Response to intervention accelerating achievement for all students
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 106

Response to Intervention: Accelerating Achievement for ALL Students PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 208 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Response to Intervention: Accelerating Achievement for ALL Students. Illinois IEA Professional Development Workshop Dr. George M. Batsche Professor and Co-Director Institute for School Reform Florida Statewide Problem-Solving/RtI Project University of South Florida.

Download Presentation

Response to Intervention: Accelerating Achievement for ALL Students

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Response to intervention accelerating achievement for all students

Response to Intervention: Accelerating Achievement for ALL Students

Illinois IEA Professional Development Workshop

Dr. George M. Batsche

Professor and Co-Director

Institute for School Reform

Florida Statewide Problem-Solving/RtI Project

University of South Florida


National resources to support district and school implementation

National Resources to Support District and School Implementation

  • www.nasdse.org

    • Building and District Implementation Blueprints

    • Current research (evidence-based practices) that supports use of RtI

  • www.rtinetwork.org

    • Blueprints to support implementation

    • Monthly RtI Talks

    • Virtual visits to schools implementing RtI

    • Webinars

    • Progress Monitoring Tools to Assess Level of Implementation

  • www.justreadflorida.org/readingwalkthrough/

    • Principal Walk Through Integrity Evaluations

  • www.floridarti.usf.edu

    • Introductory Course


The vision

The Vision

  • 95% of students at “proficient” level

  • Students possess social and emotional behaviors that support “active” learning

  • A “unified” system of educational services

    • One “ED”

  • Student Support Services perceived as a necessary component for successful schooling


The outcomes

The Outcomes

  • Maximize effect of core instruction for all students

  • Targeted instruction and interventions for at-risk learners

  • Significant improvements in pro-social behaviors

  • Reduction in over-representation of diverse student groups in low academic performance, special education, suspension/expulsion, and alternative education.

  • Overall improvement in achievement rates

  • Maximize efficiency and return on investment

  • AYP


Response to intervention accelerating achievement for all students

The Model


Response to intervention

Response to Intervention

  • RtI is the practice of (1) providing high-quality instruction/intervention matched to student needs and (2) using learning rate over time and level of performance to (3) make important educational decisions.

    (Batsche, et al., 2005)

  • Problem-solving is the process that is used to develop effective instruction/interventions.


Problem solving process

Problem Solving Process

Define the Problem

Defining Problem/Directly Measuring Behavior

Problem Analysis

Validating Problem

Ident Variables that Contribute to Problem

Develop Plan

Evaluate

Response to Intervention (RtI)

Implement Plan

Implement As Intended

Progress Monitor

Modify as Necessary


Three tiered model of school supports the problem solving process

Three-Tiered Model of School Supports & the Problem-solving Process

ACADEMIC SYSTEMS

Tier 3: Comprehensive & IntensiveStudents who need individualized interventions.

Tier 2: Strategic InterventionsStudents who need more support in addition to the core curriculum.

Tier 1: Core CurriculumAll students, including students who require curricular enhancements for acceleration.

BEHAVIOR SYSTEMS

Tier 3: Intensive InterventionsStudents who need individualized intervention.

Tier 2: Targeted Group InterventionsStudents who need more support in addition to school-wide positive behavior program.

Tier 1: Universal Interventions All students in all settings.


Model of schooling

Model of Schooling

  • All district instruction and intervention services have a “place” in this model.

  • If it does not fit in the model, should it be funded?

  • All supplemental and intensive services must be integrated with core.


Problem solving rti resource management

Problem-Solving/RtIResource Management

1-5%

1-5%

5-10%

5-10%

Students

80-90%

80-90%

  • Public Education Resource Deployment

    • Support staff cannot resource more than 20% of the students

    • Service vs Effectiveness--BIG ISSUE

Academic

Behavior


Rti framing issues and key concepts

RtI: Framing Issues and Key Concepts

  • Academic Engaged Time (AET) is the best predictor of student achievement

    • 330 minutes in a day, 1650 in a week and 56,700 in a year

    • This is the “currency” of instruction/intervention

    • Its what we have to spend on students

    • How we use it determines student outcomes.

  • MOST students who are behind will respond positively to additional CORE instruction.

    • Schools have more staff qualified to deliver core instruction than specialized instruction.

    • Issue is how to schedule in such a way as to provide more exposure to core.


