not with contingent equity claims.

    • Note that FAS123R essentially does this for employee stock options, in that it requires an expense equal to the estimated cash value of the options granted

    • but we don’t currently have similar accounting for convertible bonds


Valuation example

Valuation Example

  • EnCom Corporation Stage 3

    • Illustrates equivalency of valuations using the DCF Model and the Residual Income Model

    • Illustrates how accounting distortions can change the sequence of residual income, but not the value of the firm.


Solution double click to see computations

Solution (double click to see computations)


Stage 3 questions

Stage 3 Questions

2.In question 1 above, you should have arrived at the same valuation regardless of the accounting method employed. Provide a qualitative explanation as to why the different accounting methods have no impact on the valuation.

The accounting technique selected has no effect on cash flows or dividends, and hence has no impact on the valuation. Note that conservative accounting leads to low residual income in earlier years and high residual income in later years. Conversely, aggressive accounting leads to high residual income in earlier years and low residual income in later years.


Upcoming cases

Upcoming Cases

  • Overstock.com E

    • Critical evaluation of analyst valuation. What are the implicit assumptions and are they reasonable?

    • Conduct your own valuation of Overstock.com using eVal. Focus on sales growth and ROE as the key drivers of value.

  • Evaluating Intel’s Earnings Torpedo

    • Understand why a small reduction in earnings can lead to a large drop in price.

  • The Restaurant Industry in 2003

    • Understanding the determinants of common valuation ratios.

  • The AOL Time Warner Merger

    • Illustrates how value can be created and destroyed through financing transactions


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