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I’m a Poet and Didn’t Know It!. Student Page. [ Teacher Page ]. Title. Introduction. Task. A WebQuest for 5th Grade Reading – Elements of Poetry. Process. Evaluation. Designed by. Conclusion. Brenda Cassels. [email protected] Credits. Introduction. Student Page.

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I m a poet and didn t know it

I’m a Poet and Didn’t Know It!

Student Page

[Teacher Page]

Title

Introduction

Task

A WebQuest for 5th Grade Reading – Elements of Poetry

Process

Evaluation

Designed by

Conclusion

Brenda Cassels

[email protected]

Credits


Introduction

Introduction

Student Page

[Teacher Page]

Title

What does your favorite song have to do with poetry? Poetry can be found in many places. Many songs are poetry that has been put to music. Listen for the poetry the next time you are listening to your favorite CD. We’ll take a look at some of today’s popular music as we dig into the elements of poetry. Your team will analyze, create, and produce poems to present as a PowerPoint.

Introduction

Task

Process

Evaluation

Conclusion

Essential Questions:

How do understanding poetic devices help me to better understand the author’s purpose behind their poem?

How is meaning in prose and poetry affected by imagery, rhythm, flow, or figurative language?

Credits

*Songs and Lyrics


The task

The Task

Student Page

[Teacher Page]

  • You are on a quest to learn more about poetry! Here are a few activities you’ll be working on:

  • Learn about poetry terms and find samples in poems.

  • Label poetry elements in popular songs

  • Create your own poems.

  • Go on an internet scavenger hunt to find out more about different types of poems and famous poets.

  • Keep a notebook on your discoveries.

  • Produce a PowerPoint presentation to share with the class.

Title

Introduction

Task

Process

Evaluation

Conclusion

Credits


The process

The Process

Student Page

[Teacher Page]

You will be a member of a team of 4 students. Decide who will have each role on the team. These include:

- Producer : Ensure that the group notebook includes all key elements of the assignment and make sure due dates are met.

- Graphic Designer: Ensures that the visual presentation contains relevant and high quality images for each powerpoint slide.

- Lead Singer: Provide the main voice for the presentation.

- Manager: Facilitate the work progress, keep team members on track, provide positive feedback, & assist those who need help.

Title

Introduction

Task

Process

Evaluation

Conclusion

Part 1 Part 2

Part 3 Part 4

Credits


Part 1 explore and apply

Part 1Explore and Apply!

  • View Elements of Poetry PowerPoint. Make a Wordle using all of the elements. This will be the cover sheet for your notebook.

  • Visit these 2 poetry websites. Read an assortment of poems and find examples of all of the elements of poetry. Poetry4kidsGigglePoetry

    Write the name of the poetry technique, then write the entire line from the lyric in your notebook. EX. simile -- Her eyes were like twinkling diamonds

  • Now let’s apply what you’ve learned to our song lyrics. Take another look at the 4 songs from our introduction. Label any of the lyrics that use the elements of poetry. Label directly on the song lyric copy in your notebook.

Go to Part 2

Back to Process


Part 2 time to try your hand at writing poetry

Part 2Time to try your hand at writing poetry!

  • Follow this link to see samples of different types of poems. On the left-hand side, choose these four (Holiday Poem, I Once Knew, Limerick, Little Rhyme). Use the model to write your own in your notebook.

  • Try an online Diamante Poem. Write yours in your notebook.

  • Try your hand at an Acrostic Poem. Print it out for your notebook.

Go to Part 3

Back to Process


Part 3 scavenger hunt

Part 3Scavenger Hunt

  • Who is one of the most famous writers of Limerick? Write your own Limerick.

  • Listen to Mr. Prelutsky read his own poem "Louder than a Clap of Thunder". What are five of the comparisons to how loud father snores?

  • Brod Bagert's poetry can leave you rolling on the floor. As a poet what does he recommend to do to develop your voice as a writer, to understand poems, and woo the one you love?

  • Visit Poet Kenn Nesbitt and his site Poetry for Kids. Click on frequently asked questions. What does Mr. Nesbitt say about why he writes poetry?

  • Visit the site of Robert Pottle. From his list of funny poems, choose two of them to read and then rate it. Then find out what the name of the teacher is that left the voice mail message!