Rti framing issues and key concepts1

RtI: Framing Issues and Key Concepts

  • Managing the GAP between student current level of performance and expectation (benchmark, standards, goal) is what RtI is all about.

  • The two critical pieces of information we need about students are:

    • How BIG is the GAP?

      • AND

  • How much time do we have to close it?

  • The answers to these 2 questions defines our instructional mission.


  • Rti rate

    RtI: RATE

    • Rate is growth per week (month) necessary to close the GAP

    • Rate becomes the statistic we need to define evidence-based intervention (EBI)

    • EBI is any intervention that results in the desired RATE


    Rti 3 priorities

    RtI: 3 Priorities

    1. Prevention: Identify students at-risk for literacy failure BEFORE they actually fail.

    • Kindergarten screening, intervention and progress monitoring is key.

    • No excuse for not identifying ALL at-risk students by November of the kindergarten year.

    • This strategy prevents the GAP.

    • Managing GAPs is more expensive and less likely to be successful.


    Rti 3 priorities1

    RtI: 3 Priorities

    • Early Intervention

      • Purpose here is the manage the GAP.

      • Students who are more that 2 years behind have a 10% chance, or less, or catching up.

      • Benchmark, progress monitoring data, district-wide assessments are used to identify students that have a gap of 2 years or less.

      • Students bumping up against the 2 year level receive the most intensive services.

      • This more costly and requires more specialized instruction/personnel


    Rti 3 priorities2

    RtI: 3 Priorities

    • Intensive Intervention

      • Reserved for those students who have a GAP of more than 2 years and the rate of growth to close the GAP is unrealistic. Too much growth—too little time remaining.

      • Problem-solving is used to develop instructional priorities.

      • This is truly a case of “you cannot do something different the same way.”

      • This is the most costly, staff intensive and least likely to result in goal attainment


    How does it fit together standard treatment protocol

    How Does it Fit Together?Standard Treatment Protocol

    Results

    Monitoring

    Addl.

    Diagnostic

    Assessment

    Instruction

    All Students at

    a grade level

    Individualized

    Intensive

    Individual

    Diagnostic

    Intensive

    1-5%

    weekly

    Small

    Group

    Differen-

    tiated

    By Skill

    Supplemental

    5-10%

    Standard

    Protocol

    Behavior

    Academics

    2 times/month

    Core

    Bench-

    Mark

    Assessment

    Annual

    Testing

    ODRs

    Monthly

    Bx

    Screening

    None

    Continue

    With

    Core

    Instruction

    Grades

    Classroom

    Assessments

    Yearly Assessments

    80-90%

    Step 2

    Step 3

    Step 4

    Step 1


    Critical components

    Critical Components

    • Data are used to evaluate the effectiveness of core instruction

      • 80% of students receiving ONLY core instruction are proficient

    • Supplemental Instruction/Intervention uses a “standard protocol” of instruction based on student needs, informed by data

      • 70% of students receiving Supplemental AND Core are proficient


    Critical components1

    Critical Components

    • Intensive instruction developed for students who have not responded as desired to Core PLUS Supplemental Instruction


    What does the research say about rti

    What Does the Research Say About RtI?


    Effective schools

    Effective Schools

    • 30% or more of students at risk but who were at grade level at the end of the year.

    • Characteristics

      • Strong Leadership

      • Positive Belief and Teacher Dedication

      • Data Utilization and Analysis

      • Effective Scheduling

      • Professional Development

      • Scientifically-Based Intervention Programs

      • Parent Involvement

        • (Crawford and Torgeson)

        • (


    Data on the top 10 schools meeting the effective school criteria

    Data on the Top 10 Schools Meeting the Effective School Criteria


    What is the impact of psm rti on students from diverse backgrounds

    What is the impact of PSM/RtI on students from diverse backgrounds?

    • VanDerHeyden, et al. report that students responded positively to the method and that African-American students responded more quickly than other ethnic groups.

    • Marston reported a 50%decrease in EMH placements over a 6-year period of time.

    • Marston reported a drop over a 3-year period in the percent of African-American students placed in special education from 67% to 55%, considering 45% of the student population was comprised of African-American Students.

    • Batsche (2006) reported a significant decrease in the risk indices for ELL and African-American students


    Risk indices by year race ethnicity

    Risk Indices by Year & Race/Ethnicity


    Response to intervention1

    Response to Intervention

    Implementation


    How do we do rti

    How Do We “Do” RtI?

