East is east distribution
Download
1 / 72

East is East - Distribution Distribution is the middle part ... - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 427 Views
  • Uploaded on

East is East - Distribution Distribution is the middle part of the 'cinematic apparatus' which consists of production, distribution and exhibition. Any company that is involved in all three areas, such as Warner Bros., is described as being vertically integrated . East is East - Distribution

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'East is East - Distribution Distribution is the middle part ...' - omer


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
East is east distribution l.jpg
East is East - Distribution

  • Distribution is the middle part of the 'cinematic apparatus' which consists of production, distribution and exhibition. Any company that is involved in all three areas, such as Warner Bros., is described as being vertically integrated.


East is east distribution2 l.jpg
East is East - Distribution

  • In the case of East is East, the film was produced by Assassin Films with the majority of the finance coming from FilmFour whose distribution arm was responsible for getting the film into the cinemas. Distributors deal with 'p + a' (prints and advertising): they manage the distribution of prints to cinemas and create the marketing campaign.


East is east distribution3 l.jpg
East is East - Distribution

  • For most commercial films the first three days are the most important to its box office success. Hence the promotion of films usually focuses of the opening with the hope that positive word of mouth will give the film legs afterwards. Commercial films usually open widely, in Britain this would be in over 400 screens, to take advantage of the opening week's hype.


East is east distribution4 l.jpg
East is East - Distribution

  • East is East, however, because of its apparent lack of commercial potential, received a platform release. East is East opened, after previews, on Friday 5 November 1999 on 79 screens. The film 'went wide' in week three on 246 screens. The first five weeks of East is East's box office record is as follows:



East is east distribution6 l.jpg
East is East - Distribution

  • The staggered opening allows time for the realisation that an apparently non-commercial film is actually worth seeing. The distributors, confident of good reviews and word of mouth, can keep some of their promotional budget back to boost the roll-out over weeks two and three. The fact that the second week's box office take was about the same as the first, from virtually the same number of screens, indicated the film was going to be successful. Films normally drop about 30% in their second weekend.


East is east distribution7 l.jpg
East is East - Distribution

  • FilmFour probably waited two weeks, rather than one, before going wide to avoid going 'head to head' with The Sixth Sense, which had been a massive hit in North America. Distributors are always conscious of the competition.


East is east marketing l.jpg
East is East - Marketing

  • Philip Kotler defines marketing as a:

    human activity directed at satisfying needs and wants through exchange processes. (Kotler, 1980, p. 13)


East is east marketing9 l.jpg
East is East - Marketing

  • This basically means the selling of products and services. Marketing consists of four variables, called the marketing mix, and these are often characterised as the 'Four Ps':

    • price (of little relevance in film)

    • place

    • product

    • promotion.


East is east marketing10 l.jpg
East is East - Marketing

  • For our purposes we are interested in 'place', the distribution of East is East; the product and the promotion.


East is east marketing11 l.jpg
East is East - Marketing

  • Films are marketed like any other product or service. However, because they are all unique, each film must have its own campaign. A brand of beans, for example, only needs one campaign, in a given period, for every tin. This is obviously expensive, the average cost of marketing ('p + a' - prints and advertising) a Hollywood film, produced by a major studio, is about $25million (approximately half the cost of the film).


East is east marketing12 l.jpg
East is East - Marketing

  • The British film industry, primarily due to its relatively small domestic market, does not spend anywhere near Hollywood's amount of money. East is East cost £2.4 million to make and a relatively large £1 million was spent on marketing it.


East is east promotion l.jpg
East is East - Promotion

  • Promotion involves both advertising and publicity. Advertising consists of paid for space (in a magazine for instance) or time (on television and radio); publicity covers all the other promotional activities. For example, an advertisement in a magazine Time Out will cost £4095 for a full page and £2573 for a half page, while a review in the same publication will not cost anything. The review, of course, may be negative and therefore be useless as publicity.


East is east promotion14 l.jpg
East is East - Promotion

  • Publicity also includes interviews and profiles on a film's stars and, sometimes, the director. This would also be 'free of charge' to the film's distributors (who are responsible for the marketing) and will be positive. In addition, newspapers, magazines, radio and television programmes may carry stories about the making of the film; most of which would be positive. Distributors can be confident that coverage will be positive because of the nature of the 'publicity circus'. For instance, film magazines know if they are critical of a film star they are not likely to get to interview them in future. As stars are important selling points for the magazines this would be detrimental to their sales. Hence most non-review coverage accentuates the positive. Similarly stars and celebrities only appear on chat shows if they have an opportunity to plug their new film/song/album/book.


