Improving ed bedside teaching resident evaluation l.jpg
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 18

Improving ED Bedside Teaching & Resident Evaluation PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 217 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Improving ED Bedside Teaching & Resident Evaluation. Stanford EM Faculty Development May 21 st , 2003. Objectives. Review recent literature regarding ‘Bedside Teaching’ and ‘Resident Evaluation’ Discuss the ACGME Outcomes Project and related performance assessment tools

Download Presentation

Improving ED Bedside Teaching & Resident Evaluation

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Improving ed bedside teaching resident evaluation l.jpg

Improving ED Bedside Teaching& Resident Evaluation

Stanford EM Faculty Development

May 21st, 2003


Objectives l.jpg

Objectives

  • Review recent literature regarding ‘Bedside Teaching’ and ‘Resident Evaluation’

  • Discuss the ACGME Outcomes Project and related performance assessment tools

  • Provide a forum for faculty discussion of issues related to resident education, with a goal of improving teaching skills

Michael Gisondi, MD - Stanford Emergency Medicine


Scope of the problem l.jpg

Scope of the Problem

  • EM Residents (in general) report low rates of bedside teaching and skills evaluation

    • Burdick WP and Schoffstall J. “Observation of emergency medicine residents at the bedside: how often does it happen?” 1995. Acad Emerg Med. 10(2): 909-13.

  • Our EM residents and 4th-year medical students continue to report a perceived inadequacy of bedside teaching (amount or quality?)

Michael Gisondi, MD - Stanford Emergency Medicine


What is bedside teaching l.jpg

What is Bedside Teaching?

  • Occurs at the bedside

  • Encompasses a variety of medical skills

    • History-taking

    • Physical Examination

    • Procedures

  • Demonstrative or observational

  • Includes real-time feedback or reflection

Michael Gisondi, MD - Stanford Emergency Medicine


Why bother l.jpg

Why bother?

  • Bedside teaching allows the faculty member to role-model behaviors that have been shown to improve the learners’:

    • Clinical skills

    • Ethical problem-solving

    • Humanism & Professionalism

    • Communication Skills

    • Standardized examination scores (USMLE)

Michael Gisondi, MD - Stanford Emergency Medicine


Why don t we do it l.jpg

Why don’t we do it?

  • Most significant barriers to bedside teaching:

    • Declining bedside teaching skills, especially for junior faculty members

    • The “aura of bedside teaching”: are the necessary skills essentially unobtainable?

    • Belief that such teaching is not valued

    • Erosion of the teaching ethic

      Ramani S et al. “Whither bedside teaching? A focus-group study of clinical teachers.” 2003. Acad Med. 78(4): 384-390.

Michael Gisondi, MD - Stanford Emergency Medicine


True or false em faculty don t have the time for bedside teaching l.jpg

True or False?“EM Faculty don’t have the time for bedside teaching.”

  • Berger T et al. “Does the demand for clinical productivity compromise teaching in academic emergency departments? Acad Emerg Med. 2003. 10(5): 473-5.

  • Residents and students were surveyed regarding the quality of teaching they received by the ED attending. Survey results were compared to EM specific RVUs. No statistical relationship between clinical productivity and effective teaching.

Michael Gisondi, MD - Stanford Emergency Medicine


How does one improve their bedside teaching skills l.jpg

How does one improve their bedside teaching skills?

  • What determines quality bedside teaching?

  • Requires preparation for focused encounter

  • The patient should agree to participate

  • Learners should be oriented to the encounter

  • Requires debriefing and feedback

Michael Gisondi, MD - Stanford Emergency Medicine


Some good articles to review l.jpg

Some good articles to review:

  • Ramani S. “Twelve tips to improve bedside teaching.” 2003. Med Teach. 25(2): 112-115. (provided)

    • Reprint purchased and copy placed in 701 conference room library

    • Attached to handout

  • Janicik RW, Fletcher KE. “Teaching at the bedside: a new model.” Med Teach. 2003. 25(2): 127-130.

    • Discusses faculty development skills workshop for junior faculty

  • Shayne P et al. “Protected clinical teaching time and a bedside clinical evaulation instrument in an emergency medicine training program.” Acad Emerg Med. 2002. 9(11): 1342-1349.