    • Organized by a District PLAN

    • Driven by Professional Development

    • Supported by Coaching and Technical Assistance

    • Informed by DATA


    Change model

    Change Model

    Consensus

    Infrastructure

    Implementation


    Stages of implementing problem solving rti

    Stages of Implementing Problem-Solving/RtI

    • Consensus

      • Belief is shared

      • Vision is agreed upon

      • Implementation requirements understood

    • Infrastructure Development

      • Problem-Solving Process

      • Data System

      • Policies/Procedures

      • Training

      • Tier I and II intervention systems

        • E.g., K-3 Academic Support Plan

      • Technology support

      • Decision-making criteria established

    • Implementation


    Building consensus

    Building Consensus

    • Knowledge

    • Beliefs

    • Understanding the “Need”- DATA

    • Skills and/or Support


    Consensus essential beliefs

    Consensus:Essential Beliefs

    • No child should be left behind

    • It is OK to provide differential service across students

    • Academic Engaged Time must be considered first

    • Student performance is influenced most by the quality of the interventions we deliver and how well we deliver them- not preconceived notions about child characteristics

    • Decisions are best made with data

    • Our expectations for student performance should be dependent on a student’s response to intervention, not on the basis of a “score” that “predicts” what they are “capable” of doing.


    Consensus development data

    Consensus Development:Data

    • Are you happy with your data?

    • Building/Grade Level Student Outcomes

      • Disaggregated

      • AYP


    Response to intervention accelerating achievement for all students

    Knowledge and Skill Requirements


    Personnel critical to successful implementation

    Personnel Critical to Successful Implementation

    • District-Level Leaders

    • Building Leaders

    • Facilitator

    • Teachers/Student Services

    • Parents

    • Students


    Response to intervention accelerating achievement for all students

    Development of the Infrastructure


    Key points

    Key Points

    • Unit of implementation is the building level.

    • Implementation process takes 4-6 years.

    • Implementation progress must be monitored

    • Must be guided by data indicating implementation level and integrity

    • Must be supported by professional development and technical assistance

    • Drive by a strategic plan

    • It is a journey, not a sprint


    Implementation model

    Implementation Model

    • District-based leadership team (DBLT)

    • School-based leadership team (SBLT)

    • School-based coach

      • Process Technical Assistance

      • Interpretation and Use of Data

    • Evaluation Data


    Response to intervention accelerating achievement for all students

    The Infrastructure


    Problem solving process1

    Problem Solving Process

    Define the Problem

    Defining Problem/Directly Measuring Behavior

    Problem Analysis

    Validating Problem

    Ident Variables that Contribute to Problem

    Develop Plan

    Evaluate

    Response to Intervention (RtI)

    Implement Plan

    Implement As Intended

    Progress Monitor

    Modify as Necessary


    Steps in the problem solving process

    Steps in the Problem-Solving Process

    • PROBLEM IDENTIFICATION

      • Identify replacement behavior

      • Data- current level of performance

      • Data- benchmark level(s)

      • Data- peer performance

      • Data- GAP analysis

    • PROBLEM ANALYSIS

      • Develop hypotheses( brainstorming)

      • Develop predictions/assessment

    • INTERVENTION DEVELOPMENT

      • Develop interventions in those areas for which data are available and hypotheses verified

      • Proximal/Distal

      • Implementation support

    • Response to Intervention (RtI)

      • Frequently collected data

      • Type of Response- good, questionable, poor


    Data for each tier where do they come from

    Data For Each Tier - Where Do They Come From?

    Tier 1: Universal Screening, accountability assessments, grades, classroom assessments, referral patterns, discipline referrals

    Tier 2: Universal Screening - Group Level Diagnostics (maybe), systematic progress monitoring, large-scale assessment data and classroom assessment

    Tier 3: Universal Screenings, Individual Diagnostics, intensive and systematic progress monitoring, formative assessment, other informal assessments


    Academic behaviors

    “Academic” Behaviors

    • Class work completed/accuracy

    • Home work completed/accuracy

    • Test scores/accuracy

    • Student Level of Performance

    • Goal or benchmark

    • Peer level of performance


    Example

    Example

    • Data taken during a single grading period (6 weeks)

    • Progress Monitor Homework completed and accuracy

      • Goal: Completed 75%, Accuracy 75%

      • Student: Completed 40%, Accuracy 50%

      • Peers: Completed 65%, Accuracy 78%

      • Time Frame: 6 weeks

      • Assignments/Week: 20


    Example1

    Example

    • Completion:

      • 75-40=30 % improvement in 6 weeks

      • 30%/6 weeks= Improvement rate of 5%/week

      • 5% of 20 assignments=1 per week

      • Rate of Improvement for an effective intervention is 1 ADDITIONAL ASSIGNMENT PER WEEK


    Decision rules what constitutes good rti

    Decision Rules:What Constitutes “Good” RtI?