East is east promotion15 l.jpg
East is East - Promotion

Types of advertising and publicity

  • Advertising

  • banners on Internet

  • TV

  • radio

  • magazines

  • newspapers


East is east promotion16 l.jpg
East is East - Promotion

Types of advertising and publicity

  • billboards

  • Publicity

  • trailers

  • posters in cinemas

  • website

  • stunts


East is east promotion17 l.jpg
East is East - Promotion

Types of advertising and publicity

  • press (tabloids & broadsheet)

  • magazines

  • tie-ins (including single, music video, script, book, the making of documentary)

  • previews

  • broadcast

  • festivals

  • premieres


East is east promotion18 l.jpg
East is East - Promotion

Promotion: the East is East campaign

Campaign objective:

  • To position East is East in the media and in the public domain as a must-see, hugely successful, critically praised, hip, British comedy for all and everyone to enjoy.


East is east promotion19 l.jpg
East is East - Promotion

  • The East is East campaign very successfully positioned the film as a movie about generational conflict that appealed to all cultures. This was done by emphasising the 'universality' of having problems with parents and by emphasising the risqué ('rude') elements.


East is east promotion20 l.jpg
East is East - Promotion

Consider why each particular promotional vehicle was used:

  • Advertising

  • banners on Internet

  • TV

  • radio

  • magazines


East is east promotion21 l.jpg
East is East - Promotion

Consider why each particular promotional vehicle was used:

  • newspapers

  • billboards

  • Publicity

  • trailers

  • posters in cinemas


East is east promotion22 l.jpg
East is East - Promotion

Consider why each particular promotional vehicle was used:

  • website

  • press (tabloids & broadsheet) articles and reviews

  • magazine articles

  • tie-ins (including single, music video, script, book, the making of documentary)

  • previews


East is east promotion23 l.jpg
East is East - Promotion

Consider why each particular promotional vehicle was used:

  • broadcast

  • festivals

  • premiere

  • stunts


East is east promotion24 l.jpg
East is East - Promotion

  • In terms of generating publicity FilmFour had a 'hit list' of 'target media' through which they wanted to address their audience.


East is east audience l.jpg
East is East - Audience

  • The key concept of audience usually focuses on how an audience is targeted and how audiences read a text. The first part of this section considers how FilmFour used focus groups to find out whether East is East had universal appeal. The second part uses the 'uses and gratifications' theory to assess how audiences might experience the film.


East is east audience26 l.jpg
East is East - Audience

  • On paper, a film about an Anglo-Pakistani family set in Salford in the 1970s is a marketing nightmare; it does not sound appealing to a mass audience. Previous 'Asian-themed' films, such as Bhaji on the Beach (1994) had not played widely (in other words, they had not done good business at the box office). As most films are produced as a commodity, that is they are made in order to make money, this is clearly a problem. FilmFour sidestepped the issue by emphasising it was not 'Asian themed' but about being young; as one of the taglines put it: 'Young, free and soon not to be single‘.


East is east audience27 l.jpg
East is East - Audience

  • Hollywood, in particular, keenly uses focus groups to assess whether a film will be successful and will even re-shoot scenes if the previews are negative.


East is east audience28 l.jpg
East is East - Audience

  • Consider the statistics from the Wimbledon focus group:

    • The figures were very positive in all groupings. 25 years of age is a watershed for exhibitors as people are less likely to visit cinemas after that age. These are the core cinema-goers to whom a film must appeal if it is going to be a mainstream hit. These results were replicated elsewhere showing the distributors that, if they could successfully open the film, then they had a likely hit on their hands, as word of mouth would be positive. These positive results were no doubt engendered by the fact that the focus groups did not feel the 'ethnic' aspects affected their enjoyment.


East is east audience29 l.jpg
East is East - Audience

  • The following conclusions were drawn: East is East, it was clear, would play to a mainstream audience. The task of the promotion was to make sure that the cinema-going public would know that it was 'their sort of film'.


