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Bellringer. In your own words, define how you use Gender Criticism to explore a novel. . AP Literature and Composition. “It’s a Wide-Arching Wednesday !” December 19, 2012 Mr. Houghteling. AGENDA . Anticipation Guide

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Bellringer
Bellringer

  • In your own words, define how you use Gender Criticism to explore a novel.


Ap literature and composition

AP Literature and Composition

“It’s a Wide-Arching Wednesday!”

December 19, 2012

Mr. Houghteling


Agenda
AGENDA

  • Anticipation Guide

  • The plan from here: Sula, literary criticism, and close textual readings.

  • Background information related to Sula.

  • If time allows, begin reading the novel.


Bellringer gender critical perspective
Bellringer: Gender Critical Perspective

  • Gender interpretation focuses on relationships between genders, including patterns of thought, behavior, and power in relations between and within the sexes.

  • For example, a gender reading of Cinderella may take into account the idea of power relationships between the men and women of the novel.


Do you remember
Do you remember?

  • Gender Criticism

  • Archetypal Criticism

  • Historical Criticism


Archetypes
Archetypes

  • Archetypes are universal symbols.

  • These symbols “carry the same or very similar meanings for a large portion of mankind” (Philip Wheelwright, Metaphor and Reality).


Myth and archetype
Myth and Archetype

  • Myth is universal.

  • Similar motifs or themes may be found among many different mythologies.

  • Certain images or associations recur in the myths of people widely separated in time and place, and these images often have a common meaning or elicit comparable psychological responses.


Myth and archetype1
Myth and Archetype

  • “The myth critic is concerned to seek out those mysterious elements that inform certain literary works and that elicit, with almost uncanny force, dramatic and universal human reactions” (Campbell, The Masks of God).


Archetypal criticism 1
Archetypal Criticism (1)

  • Archetypal criticism argues that archetypes determine the form and function of literary works, that a text's meaning is shaped by cultural and psychological myths. Archetypes are the unknowable basic forms personified or solidified in recurring images, symbols, or patterns.


Archetypal criticism 2
Archetypal Criticism (2)

  • These patterns may include motifs such as the quest or the heavenly ascent, recognizable character types such as the trickster, the mentor, or the hero, symbols such as the apple or snake, or images such as crucifixion (as in Cool Hand Luke, or Bride of Frankenstein) or baptism (as in The Awakening)—all laden with meaning already when employed in a particular work.


Historical criticism 1
Historical Criticism (1)

Historical Criticism insists that to understand a literary piece, we need to understand the author's biography and social background, ideas circulating at the time, and the cultural environment.


Historical criticism 2
Historical Criticism (2)

  • New Historicism seeks to find meaning in a text by considering the text within the framework of the prevailing ideas and assumptions of its historical era. New Historicists concern themselves with the political function of literature and with the concept of power, the intricate means by which cultures produce and reproduce themselves.


Where do we go from here
Where do we go from here?

As we read, we will apply historical, gender, and archetypal criticism to the text.

We will focus on Morrison’s use of characterization, setting, and symbolism, specifically her use of archetype and allusion to develop those literary elements.


Before you begin reading
Before you begin reading:

To utilize historical criticism, we must understand the time period in which a text was written.

Sula was published in 1973.

What was going on in the US in 1973?


To better understand
To better understand:

The first few pages (pp. 3-6) are written from the perspective of 1973.

The novel then goes back to 1919 (World War I).

The majority of the novel takes place in the 1920s, but it was written in 1973. We must be aware of both eras’ presence in the novel.


Characterization
Characterization

  • What the character says and doesn’t say.

  • What the character does and doesn’t do.

  • Physical appearance or other descriptions by the narrator/author.

  • What the other characters say about him or her.

  • How the other characters act towards him or her.


Characterization1
Characterization

  • What the character says and doesn’t say.

  • What the character does and doesn’t do.

  • Physical appearance or other descriptions by the narrator/author.

  • What the other characters say about him or her.

  • How the other characters act towards him or her.

  • As a careful reader, which of the ideas on the left should you trust and which should you question?


Begin reading
Begin Reading

  • Tonight, you will read pages 3-16 and focus on the setting and characterization of Shadrack.

  • As we read right now, consider the perspective from which this is written = 1973.

  • What type of place is Bottom?


Homework
Homework

  • Review the notes from all three literary criticisms.

  • You promised!


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