    Decision rules

    Decision Rules

    • Response to Intervention Rules

    • Linking RtI to Intervention Decisions


    Decision rules what is a good response to intervention

    Decision Rules: What is a “Good” Response to Intervention?

    Positive Response

    Gap is closing

    Can extrapolate point at which target student(s) will “come in range” of target--even if this is long range

    Level of “risk” lowers over time

    Questionable Response

    Rate at which gap is widening slows considerably, but gap is still widening

    Gap stops widening but closure does not occur

    Poor Response

    Gap continues to widen with no change in rate.


    Response to intervention accelerating achievement for all students

    Positive Response to Intervention

    Expected Trajectory

    Performance

    Observed Trajectory

    Time


    Decision rules what is a questionable response to intervention

    Decision Rules: What is a “Questionable” Response to Intervention?

    Positive Response

    Gap is closing

    Can extrapolate point at which target student(s) will “come in range” of target--even if this is long range

    Questionable Response

    Rate at which gap is widening slows considerably, but gap is still widening

    Gap stops widening but closure does not occur

    Level of “risk” remains the same over time

    Poor Response

    Gap continues to widen with no change in rate.


    Response to intervention accelerating achievement for all students

    Questionable Response to Intervention

    Expected Trajectory

    Performance

    Observed Trajectory

    Time


    Decision rules what is a poor response to intervention

    Decision Rules: What is a “Poor” Response to Intervention?

    Positive Response

    Gap is closing

    Can extrapolate point at which target student(s) will “come in range” of target--even if this is long range

    Questionable Response

    Rate at which gap is widening slows considerably, but gap is still widening

    Gap stops widening but closure does not occur

    Poor Response

    Gap continues to widen with no change in rate.

    Level of “risk” worsens over time


    Response to intervention accelerating achievement for all students

    Poor Response to Intervention

    Expected Trajectory

    Performance

    Observed Trajectory

    Time


    Response to intervention accelerating achievement for all students

    Positive

    Questionable

    Poor

    Response to Intervention

    Expected Trajectory

    Performance

    Observed Trajectory

    Time


    Decision rules linking rti to intervention decisions

    Decision Rules: Linking RtI to Intervention Decisions

    Positive

    Continue intervention with current goal

    Continue intervention with goal increased

    Fade intervention to determine if student(s) have acquired functional independence.


    Decision rules linking rti to intervention decisions1

    Decision Rules: Linking RtI to Intervention Decisions

    Questionable

    Was intervention implemented as intended?

    If no - employ strategies to increase implementation integrity

    If yes -

    Increase intensity of current intervention for a short period of time and assess impact. If rate improves, continue. If rate does not improve, return to problem solving.


    Decision rules linking rti to intervention decisions2

    Decision Rules: Linking RtI to Intervention Decisions

    Poor

    Was intervention implemented as intended?

    If no - employ strategies in increase implementation integrity

    If yes -

    Is intervention aligned with the verified hypothesis? (Intervention Design)

    Are there other hypotheses to consider? (Problem Analysis)

    Was the problem identified correctly? (Problem Identification)


    Building the foundation

    BUILDING THE FOUNDATION


    Response to intervention accelerating achievement for all students

    Tier I Problem-Solving:

    Data and Skills Needed

    Tier I - Assessment

    Discipline Data (ODR)

    Benchmark Assessment

    School Climate Surveys

    Universal Screening

    FCAT

    Universal Screening

    District-Wide Assessments

    Tier I - Core Interventions

    School-wide Discipline Positive Behavior Supports

    Whole-class Interventions

    Core Instruction

    10 - 15%

    80 - 90%


    Response to intervention accelerating achievement for all students

    H


    Tier 1 data example

    Tier 1 Data Example


    Referral analysis

    Referral Analysis

    • 42% Noncompliance

    • 30% Off-Task/Inattention

    • 12% Physical/Verbal Aggression

    • 6% Relational Aggression

    • 10% Bullying


    Building level behavior data

    Building-Level Behavior Data

    • % Building %Referred

      Male 50%80%

      White 72%54%

      Hispanic 12%20%

      African American 15%24%

      Other 1% 2%

      Low SES 25%50%


    What does core instruction look like for reading

    What does core instruction look like for reading?