East is east audience30 l.jpg
East is East - Audience

  • The uses and gratifications theory suggests four ways in which audiences use films (and any other media texts). While the theory errs too much on the side of audience autonomy (it virtually denies the texts can affect individuals unless he or she wants it to) it remains a useful way of understanding how audiences may read a film.


East is east audience31 l.jpg
East is East - Audience

  • entertainment the text provides pleasure for the audience, this is often characterised as being 'escapist'. social interaction: films, the news or last night's television programmes are common topics of discussion; we use the media to feed this social interaction. personal identity: we can get a sense of ourselves and our peer group from films. We may identify with particular film stars, who we may even use as role models.information: the media are full of information which we are at liberty to use.


East is east audience32 l.jpg
East is East - Audience

  • Most films are produced as entertainment for this is what audiences most want and therefore the film is most likely to make money. Any film that becomes much talked about (social interaction) can be considered an 'event movie'. If you have not seen the 'event movie' then you are likely to be left out of conversations. Hollywood's box office suffered in 2000 through the lack of an 'event movie'; in 1999 the Star Wars prequel, The Sixth Sense and The Blair Witch Project were all films that generated buzz.


East is east audience33 l.jpg
East is East - Audience

  • Most films do not set out to provide information (documentaries aside), though they may do so as a 'side-effect', but films may help give us a sense of ourselves. In Britain we most often see North American society represented in films, which is physically distant to us. We see our own country represented less frequently; for Anglo-Asians the absence is much greater.


East is east audience34 l.jpg
East is East - Audience

  • Apply the uses and gratifications theory to East is East.

  • In what ways is the film entertaining?

  • Can you recall whether you talked about, or heard people talking about, the film?

  • Did you get any understanding of your own life from the film (maybe in terms of the conflict between parents and children)?

  • Did you learn anything from the film about the time and place and/or Anglo-Asians?


East is east l.jpg
East is East

  • When Channel 4 was launched in 1982 it launched Film on Four and so helped sustain the British film industry through its darkest days of that decade. Much of Film on Four's production reflected the commissioning editor's, David Rose, preference for 'contemporary and social political topics'. Films such as The Ploughman's Lunch (1983), Letter to Brezhnev (1985), Rita, Sue and Bob Too (1986) were commercial and critical successes. Film on Four also funded My Beautiful Laundrette (1985), which featured a homosexual relationship between a white fascist (Daniel Day-Lewis) and Omar (Gordon Warnecke) born in Britain to Pakistani parents.


East is east36 l.jpg
East is East

  • In the mid 1990s the then controller of Channel 4, Michael Grade, brokered a deal with the Government that allowed the channel to divert money it paid to the ITV companies (as part of an advertising airtime deal) into film production. FilmFour was first set up as an independent film production company and then also a film distributor. The company put up the whole budget for East is East after BBC Films had funded script development.


East is east37 l.jpg
East is East

  • FilmFour is sponsored by The Guardian newspapers. Why do you think this newspaper has chosen to pay to be associated with the type of films FilmFour produces?


East is east institution industry l.jpg
East is East – Institution/ Industry

  • As a key concept institution is often elided with industry. Basically, if we consider the business side of filmmaking we are looking at the industry; if we are considering the practices and regulatory restraints (such as the need to get a 15 certificate from the British Board of Film Classification) then we are looking at institutional aspects.


East is east institution industry39 l.jpg
East is East – Institution/ Industry

  • The elements below focus on the industrial factors in the production of East is East :

    FilmFour

    Distribution Exhibition


East is east institution industry40 l.jpg
East is East – Institution/ Industry

  • In relation to these three we should consider the notion of independence, an institutional way of thinking about media organisations.

    Independents


East is east independents l.jpg
East is East - Independents

  • FilmFour was classified as an independent as it was not part of a major media corporation. In fact there are no major British film companies. Polygram Film Entertainment (producers of Notting Hill 1999), which was based in London, operated as a mini-major until it was taken over by Seagram, in 1999, to become part of Universal Pictures. In 2000, the French company Vivendi, in turn, swallowed Universal.


East is east independents42 l.jpg
East is East - Independents

  • Independent film companies, whether producers or distributors, are much more financially vulnerable than the majors. In the 1980s the immensely successful Goldcrest (of Chariots of Fire, 1981, and Ghandi, 1982, fame) went bust after a number of expensive flops. Major film companies can usually survive lean years with help from other companies within the corporation. For example, 20th Century Fox had a relatively bad 1999, leading to the resignation of studio chief Bill Mechanic, but as it is part of Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation it was never likely to go bankrupt.


