Internationalizing r404 international textiles and apparel trade
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 21

Internationalizing R404: International Textiles and Apparel Trade PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 46 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Internationalizing R404: International Textiles and Apparel Trade. Interview of Mary Embry by Sara Reeves. OVERVIEW. Motivations Steps Assignments Evaluations. INTERNATIONALIZATION COLLABORATIVE ACROSS BLOOMINGTON (ICAB).

Download Presentation

Internationalizing R404: International Textiles and Apparel Trade

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Internationalizing r404 international textiles and apparel trade

Internationalizing R404: International Textiles and Apparel Trade

Interview of Mary Embry by Sara Reeves


Overview

OVERVIEW

  • Motivations

  • Steps

  • Assignments

  • Evaluations


Internationalization collaborative across bloomington icab

INTERNATIONALIZATION COLLABORATIVE ACROSS BLOOMINGTON (ICAB)

  • Four-year collaboration between Indiana University Bloomington and Ivy Tech Bloomington

  • Develops faculty learning communities working towards designing global learning experiences

  • Professional support on course and curriculum internationalization


Motivations

MOTIVATIONS

  • To improve student’s ability to adopt non-western viewpoints

  • To more actively involve students in international socio-economic issues

  • To explore global citizenship practices


First steps

FIRST STEPS

  • Evaluate course outcomes

  • Backward course design

  • Trade from at least two perspectives


Original outcomes

ORIGINAL OUTCOMES

1. Develop critical thinking and communication skills.

  • Evaluate breadth and depth of information. Read, listen, discuss, observe

  • Evaluate quality of information: primary and secondary sources; fact, theory, findings, description, opinion, hearsay.

  • Analyze consistency and conflict of information: determine major points.

  • Synthesize response.

    2. Analyze the size, scope, and components of the global textile and apparel business.

    3. Understand the concept of the global economy and basic trade regulations in effect.

    4. Consider conflicts and compare merits of perspectives of textile and apparel business operations.


Internationalized outcomes

INTERNATIONALIZED OUTCOMES

1. Understand the global textile and apparel supply chain; compare and contrast where apparel and textile product is made, where it is consumed, and why.

2. Demonstrate the ability to use databases, library resources, and international sources to access rich information that is specifically used to understand the global textile and apparel industry.

3. Be able to use both quantitative and qualitative descriptors that characterize a country socially, economically, and politically. Use these descriptors to make comparisons of standards of living between countries.

4. Identify and compare national, regional, and international structures that are involved in global trade in textiles and apparel.

5. Define and argue the competing views of impact that textiles and apparel manufacturing and consumption has socially and economically.


Pedagogical structures

PEDAGOGICAL STRUCTURES

  • a clear focus on information literacyso students can effectively search, find and employ global sources

  • conducting interviews with international students from the area of the world the student is studying

  • reflective writing that contrasts and compares global perspectives

  • relevant examples of people who exhibit global citizenship


Information literacy relevant course outcomes

INFORMATION LITERACY RELEVANT COURSE OUTCOMES

Understand the global textile and apparel supply chain; compare and contrast where apparel and textile product is made, where it is consumed, and why.

Demonstrate the ability to use databases, library resources, and international sources to access rich information that is specifically used to understand the global textile and apparel industry.

Be able to use both quantitative and qualitative descriptors that characterize a country socially, economically, and politically. Use these descriptors to make comparisons of standards of living between countries.

Identify and compare national, regional, and international structures that are involved in global trade in textiles and apparel.

Define and argue the competing views of impact that textiles and apparel manufacturing and consumption has socially and economically.


Information literacy integration

INFORMATION LITERACYINTEGRATION


Information literacy pre post tests spring 2012 and fall 2012

INFORMATION LITERACYPRE/POST TESTS SPRING 2012 AND FALL 2012


Contextual interviews

CONTEXTUAL INTERVIEWS

  • assignment: interview someone who has lived in your country of study. Clarify and further describe the economic, political, and cultural information you have acquired.

  • Where students find interviewees:

    • international Area Study Centers

    • cultural student organizations,

    • colleagues

    • friends and relatives

    • social media

  • Interviews are then used to discuss in class the differences between aggregate descriptors of a country and the concerns of those who have lived in the country. Often students base their final research topic on issues uncovered in these interviews.


Contextual interviews pre post evaluations

CONTEXTUAL INTERVIEWSPRE/POST EVALUATIONS


Worldview reflections relevant course outcomes

WORLDVIEW REFLECTIONSRELEVANT COURSE OUTCOMES

Understand the global textile and apparel supply chain; compare and contrast where apparel and textile product is made, where it is consumed, and why.

Demonstrate the ability to use databases, library resources, and international sources to access rich information that is specifically used to understand the global textile and apparel industry.

Be able to use both quantitative and qualitative descriptors that characterize a country socially, economically, and politically. Use these descriptors to make comparisons of standards of living between countries.

Identify and compare national, regional, and international structures that are involved in global trade in textiles and apparel.

Define and argue the competing views of impact that textiles and apparel manufacturing and consumption has socially and economically.


Worldview reflections example prompt

WORLDVIEW REFLECTIONSEXAMPLE PROMPT

OBJECTIVE: demonstration of an understanding of topics based on an assigned role in a developed country, then in a less industrialized country

example prompt: You are a citizen concerned about your country's standard of living and your well-being.

What are your views on:

being protective of the industry vs. adopting an export orientation?

encouraging multinationals vs. domestically owned industries?

do these views change if you are a consumer, manufacturer, or retailer?


Worldview reflections student examples

WORLDVIEW REFLECTIONSSTUDENT EXAMPLES

examples of internationalized reflections:

…we have the ability to produce low cost goods. It is important that trade barriers aren’t made for the purpose of restricting our capacity to export to other countries.

…when it comes to the Congo, what (does) free trade actually mean? What is really free about it?...

…I have just enough money to put food on the table…I am dependent on this job…and (the country) has not established any independent part of the supply chain….I am afraid our economy will suffer when others gain.


Worldview reflections pre post evaluations

WORLDVIEW REFLECTIONSPRE/POST EVALUATIONS


Thesis development

THESIS DEVELOPMENT

  • Students present interviews

  • Re-evaluate resources

  • Propose thesis for critique/thesis outline


Thesis development1

THESIS DEVELOPMENT

  • Student examples

    • Honduras is competitively positioned for industrial growth, the rippling effects of the political crisis of 2009 continue to further limit the nation’s opportunities for economic and social development.

    • An abundance of the natural resource, oil, has drastically impaired the country of Nigeria. The country struggles to deal with the wealth, the corruption, and mismanagement of that valuable resource, and the effects are felt economically, socially, environmentally, and politically. 

    • Guatemala’s participation in a global economy, which promised to be an engine of development and a lift out of poverty, has left many questioning the likely effects it has on improving the lives of individuals in Guatemala. A new transnational perspective has locked the country in an exploitive relationship with its trading partners, characterized by deplorable working conditions and persistent social inequality.


Global citizenship

GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP


Resources

RESOURCES

  • Internationalization Collaborative Across Bloomington (ICAB): www.indiana.edu/~global/icab

  • Prof. Embry’s ICAB Course Portfolio: go.iu.edu/7wg

  • ICAB Resources: www.indiana.edu/~global/icab/resources.php

  • Other Course Portfolios: www.indiana.edu/~global/icab/portfolios.php


  • Login