    K-5

    • 90 minute reading block

      • Comprehensive readingprogram is the central tool for instruction.

      • Explicit, systematic, and differentiated instruction is provided.

      • In-class grouping strategies are in use, including small group instruction as appropriate to meet student needs.

      • Active student engagement occurs in a variety of reading-based activities, which connect to the essential components of reading and academic goals.

      • Effective classroom management and high levels of time on task are evident.

        6-12

    • Content area courses in which the reading content standards are addressed for all students including:

      • Middle School Developmental Reading

      • English/Language Arts

      • Other core areas such as science, social studies, and math


    What strategies exist to differentiate instruction for k 5 students in tier 1

    What strategies exist to differentiate instruction for K-5 students in Tier 1?

    • Differentiate in small, flexible reading groups

      • Use data to form groups based on skills to be taught (comprehension, phonics, etc.)

      • Ensure that groups are flexible

      • Determine a schedule to rotate children through groups/centers

      • Ensure that students with the most intensive needs meet in the teacher-led center everyday

    • Targeted and deliberate independent reading practice that utilizes relevant practice, extension, and production opportunities


    What strategies exist to differentiate instruction for 6 12 students in tier 1

    What strategies exist to differentiate instruction for 6-12 students in Tier 1?

    • CAR-PD

    • Differentiate in small groups

      • Use data to from groups based on skills to be taught

      • Groups need to be flexible

      • Determine a schedule to rotate students through groups

    • Support from the reading coach

    • Take responsibility for student learning


    What data can be collected to evaluate the impact of core instruction

    What data can be collected to evaluate the impact of core instruction?

    • Progress monitoringassessments three times a year (Benchmarking)

    • Ongoing Progress Monitoring (OPM)

    • Core Reading Program Unit Tests / Curriculum-based assessments

    • Outcome measures (SAT-10 and State Tests) to make decisions about student placement for the following year


    What strategies are available to evaluate the fidelity of core instruction

    What strategies are available to evaluate the fidelity of core instruction?

    • Principal Reading Walk Through

      • “If it gets inspected, it gets respected”

    • Effective instruction checklist

    • Elementary core reading program checklists


    Effective instruction foorman et al 2003 foorman torgesen 2001 arrasmith 2003 rosenshine 1986

    Effective Instruction(Foorman et al., 2003; Foorman & Torgesen, 2001; Arrasmith, 2003; & Rosenshine, 1986)


    Response to intervention accelerating achievement for all students

    Tier II Problem-Solving

    Data and Skills Needed

    1 - 5%

    Tier II - Assessment

    Behavioral Observations

    Intervention Data

    Group Diagnostic

    Universal Screening

    Progress Monitoring

    Tier II - Targeted Interventions

    Targeted Group Interventions

    Increased Intensity

    Narrow Focus

    Linked to Tier I

    10-15%

    80 - 90%

    Tier I Assessment

    Tier I - Core Interventions

    10 - 15%

    80 - 90%


    Data infrastructure using existing data to predict intervention needs for tier 2

    Data Infrastructure: Using Existing Data to Predict Intervention Needs for Tier 2

    • Previous referral history predicts future referral history

    • Benchmark and Progress Monitoring Data

    • Common Assessments in Middle and High School

    • Middle and High School

      • Student data history prior to entering


    Data driven infrastructure establishing a building baseline

    Data-Driven Infrastructure:Establishing a Building Baseline

    • Code referrals (reasons) for past 2-3 years

      • Identifies problems teachers feel they do not have the skills/support to handle

      • Referral pattern reflects skill pattern of the staff, the resources currently in place and the “history” of what constitutes a referral in that building

      • Identifies likely referral types for next 2 years

      • Identifies focus of Professional Development Activities AND potential Tier II and III interventions

      • Present data to staff. Reinforces “Need” concept


    Tier functions integration

    Tier Functions/Integration

    • How the Tiers work

    • Time aggregation

    • Tier integration


    How the tiers work

    How the Tiers Work

    • Goal: Student is successful with Tier 1 level of support-academic or behavioral

    • Greater the tier, greater support and “severity”

    • Increase level of support (Tier level) until you identify an intervention that results in a positive response to intervention

    • Continue until student strengthens response significantly

    • Systematically reduce support (Lower Tier Level)

    • Determine the relationship between sustained growth and sustained support.