East is east independents43 l.jpg
East is East - Independents

  • British films have to compete with Hollywood's major film studios' blockbuster releases. The only UK produced film in the British top ten box office in 1999 was Notting Hill, which grossed £30.7 million (source Screen International, 1 September, 2000). Notting Hill was also a hit in North America, a rare occurrence for British films though much of the movie's appeal was probably due to Julia Roberts.


East is east independents44 l.jpg
East is East - Independents

  • There is a tendency for independent producers to make less commercial films than the major studios. This is partly a result of the economics of filmmaking, most strictly commercial films are expensive to make because they have big stars and/or many special effects. Low budget movies tend to be both starless and bereft of special effects and it is relatively rare for them to 'cross-over' into the mainstream to become a box office hit. In recent years The Full Monty (1997) and The Blair Witch Project (1998), along with East is East in Britain, have managed to be amongst the years' most successful films.


East is east independents45 l.jpg
East is East - Independents

  • Independent film-makers may also eschew commercial films because they are more interested in making a personal statement. In 1999 the Tim Roth directed film The War Zone, a bleak tale about child abuse, was never likely to trouble the box office charts.


East is east independents46 l.jpg
East is East - Independents

  • East is East was 18th in 1999's chart; a very respectable position especially as it was only released on 5 November 1999. It eventually grossed in excess of £10 million in Britain and Ireland alone. If we ignore Notting Hill with the 'Julia Roberts' factor, this made East is East the biggest Category A hit released in 1999. Category A is part of the British film institute's classification of a film's cultural and economic origins and is defined as:

    • Films where the cultural and financial impetus is from the UK and the majority of personnel are British. (Dyja, 1998, p. 18)


East is east independents47 l.jpg
East is East - Independents

  • One independent company that has a lot of success in making smaller budget movies box office successes is Miramax. This company distributed East is East, to moderate box office, in North America. Miramax, however, is only a quasi-independent as it is owned by Disney. It does, more or less, operate independently of its parent company.


East is east representation l.jpg
East is East - Representation

Representation is a multi-faceted key concept and it can be approached from these four perspectives:

  • What conventions are being used in the film to re-present the world?

  • Are the characters in the film meant to be representative of particular types (and are they stereotypes)?

  • What is the film trying to say (its preferred reading)?

  • Who is the intended audience and what sense do we think they will make of the film?


East is east representation49 l.jpg
East is East - Representation

  • Write down what connotations you associate with Islam? Your list of connotations will obviously depend upon many factors, not least of which is whether you are a Muslim. If you are not a Muslim, list your sources of information about Islam and any Muslim public figures you know.


East is east representation50 l.jpg
East is East - Representation

  • It is likely that the news gives many of us information about Islam as the media as a whole rarely represents Muslim, or indeed Asian, characters. One recent exception in Britain is the sketch show Goodness Gracious Me, which managed to disrupt the Asian stereotype that included the idea that Asians are not funny (and that white British are not interested in 'Asian television').


East is east representation51 l.jpg
East is East - Representation

  • East is East, too, managed to dispel the myth that a mainstream audience would not be interested in Asian characters (unless they were playing terrorist types as is True Lies, 1993). Leslee Udwin, the producer, described the prejudice she experienced:

    "You have no idea what kind of bigotry we came up against... It bordered on racism. We had number-crunching people saying, 'We don't believe a film that encompasses Asians can have a broad appeal.' Why the hell not? Why don't people say that about a film with Londoners?" (quoted in Minns, 1999, p. 7)


East is east representation52 l.jpg
East is East - Representation

  • It is to be hoped that the 'crunchers' choked on their numbers after the film took around £15 million at the British box office alone. It is clear that FilmFour Distributors (FFD) were aware of the difficulties in selling the film to the audience, as FFD's head of marketing said:

    "If you try and explain the film, it comes out as a film abut an Asian family set in Manchester in the '70s... When you get people through the door to see it, they love it."


