Implementation of a Pharmacist-Managed IV to PO
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 1

Implementation of a Pharmacist-Managed IV to PO Medication Conversion Program PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 82 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Implementation of a Pharmacist-Managed IV to PO Medication Conversion Program. Allison Miller Pollock, Pharm. D., Heidemarie Windham, Pharm.D., Candy Tsourounis, Pharm. D. Supported by Caring Wisely, a project of the UCSF Center for Healthcare Value – Delivery Systems Initiative .

Download Presentation

Implementation of a Pharmacist-Managed IV to PO Medication Conversion Program

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Implementation of a pharmacist managed iv to po medication conversion program

Implementation of a Pharmacist-Managed IV to PO

Medication Conversion Program

Allison Miller Pollock, Pharm. D.,

Heidemarie Windham, Pharm.D., Candy Tsourounis, Pharm. D.

Supported by Caring Wisely, a project of the UCSF Center for Healthcare Value – Delivery Systems Initiative 

BACKGROUND

IV to PO Medication Conversion Protocol

CONCLUSIONS

  • The number of accepted conversions represented by month and location varied over the course of the 6 months

  • Adult and pediatric in-patients at UCSF Medical Center, UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital and UCSF Mt. Zion Hospital, with enteral access receiving one of the 16 approved IV medications

  • Training of pharmacists and notification of house staff occurred prior to the program go-live date, March 8, 2013

  • Patients with the following were excluded from participation:

    • Strict NPO

    • Active GI bleed

    • Documented SBO/ileus

    • Persistent N/V

    • Unconscious/unable to swallow with no enteral route available

    • Impaired GI absorption (short gut, recent GI surgery within 72 hours or without return of flatus, gut edema, GI fistulas)

    • Severe graft versus host disease (GVHD) or mucositis

    • Continuous tube feeds for medications whose absorption may be hindered with enteral nutrition interactions

  • Intravenous (IV) to oral (PO) therapeutic interchange programs have become common practice at institutions across the U.S.

  • IV medications are often continued for patients who are receiving other PO medications and have no obvious clinical reason for IV medication administration

  • The continuation of unnecessary IV medications results in increased direct and indirect costs to patients and the institution

  • At UCSF Medical Center, we spend over $80 million in yearly medication acquisition costs for all patients; approximately $50 million is spent yearly for inpatient use (blood products excluded)

  • Evidence suggests that properly managed IV to PO therapeutic interchange programs can reduce medication acquisition costs by X%

  • The cost savings for all 1328 accepted conversions across all three locations approaches $10,000 per day of IV therapy saved

GOALS

RESULTS

CONCLUSIONS

  • To develop and implement a pharmacist-managed IV to PO medication conversion program for patients hospitalized at Benioff Children’s Hospital and adult patients hospitalized at UCSF Medical Center and Mt. Zion Medical Center.

  • To decrease IV medication utilization in hospitalized patients by at least XX%

  • To estimate the cost savings of the IV to PO medication conversion program following implementation

Overview of accepted and rejected IV to PO conversions during the initial 6- month period (March 18th – September 18th, 2013)

  • A pharmacist managed IV to PO conversion program resulted in a significant reduction in the continuation of IV medications

  • A cost analysis is in progress to estimate direct and indirect cost savings

  • What can you do?

    • Review daily the need for IV medications especially when patients are receiving other oral medications

    • Transition patients from IV medications to PO when clinically appropriate

    • IV medications contribute to increased:

      • cost

      • length of stay

      • chance of infection and related complications

      • use of health care provider resources

  • In 2012, the Pharmacy & Therapeutics committee approved a list of 16 medications eligible for IV to PO conversion and the pharmacist-run protocol characterizing the IV to PO conversion process


  • Login