    Integrating the tiers

    Integrating the Tiers

    • 5th grade student reading at the 2nd grade level

      • Tier 3

        • Direct Instruction, Targeted, Narrow Focus (e.g., phonemic awareness, phonics, some fluency)

      • Tier 2

        • Fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, pre-teach for Tier 1

      • Tier 1

        • Focus on comprehension, participation, scripted decoding

    • Use core materials for content

    • Progress monitor both instructional level and grade placement level skills


    What do we know about the characteristics of effective interventions

    What do we know about the characteristics of effective interventions?

    • They always increase the intensity of instruction - they accelerate learning

    • They always provide many more opportunities for re-teaching, review, and practice

    • They are focused carefully on the most essential learning needs of the students.


    Characteristics of tier 2 interventions

    Characteristics of Tier 2 Interventions

    • Available in general education settings

    • Opportunity to increase exposure (academic engaged time) to curriculum

    • Opportunity to narrow focus of the curriculum

    • Sufficient time for interventions to have an effect (10-30 weeks)

    • Often are “standardized” supplemental curriculum protocols


    Interventions tier 2

    Interventions: Tier 2

    • First resource is TIME (AET)

      • HOW much more time is needed?

    • Second resource is curriculum

      • WHAT does the student need?

    • Third resource is personnel

      • WHO or WHERE will it be provided?


    Tier 2 getting time

    Tier 2: Getting TIME

    • “Free” time--does not require additional personnel

      • Staggering instruction

      • Differentiating instruction

      • Cross grade instruction

      • Skill-based instruction

    • Standard Protocol Grouping

    • Reduced range of “standard” curriculum

    • After-School

    • Home-Based


    Tier 2 curriculum

    Tier 2: Curriculum

    • Standard protocol approach

    • Focus on essential skills

    • Most likely, more EXPOSURE and more FOCUS of core instruction

    • Linked directly to core instruction materials and benchmarks

    • Criterion for effectiveness is 70% of students receiving Tier 2 will reach benchmarks


    Tier 2 personnel

    Tier 2: Personnel

    • EVERYONE in the building is a potential resource

    • Re-conceptualize who does what

    • Personnel deployed AFTER needs are identified

    • WHERE matters less and less

    • REMEMBER, student performance matters more than labels, locations and staff needs.

    • A school cannot deliver intensive services to more than 7% of the population


    3 fs 1 s data pd effective powerful instruction

    3 Fs + 1 S + Data + PD = Effective & Powerful Instruction

    • Frequency and duration of meeting in small groups – every day, etc.

    • Focus of instruction (the What) – work in vocabulary, phonics, comprehension, etc.

    • Format of lesson (the How) – determining the lesson structure and the level of scaffolding, modeling, explicitness, etc.

    • Size of instructional group – 3, 6, or 8 students, etc.

    • Use data to help determine the 3 Fs and 1 S (the Why)

    • Provide professional development in the use of data and in the 3 Fs and 1 S


    What does supplemental instruction intervention look like for reading

    What does supplemental instruction/intervention look like for reading?

    • Logistics of supplemental instruction/ intervention

      • Specific time and place included in schedule

      • Who will provide it? (classroom teacher or outside support – Reading specialist, ESE, SLP, etc.)

      • Materials/how will the provider access them?

      • Common planning time established between the classroom teacher and intervention teacher, if applicable

      • Establish guidelines for when to evaluate the effectiveness of instruction and guidelines to determine what is a “good” response


    Intervention support

    Intervention Support

    • Intervention plans should be developed based on student need and skills of staff

    • All intervention plans should have intervention support

    • Principals should ensure that intervention plans have intervention support

    • Teachers should not be expected to implement plans for which there is no support


    Critical components of intervention support

    Critical Components of Intervention Support

    • Support for Intervention Integrity

    • Documentation of Intervention Implementation

    • Intervention and Eligibility decisions and outcomes cannot be supported in an RtI model without these two critical components


    Intervention support1

    Intervention Support

    • Pre-meeting

      • Review data

      • Review steps to intervention

      • Determine logistics

    • First 2 weeks

      • 2-3 meetings/week

      • Review data

      • Review steps to intervention

      • Revise, if necessary


    Intervention support2

    Intervention Support

    • Second Two Weeks

      • Meet twice each week

    • Following weeks

      • Meet at least weekly

      • Review data

      • Review steps

      • Discuss Revisions

    • Approaching benchmark

      • Review data

      • Schedule for intervention fading

      • Review data


    Tier 3 decisions

    Tier 3 Decisions

    • GAP?