East is east representation53 l.jpg
East is East - Representation

  • She was probably right in saying that selling a film about an Asian family to a mass British audience would be virtually impossible, but why is this the case? Why, do you think, mainstream audiences in Britain are not interested in Asian families? Soap operas, on the other hand, are immensely popular and mostly focus on white families.


East is east representation54 l.jpg
East is East - Representation

  • The film was marketed in a way that emphasised its 'universality'. The marketing was based on the assumption that many would see the fact that the film had Asian protagonists as a 'problem'.


East is east representation55 l.jpg
East is East - Representation

  • Gill Branston and Roy Stafford outlined the key questions about positive and negative representations:

    • how is a community represented?

    • what would count as a positive representations of the community?

    • the differences that the understandings of different audiences will make to the meanings of certain kinds of images, including genre competence, religious beliefs etc. (derived from Branston and Stafford, 1999, p. 130)


East is east representation56 l.jpg
East is East - Representation

  • We can adapt the above to ask specific questions about East is East; answer the following questions:

    • Make a list of your opinions about Ella, George, Tariq, Abdul and Maneer?

    • What do you think of the community, Salford 1971, in which the Khan family live? Is it the sort of place you would like to live? Are the people friendly? (You may find it useful to consider the opening sequence of the parade.)

    • What conclusions do you draw from the film about Islam? Think particularly of the character of George, the scene in the mosque and the characters' attitudes toward arranged marriages?


East is east representation57 l.jpg
East is East - Representation

  • In addition to this it is important to consider who is doing the representing. Images of the Anglo-Pakistani community made by a white Brit are likely to be very different those created by those within it. This is not to say that the latter is necessarily more accurate, simply that viewpoint will heavily influence the representation. For example, if a racist had made East is East the character of Earnest's dad would have been more sympathetically portrayed.


East is east representation58 l.jpg
East is East - Representation

  • The authorship of East is East is, like many of the film's characters, hybrid: Anglo-Pakistani Ayub Khan-Din wrote the screenplay and the film was directed by Irishman Damien O'Donnell. The film is based on Khan-Din's semi-autobiographical play, which was premiered at the Royal Court Theatre in 1997. Given this, the film is likely to be an authentic portrayal of both time and place, after all this is an Anglo-Pakistani (a rare voice in the media) speaking about his experiences. However when any minority group is represented things are never so straightforward.


East is east representation59 l.jpg
East is East - Representation

  • "any negative behavior by any member of the oppressed community is instantly generalized as typical... Representations thus become allegorical... Representations of dominant groups, on the other hand, are seen not a allegorical but as "naturally" diverse... A corrupt White politician is not seen as an "embarrassment to the race;"... Yet each negative image of an underrepresented group becomes... sorely overcharged with allegorical meaning..." (Shohat and Stam, 1994, p. 183)


East is east representation60 l.jpg
East is East - Representation

  • In other words, the character of George, in the context of Western culture, is no longer Ayub Khan-Din's dad but a representative of Islamic fathers. He becomes a type just as Ella is a typical working class northern woman replete with foul mouth, big heart and stoic suffering (she also feeds her children cookies for breakfast). Although both parents become types, drawing upon stereotypical images circulating in the media, George is the villain of the film hence Islam is tainted by his patriarchal stance. Ella, on the other hand, is more the victim and so deserves our sympathy; indeed, is literally the victim of George's violence.


East is east representation61 l.jpg
East is East - Representation

  • Similarly the milieu of the film, the working class community of Salford, seems, in these times of confessions of institutional racism in the light of Stephen Lawrence's murder, almost utopian. The Khans are seen as integrated into the community, their mixed race and cultural differences, driven by George, notwithstanding. The film opens with a Christian parade where the community happily colludes in hoodwinking George who, while he contentedly looks on, would be horrified to know his children had joined. The only racism evident is in the character of Earnest's granddad, who is clearly representative of an older and intolerant generation, and the night club bouncer. However his grandson is Sajid's best mate and his granddaughter, Stella, wants to marry Tariq. I doubt working class communities in Salford (or indeed middle class communities if such a thing exists), or anywhere else was this integrated.


East is east representation62 l.jpg
East is East - Representation

  • Britain was a far more racist society in the 1970s than it is now. Love Thy Neighbour was a popular sitcom at the time whose 'hero' was a racist with black neighbours; the Saturday night television show The Comedians featured many racist 'jokes' that now are only heard on the pub circuit.


