Non-Motor Contributions To Motion Deficits In Schizophrenia
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Non-Motor Contributions To Motion Deficits In Schizophrenia. Nestor Matthews 1,2 Bruce Luber 3,4 Ning Qian 2 Sarah H. Lisanby 3,4. Denison University, Dept. of Psychology 1 , Granville, OH, USA.

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Purpose

Non-Motor Contributions To Motion Deficits In Schizophrenia

Nestor Matthews1,2 Bruce Luber 3,4 Ning Qian2 Sarah H. Lisanby 3,4

Denison University, Dept. of Psychology1, Granville, OH, USA

Columbia University, Ctr. for Neurobiology & Behavior2, Dept. of Psychiatry3, Dept. of Biological Psychiatry4, New York, NY, USA

Purpose

Experimental Conditions

Discussion

It is well known that eye movements are

impaired in patients with schizophrenia.

Here we study motion sensitivity in

patients before eye movements occur.

We previously reported evidence

that separate neural events mediate

speed and direction discrimination

(Matthews et al 1999, 2001).

Same Stimulus, Different Task .... Same Task, Different Stimulus

Motion

Stimulus

Speed

Task

Motion

Stimulus

Direction

Task

Motion

Stimulus

Brightness

Task

Scrambled

Stimulus

Brightness

Task

Stationary

Stimulus

Brightness

Task

Stimuli & Task

Controls

Accordingly, a neuro-pathological

process, such as schizophrenia,

could in principle differentially affect

speed and direction discrimination.

A trial comprised two random-dot patterns,

each presented for a duration (200 ms)

too brief for reliable eye movements.

Patients

The task required judging the

speed, direction, or brightness of

the second stimulus relative to the first.

However, these data indicate that both

speed and direction discrimination

are impaired in patients. This is true

even before eye-movements have begun.

Results

Across these three tasks the stimuli

(schematized below) were identical.

Bottom Line

Our findings suggest that eye-

movement deficits in patients with

schizophrenia are at least partially

due to impaired perceptual input.

References

Matthews & Qian (1999). Axis-of-motion affects

speed discrimination, not direction discrimination.

Vision Research, 39(13), 2205-2211.

Matthews, Luber, Qian & Lisanby (2001).

Transcranial magnetic stimulation differentially

affects speed and direction judgments.

Experimental Brain Research, 140(4), 397-406.

We also held one of the tasks

(i.e., brightness discrimination) constant,

while manipulating the stimuli,

as described in the next panel.


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