Exploring american history unit vii becoming a world power
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 21

Exploring American History Unit VII – Becoming a World Power PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 68 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Exploring American History Unit VII – Becoming a World Power. Chapter 21 - The Progressive Spirit of Reform Section 2- Reforming the Workplace. Reforming the Workplace. The Big Idea In the early 1900s, Progressives and other reformers focused on improving conditions for American workers.

Download Presentation

Exploring American History Unit VII – Becoming a World Power

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Exploring american history unit vii becoming a world power

Exploring American HistoryUnit VII – Becoming a World Power

Chapter 21 - The Progressive Spirit of Reform

Section 2- Reforming the Workplace


Exploring american history unit vii becoming a world power

Reforming the Workplace

  • The Big Idea

  • In the early 1900s, Progressives and other reformers focused on improving conditions for American workers.

  • Main Ideas

  • Reformers attempted to improve conditions for child laborers.

  • Unions and reformers took steps to improve safety in the workplace and to limit working hours.


Lewis hines

Lewis Hines


Child labor

Child Labor

Sadie Pfeifer, 48 inches high. Has worked half a year.


Child labor1

Child Labor

  • Working conditions

  • The hours, the pay.

  • Factory children

  • Children who worked the fields.

  • These young workers could not

Breaker Boys" were used in the anthracite coal mines to separate slate rock from the coal after it had been brought out of the shaft. They often worked 14 to 16 hours a day.


Child labor2

Child Labor

  • 1938- the Fair Labor Standards Act was passed and children were freed from the bondage of dangerous work


Main idea 1 reformers attempted to improve conditions for child laborers

Main Idea 1:Reformers attempted to improve conditions for child laborers.

  • Marie Van Vorst.

  • Many children worked in.

  • Children.

  • Reformers wanted.


Child labor reform

Child-Labor Reform

  • Florence Kelley.

  • Massachusetts - 1912.

  • Congress passed.

    • The Supreme Court ruled the laws unconstitutional.


Reforming the workplace

Reforming the Workplace

  • Florence Kelly and the 1904- National Child Labor Committee.

    • .

    • .

  • Courts and Labor Laws

    • Lochner v. New York-.

    • Muller v. Oregon-.

  • Unions

    • ILGWU-.

    • IWW-


Triangle shirtwaist fire

Triangle Shirtwaist fire


Congress attempts to control child labor

Congress Attempts to Control Child Labor

In 1916 -Keating-Owen Act.

In 1918 the Supreme Court ruled that the Keating-Owen Act was unconstitutional.

Second Child Labor Law.

This legislation was declared unconstitutional as a result of the Drexel Furniture Company case in 1922.


Fair labor standards act

Fair Labor Standards Act

June, 1938, that Congress passed the Fair Labor Standards Act.


Improving conditions for children

Improving Conditions for Children

  • Identify - Where did children work?

  • Recall - What was the purpose of the National Consumer’s League?

  • Make Inferences – Why did some parents ask their employed children to lie about their age?


Exploring american history unit vii becoming a world power

Main Idea 2: Unions and reformers took steps to improve safety in the workplace and to limit working hours.

  • Workplace accidents were common in 1800s and early 1900s.

    • .

    • .

  • The Triangle Shirtwaist Fire.

  • Reformers fought for workers’ compensation laws

  • In 1902 Maryland.


The courts and labor

The Courts and Labor

  • Some businesses opposed workplace regulations.

  • New York passed a law in 1897 limiting bakers to a 10-hour workday.

    • Bakery owner Joseph Lochner sued.

    • In Lochner v. New York (1905), the Supreme Court ruled the law unconstitutional.

    • The court ruled that the state could not restrict employers from entering into any kind of agreement with employees.

  • In 1908 Muller v. Oregon.


Labor organizations

Labor Organizations

  • Labor unions tried

  • American Federation of Labor

  • Supported capitalism

  • socialism.

  • Industrial Workers of the World (IWW).


Safety and working conditions

Safety and Working Conditions

  • Identify – In what year did the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire take place?

  • Cause and Effect – Why were so many people killed in the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire?

  • Analyze – What are some possible reasons business leaders resisted government regulations?

  • Predict – If 500,000 people suffered industrial accidents today, what might happen to that industry as a result?


Safety and working conditions1

Safety and Working Conditions

  • Compare – How do capitalism and socialism differ?

  • Identify Cause and Effect – What was the effect of Lochner v. New York on employers?


  • Login