    • Rate??

    • Independent Functioning?

      • Fade Intervention to Supplemental Level

      • Evaluate Rate


    Tier 3

    Tier 3

    • Individual and Very Small Group

    • Individual Diagnostic Procedures

    • Intensive Interventions

    • Goal is to determine interventions that close the GAP

    • Pre-requisite for consideration for any special education program


    Response to intervention accelerating achievement for all students

    resources

    skill

    Ways that instruction must be made more powerful for students “at-risk” for reading difficulties.

    More powerful instruction involves:

    More instructional time

    Smaller instructional groups

    More precisely targeted at right level

    Clearer and more detailed explanations

    More systematic instructional sequences

    More extensive opportunities for guided practice

    More opportunities for error correction and feedback


    What are the logistics of tier 3 instruction

    What are the logistics of Tier 3 instruction?

    • Specific place and time set aside on the schedule (daily)

    • Who will provide it? (classroom teacher or outside support – Reading specialist, ESE, SLP, etc.)

    • Materials/how will the provider access them?

    • Common planning time established between the two providers, if applicable

    • Establishing guidelines for when to evaluate the effectiveness of instruction and guidelines to determine what is a “good” response


    Ongoing progress monitoring opm

    Ongoing Progress Monitoring (OPM)

    K-2

    • all of the same TDI tasks

    • ORF in grades 1 and 2

      3-12

    • ORF at grades 3-5

    • MAZE at grades K-12

    • Informal toolkit with:

      • Instructional Level reading comprehension passages & passage-specific Question & Response templates

      • Multiple Lexiled passages for oral reading fluency, accuracy, and comprehension

      • Phonics Inventory

      • Sight Word Inventory

      • Instructional Implications of Word Analysis Task


    Response to intervention accelerating achievement for all students

    How do we ensure that Tier 3 instruction is integrated with/includes core instructional content when appropriate and transfers to student success in core?

    • Instructors need to communicate, if applicable

    • Both instructors must have access to the core materials, if applicable

    • Understanding the core content in order to provide access to the information but at an appropriate reading level


    Data based determination of expectations elsie

    Data-Based Determination of Expectations: Elsie

    • Benchmark Level:100 WCPM

    • Current Level:47 WCPM

    • Difference to June Benchmark (Gap):53 WCPM

    • Time to Benchmark: 41 Weeks

    • Rate of Growth Required:

      • 53/41= 1.29 WCPM for Elsie

    • Peer Group Rate = about 1.1 WCPM growth (at benchmark) 1.2 WCMP (for “some risk” benchmark)

    • REALISTIC? Not unless you increase AET


    Response to intervention accelerating achievement for all students

    Questionable RtI


    Tier 2 supplemental instruction revision

    Tier 2- Supplemental Instruction - Revision

    • The intervention appeared to be working. What the teachers thought was needed was increased time in supplemental instruction.

    • They worked together and found a way to give Elsie 30 minutes of supplemental instruction, on phonics and fluency, 5x per week.


    Data based determination of expectations elsie1

    Data-Based Determination of Expectations: Elsie

    • Benchmark Level:100 WCPM

    • Current Level:56 WCPM

    • Difference to June Benchmark (Gap):44 WCPM

    • Time to Benchmark: 27 Weeks

    • Rate of Growth Required:

      • 44/27= 1.62 WCPM for Elsie

    • Peer Group Rate = 1.1 WCPM growth (at benchmark) 1.2 WCMP (for “some risk” benchmark)

    • REALISTIC? Not unless you increase AET


    Response to intervention accelerating achievement for all students

    Good RtI


    Response to intervention accelerating achievement for all students

    Aimline= 2 percent/week

    Trendline = 3 percent/week


    Response to intervention accelerating achievement for all students

    Aimline= 1.50 words/week

    Trendline = 0.95 words/week


    Response to intervention accelerating achievement for all students

    Behavioral

    Case

    Examples


    Response to intervention accelerating achievement for all students

    II


  • Login