    • Discusses “teaching attending” position at Emory Univ.

Michael Gisondi, MD - Stanford Emergency Medicine


Some good articles to review10 l.jpg

Some good articles to review:

  • Cydulka RK et al. “Evaluation of resident performance and intensive bedside teaching during direct observation.” Acad Emerg Med. 1996. 3(4): 345-51.

    • CWRU’s program improved faculty job satisfaction!

  • Thomas H. “Teaching procedural skills: beyond ‘see one – do one’.” Acad Emerg Med. 1994. 1(4): 398-401.

    • Attached to handout

  • Hedges JR. “Pearls for the teaching of procedural skills at the bedside.” Acad Emerg Med. 1994. 1(4): 401-404.

    • Attached to handout

Michael Gisondi, MD - Stanford Emergency Medicine


What makes for quality em specific bedside teaching l.jpg

What makes for qualityEM-specific bedside teaching?

  • Encounters planned around common entities

  • Brief, direct learning objectives for each case

  • Allow time for direct observation

  • Provide immediate ‘areas for improvement’ and find a time to observe the resident again

  • A point for discussion and potential research!

Michael Gisondi, MD - Stanford Emergency Medicine


Outcome measures l.jpg

Outcome Measures

  • Medical educators historically study the wrong endpoints, focusing more on process (learner satisfaction) than product (quality patient care, clinical outcome measures)

  • How do you choose an outcome measure when evaluating resident education?

Michael Gisondi, MD - Stanford Emergency Medicine


The acgme outcome project l.jpg

The ACGME Outcome Project

  • Focuses on accomplishments, not potentials

  • 2 Phases

    • Phase 1: Implement 6 “General Competencies”

    • Phase 2: RRC to mandate adequate assessment of resident competencies by individual programs

  • Go to: http://www.acgme.org/outcome/project/OutIntro_fnl1.htm

    to view a slideshow on the history and goals of the ACGME Outcome Project

Michael Gisondi, MD - Stanford Emergency Medicine


The 6 general competencies l.jpg

The 6 “General Competencies”

  • Patient Care

  • Medical Knowledge

  • Practice-based learning and improvement

  • Interpersonal communication skills

  • Professionalism

  • Systems-based practice

    • Full text descriptions of each competency at: http://www.acgme.org/outcome/comp/compFull.asp

Michael Gisondi, MD - Stanford Emergency Medicine


Assessment evaluations l.jpg

Assessment = Evaluations

  • What is the best method of evaluating each competency?

  • One universal assessment tool for all six?

  • Universal assessment tool for each specialty?

  • ACGME provides a number of examples of educational assessment tools at: http://www.acgme.org/Outcome/assess/Toolbox.pdf

Michael Gisondi, MD - Stanford Emergency Medicine


Making the competencies em specific l.jpg

Making the Competencies EM-specific

  • Competency assessment tools are a popular topic in EM education literature

  • The Nov 2002 issue of Acad Emerg Med provides a number of articles regarding novel methods for resident assessment

  • Article with good EM perspective:

    • Strauss RW. “The quiet revolution in postgraduate training.” Acad Emerg Med. 2002. 9(11): 1222-25.

Michael Gisondi, MD - Stanford Emergency Medicine


Other stanford resources l.jpg

Other Stanford Resources

  • Stanford Faculty Development Center

    • Courses on bedside teaching (internist driven)

    • http://www.stanford.edu/group/SFDP/

  • ACEP Teaching Fellowship

    • Wait list is well over a year long! Call now!

    • http://www.acep.org/1,32536,0.html

Michael Gisondi, MD - Stanford Emergency Medicine


Points for tonight s discussion l.jpg

Points for Tonight’s Discussion?

  • Brainstorm ideas for improving the teaching skills of our faculty

    • Are we really failing the residents?

    • How do we improve? Faculty Teaching Retreat?

  • Discuss our current evaluation process

    • Are we really addressing the details of the ACGME Competencies?

    • If not, how do we improve the process?

Michael Gisondi, MD - Stanford Emergency Medicine


  • Login