Guidelines for Creating a Veterans-Friendly Campus

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Presenters. Dr. John Schupp SERV Program Director Cleveland State University . Jeff Johnson Director of the University of Rhode Island Veterans Affairs Program John Powers Independent Consultant, Operation Vets LLC. Who are returning veterans?. >1.9 million servicemembers have served in:Afghanistan (Operation Enduring Freedom, OEF)Iraq (Operation Iraqi Freedom, OIF) Surrounding countries (e.g., Kuwait, Qatar) providing support operations.>500,000 National Guard (NG)>1/329906

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Guidelines for Creating a Veterans-Friendly Campus

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1. Guidelines for Creating a Veterans-Friendly Campus

2. Presenters

3. Who are returning veterans? >1.9 million servicemembers have served in: Afghanistan (Operation Enduring Freedom, OEF) Iraq (Operation Iraqi Freedom, OIF) Surrounding countries (e.g., Kuwait, Qatar) providing support operations. >500,000 National Guard (NG) >1/3 of overall military force is NG/Reserve JP Vietnam VS Iraq/Afghanistan more NG and Reservists deployed (Leaving families and jobs..) Operation New Dawn (OND) 2010JP Vietnam VS Iraq/Afghanistan more NG and Reservists deployed (Leaving families and jobs..) Operation New Dawn (OND) 2010

4. Characteristics of Returning Veterans Compared to previous wars: More Women (12%) Older Age (27 vs. 23 Vietnam) Composition of Military (NG/Reserves 52% of OEF/OIF Veterans) Higher Wounded-to-Killed Ratio (16:1 VS. .7 TO 1.2:1 for all other wars) Baghdad/Germany/Walter Reed (72 hours) Multiple deployments (>34%) JPJP

5. Veteran Student Demographics Educational benefits: #1 reason why people join military Over 523, 000 veterans on campuses FY2008, expected increase 70% use a portion of education benefits 17 months on average 74% are on average 20-34 years old 24% - 20-24 years old 30% - 25-29 years old 20% - 30-34 years old 68% male, 32% female 51% never married, 37% married JP One VA statistic also worth noting is that while most veterans are eligible for 36 months of education benefits, only 6% exhaust their benefits. While many veterans may have accomplished their initial educational goal by using only 18 months of benefits, it may also suggest a serious retention problem. 2008 statisticsJP One VA statistic also worth noting is that while most veterans are eligible for 36 months of education benefits, only 6% exhaust their benefits. While many veterans may have accomplished their initial educational goal by using only 18 months of benefits, it may also suggest a serious retention problem. 2008 statistics

6. What are veterans facing on the college front? All service members, whether or not they have seen combat, face a major transition when they return from military to civilian and/or college life. Transition Issues Information Social Psychological/Physical Financial Foreign Environment of Academia JP Problems Veterans Face Upon Deciding to go to college: 1) Structural Problems- Pay for up front tuition costs or rent, mortgage, food, living expenses……. 2) Many veterans don’t know what educational benefits they are entitled to. 3) Bureaucratic struggle- Paperwork, paying for school, come from an organized structure “military” vs “chaos” of college campus. Structure/Unstructured environment Foreign Informational Barriers Lack of resources and stable programs on campus (Staffing/Knowledge) Veterans are not typical admissions applicants Info —easy access to good information about transfer credit, financial aid, orientation for adult learners (Pin ball effect) Unique Social Barriers with other students Social —Older than typical freshman students (Women Veterans) Physical Injuries/Mental Health Issues and/or Trauma-Related Barriers Anxiety, Depression, PTSD, TBI Environment (Structured Vs Unstructured) Concentration Financial Barriers GI Bill programs are complex Financial — Stress of late GI Bill payments or lack of payments (Post-9/11) Foreign Environment – unstructured - Loss of sense of purpose and lack of camaraderie, Being on active duty “It’s kind of like being a race car driver and all of sudden you are stuck driving 65 mph.” Navy Veteran Environment (have not been to school in years) Daunting place for many veterans… Ex) easier to be in iraq than schoolJP Problems Veterans Face Upon Deciding to go to college: 1) Structural Problems- Pay for up front tuition costs or rent, mortgage, food, living expenses……. 2) Many veterans don’t know what educational benefits they are entitled to. 3) Bureaucratic struggle- Paperwork, paying for school, come from an organized structure “military” vs “chaos” of college campus. Structure/Unstructured environment Foreign Informational Barriers Lack of resources and stable programs on campus (Staffing/Knowledge) Veterans are not typical admissions applicants Info —easy access to good information about transfer credit, financial aid, orientation for adult learners (Pin ball effect) Unique Social Barriers with other students Social —Older than typical freshman students (Women Veterans) Physical Injuries/Mental Health Issues and/or Trauma-Related Barriers Anxiety, Depression, PTSD, TBI Environment (Structured Vs Unstructured) Concentration Financial Barriers GI Bill programs are complex Financial — Stress of late GI Bill payments or lack of payments (Post-9/11) Foreign Environment – unstructured - Loss of sense of purpose and lack of camaraderie, Being on active duty “It’s kind of like being a race car driver and all of sudden you are stuck driving 65 mph.” Navy Veteran Environment (have not been to school in years) Daunting place for many veterans… Ex) easier to be in iraq than school

7. Beyond Benefits What does Veteran Friendly Really Mean? “Veteran-friendly" refers to marked efforts made by individual campuses to identify and remove barriers to the educational goals of veterans, to create smooth transitions from military life to college life, and to provide information about available benefits and services. Title: The name assigned to the document by the author. This field may also contain sub-titles, series names, and report numbers. A Statewide Approach to Creating Veteran-Friendly Campuses Authors: Personal author, compiler, or editor name(s); click on any author to run a new search on that name. Lokken, Jayne M.; Pfeffer, Donald S.; McAuley, James; Strong, ChristopherTitle: The name assigned to the document by the author. This field may also contain sub-titles, series names, and report numbers. A Statewide Approach to Creating Veteran-Friendly Campuses Authors: Personal author, compiler, or editor name(s); click on any author to run a new search on that name. Lokken, Jayne M.; Pfeffer, Donald S.; McAuley, James; Strong, Christopher

8. Creating a Veteran Friendly Campus

9. Supportive Veteran Friendly Practices Veterans Office Review campus policies Tuition/Fee Deferments, Military Activation, Transfer Credit, Readmission Student Veterans Organization (Vet2Vet) U of Arizona Student Organization of Year External connections Faculty/staff awareness Specific Veteran Website Institutional Commitment Retention Jp Veterans Office (Coordinates services, create programs, advocate for students)—Insitutitional point of contact--Knowledgale Transition POC (Very Important-Checklists, orientations SVO (vet2vets models… mention sva) SVO Activities Informal social meetings that serve as peer support groups Benefits seminars Publication of newsletters and brochures Local service projects and volunteer work Pre-professional networking External Contacts (VA, Vet center, VBA, Voc Rehab, Community organizations Jp Veterans Office (Coordinates services, create programs, advocate for students)—Insitutitional point of contact--Knowledgale Transition POC (Very Important-Checklists, orientations SVO (vet2vets models… mention sva) SVO Activities Informal social meetings that serve as peer support groups Benefits seminars Publication of newsletters and brochures Local service projects and volunteer work Pre-professional networking External Contacts (VA, Vet center, VBA, Voc Rehab, Community organizations

10. Making the Dream Come True

11. Dream in Progress Transition Programming Intake Form Checklist Welcome Packets Master List Files Contact List OutreachTransition Programming Intake Form Checklist Welcome Packets Master List Files Contact List Outreach

12. Questions, answers and comments

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