East is east representation63 l.jpg
East is East - Representation

  • The East is East DVD featured four deleted scenes, two of which significantly alter the character of the Khan's social environment. One, on the Canal Bank, features the young people arguing after Peggy called Meenah a Paki. Tariq upbraids her, 'Who do you think you're calling a Paki?' 'Well you are aren't yer?' is Peggy's reply. Tariq averts his eyes acknowledging the truth that white people consider him Pakistani, whilst he considers himself English, although he is in fact Anglo-Pakistani. The Khan family's confusion about their identity is understandable.


East is east representation64 l.jpg
East is East - Representation

  • Nowhere in the film, as it was released, do we get a sense of the Khan family's isolation. It is the bigot Moorhouse who is isolated in his bitter and twisted ways. The youngsters in the Khan family can even agree with the racist politician Enoch Powell about sending their father 'back where he belongs'; they do not feel threatened.


East is east representation65 l.jpg
East is East - Representation

  • Another of the deleted scenes even more powerfully demonstrates the endemic racism of the times. Having resigned himself to marriage, Abdul goes to the pub for his 'stag night' where his work mates meet him. Once again, a member of the Khan family is seen integrated in white working class culture. However, the deleted scene shows what happens later in the evening when a group of black sailors enter the pub. Here Abdul's Scottish 'mate' starts making remarks about cannibalism and when Abdul starts to get upset, another says, 'don't worry, he's not talking about you, he's talking about the Sambos'. Abdul snaps and a fight ensues. He is then seen leaving the ironically named The Brit and returning home where he is consoled by a, for once, wholly sympathetic George.


East is east representation66 l.jpg
East is East - Representation

  • On the DVD, in the director's commentary, Damien O'Donnell states the scenes were deleted as they held back the narrative momentum that was driving toward the climax with the Shah family. He says that the pub fight was deleted when a member of the preview audience asked what was the point of the scene. After consideration, it was decided to take it out because, O'Donnell reckons, the racism that surrounds the Khans is abundantly clear from the rest of the film and shown with humour. As I have argued above, I do not think this is the case and I think the deletion of these two scenes is severely detrimental to an understanding of what it was actually like in Salford at this time. Obviously the scriptwriter felt they were necessary or he would not have written them.


East is east representation67 l.jpg
East is East - Representation

  • Whilst the representation of Salford (also the basis for Coronation Street) 1971 is contentious, the representation of gender is also questionable. Would the film be different if the women to whom Tariq and Abdul are meant to marry were good looking? Tariq is adamant he wants to marry an English woman so it appears he is against arranged marriages on principle. If this is the case why is it necessary that the brides to be should be ugly?


East is east representation68 l.jpg
East is East - Representation

  • The benign (the poverty excepted) representation of the social environment, added to the portrayal of George as the villain, make this a Eurocentric film. That is, the problems of Western culture (such as the endemic racism of the working class), Western economics (why were the Khan children forced to sleep three in a bed?) is rendered invisible while those of the Eastern culture, here arranged marriages, are highlighted.


East is east representation69 l.jpg
East is East - Representation

  • The commercial considerations of creating a crowd-pleasing climax, and taking out disturbing scenes, made our laughter rather hollow. For example, the line 'I'm not marryin' a fuckin' Paki' is funny but those who laugh have to ask what they are laughing at? The line is only funny if we presume that Tariq is a Paki, which he isn't.


East is east representation70 l.jpg
East is East - Representation

  • Compared to My Son the Fanatic (1997), for instance, where both West and East get a 'bad press', East is East is one-sided in its presentation of a clash of cultures. It is implicitly stating that 'west is best' an all too common representation that militates against understanding of other peoples. This does not matter if Western audiences can contexualise the film within a number of other representations, but some cannot, and it is probable that some who saw the film had their prejudices confirmed.


East is east representation71 l.jpg
East is East - Representation

  • It is an interesting case study in reception. I imagine 'Asian audiences' would recognise the characters as representative of individual types; many in the white audience, I suspect, see them as ethnic types (counting Northerners as ethnic).


East is east72 l.jpg
East is East

  • How the film did

    East is East, which cost £2.4 million to make, and was marketed through a £1 million campaign, made £10,373,945 at the UK Box Office and £4,177,818 at the US Box Office.


ad