From demand to disinterest contexts for policy influence
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 17

From Demand to Disinterest: Contexts for Policy Influence PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 44 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

From Demand to Disinterest: Contexts for Policy Influence. Fred Carden International Development Research Centre October 2005. The Study.

Download Presentation

From Demand to Disinterest: Contexts for Policy Influence

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


From demand to disinterest contexts for policy influence

From Demand to Disinterest:Contexts for Policy Influence

Fred Carden

International Development Research Centre

October 2005


The study

The Study

IDRC will foster and support the production, dissemination and application of research results leading to policies and technologies that enhance the lives of people in developing countries.

IDRC Program Directions 2000-2005


The framework

The Framework

Expanding Policy Capacities

Broadening Policy Horizons

Affecting Policy Regimes


Dimensions of analysis

Dimensions of Analysis

What we do (inputs)

Where we do it (context)

How we do it (action)


Where external factors

Where: External Factors

Stability of decision-making institutions

Capacity of decision-makers to use research

Decentralization vs tight control

Countries in « transition »

Economic pressures


Where context matters

Where: Context Matters

  • Policy Maker Demand

  • Policy Maker Interest, Leadership Gap

  • Policy Maker Interest, Resources Gap

  • Policy Maker Neutral, Research Interest

  • Policy Maker Disinterest, Research Interest

time


Changes in context

Changes in Context

Clear demand: MIMAP-S, Nepal ICTs, Viet Nam, Acacia (South Africa, Mozambique, Senegal, Uganda)

Policy Maker interest/leadership gap: TEHIP, MIMAP-B, MIMAP-P, LATN, G-24

PM interest, resources gap: Ukraine

PM neutral, research interest: High Altitude Mining, ECAPAPA, Arsaal (local), AFSSRN, SRISTI, Jordan, Copper Mining

PM disinterest, research interest: Syria, Arsaal (national)


Changes in context1

Changes in Context

Clear demand: MIMAP-S, Nepal ICTs, Viet Nam, Acacia (South Africa, Mozambique, Senegal, Uganda)

AFSSRN, SRISTI

Policy Maker interest/leadership gap: TEHIP, MIMAP-B, MIMAP-P, LATN, G-24

Copper Mining, Jordan

PM interest, resources gap : Ukraine

Arsaal (Local)

PM neutral, research interest :

PM disinterest, research interest : Syria, Arsaal (national)

ECAPAPA, High Altitude Mining


Afterword on use

Afterword on Use

Influence on Centre thinking

Re-shaping the conversation

Focusing thinking

Evolving practice

Evolving futures

Influence on Centre profile

The story of influence

The story of the study


From demand to disinterest contexts for policy influence1

From Demand to Disinterest:Contexts for Policy Influence

http://www.idrc.ca/evaluation/policy


What resources

What: Resources

More money does not mean more influence

but it does make a difference

Other factors:

Intellectual contributions

Technical contributions

Previous history with recipient

Development projects as part of research


What intent

What: Intent

No 1:1 correspondence between intent and influence

Explicit intent encourages success

especially if the intent is shared

Researcher intent matters most

Other factors:

Context

Level of influence (local/national)

Timeline for results


What idrc role

What: IDRC Role

Role evolves over time

Build researcher capacities

(quality, reputation, policy relevant research, communications)

Level the playing field

Build the capacity of policy makers


How partnerships

How: Partnerships

Factors in Effective partnerships/networks:

Researchers: willingness, capacity, skills & resources

Map out structures & develop strategies early on

Create partnerships that reflect all stakeholders

Common vision – coordinate efforts among partners


How communications

How: Communications

Communication through information

Passing on information

Dialogue about the findings

Follow-up with key stakeholders

Communication through people

Policymakers as researchers

Researchers as policy entrepreneurs

Finding allies


How time

How: Time

External:

Government support: policy windows

Internal:

Relationships

Reputation

Persistence

Project cycle:

Supply approach – capacity & enlightenment

Demand approach -responsive


In conclusion

In Conclusion

Essential elements

Identification of key decision makers

Building relations of trust

Some tensions to consider

Advanced planning vs. flexibility

IDRC contributions (+/-)

Inclusion of all stakeholders

Opportunities vs. funding cycles


  • Login