Title a page in your notebook “Scavenger Hunt” for your responses to the following:

Go to Part 4

Back to Process


Part 4 powerpoint instructions

Part 4PowerPoint Instructions

  • Title slide

  • Four or more slides of your teams’ original poems that illustrate an example of each element

  • One song labeled with two or more elements

  • Scavenger Hunt responses

  • One slide about your teams’ favorite author that you discovered on this webquest and a sample of his/her work

  • Credits

  • References

Back to Process


Evaluation

Evaluation

Student Page

[Teacher Page]

Title

Introduction

Task

Process

Evaluation

Conclusion

Credits


Conclusion

Conclusion

Student Page

[Teacher Page]

Title

Congrats to your team for doing your best,

You have successfully completed your poetry webquest!

You see how all of the elements affects poetry today

And maybe you discovered some hidden talents along the way.

Your research proved that poets continue to learn more each day

And always strive to improve their work in every way.

So, here are some additional websites to explore,

Who knows, maybe you will be the featured poet at the local bookstore!

Introduction

Task

Process

Evaluation

Conclusion

http://www.poetry4kids.com/

http://www.gigglepoetry.com/poemcategories.aspx

http://teacher.scholastic.com/writewit/poetry/

http://www.funbrain.com/idioms/index.html

Credits


Credits references

Credits & References

Student Page

[Teacher Page]

Georgia Performance Standards – 5th grade

Amazon.com

Webquest template http://webquest.org/index.php

Microsoft Clip Art http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/

Brown, Calef. Dutch Sneakers and Flea Keepers. New York, NY: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2000.

Cassedy, Sylvia. Zoomrimes. New York, NY: Harper Collins, 1993.

Dakos, Kalli. If You’re Not Here, Please Raise Your Hand. New York, NY: Macmillan, 1990.

Esbaum, Jill. Stanza. New York, NY: Harcourt, 2009.

Florian, Douglas. Lizards, Frogs, and Polliwogs. Orlando, FL: Harcourt, 2001.

Hoberman, Mary Ann. Fathers, Mothers, Sisters, Brothers. Boston, MA: Little, Brown and Company, 1991.

Hopkins, Lee Bennett. Happy Birthday. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster, 1995.

Hopkins, Lee Bennett. Sports! Sports! Sports! USA: Harper Collins, 1999.

Kennedy, Dorothy. I Thought I’d Take My Rat to School. New York, NY: Little, Brown and Company, 1993.

MacLachlan, Patricia. Once I Ate a Pie. New York, NY: Harper Collins, 2006.

Pomerantz, Charlotte. Halfway to Your House. New York, NY: Greenwillow Books, 1993.

Prelutsky, Jack. For Laughing Out Loud. New York, NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 1991.

Prelutsky, Jack. The Random House Book of Poetry for Children. New York, NY: Random House, 1983.

Schertle, Alice. Advice for a Frog. New York, NY: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard Books, 1995.

Schertle, Alice. A Lucky Thing. New York, NY: Harcourt, Inc., 1997.

Sierra, Judy. There’s a Zoo in Room 22. New York, NY: Harcourt, Inc., 2000.

Silverstein, Shel. A Light in the Attic. New York, NY: Harper Collilns Publishers, 1981.

Zolotow, Charlotte. Snippets. New York, NY: Harper Collins, 1992.

Title

Introduction

Task

Process

Evaluation

Conclusion

Credits


I m a poet and didn t know it1

I’m A Poet and Didn’t Know It!

[Student Page]

Teacher Page

A WebQuest for 5th Grade Reading

Title

Introduction

Designed by

Learners

Brenda Cassels

[email protected]

Standards

Process

Resources

Evaluation

Conclusion

Credits

Based on a template from The WebQuest Page


Introduction teacher

Introduction (Teacher)

[Student Page]

Teacher Page

This webquest was produced for 5th grade students of ES School. The Media Specialist collaborated with the 5th grade Language Arts/Reading teachers to provide a motivating unit to teach specific standards using technology.

After carefully analyzing data from the latest Thinkgate Benchmark test in Language Arts / Reading the areas of weakness for our 5th graders were GPS ELA5R1.1.f and k.

ELA5R1 The student demonstrates comprehension and shows evidence of a warranted and responsible explanation of a variety of literary and informational texts.

For literary texts, the student identifies the characteristics of various genres and

produces evidence of reading that:

f. Identifies and analyzes the author’s use of dialogue and description. (42%)

k. Identifies common structures and stylistic elements (e.g., hyperbole, refrain,

simile) in traditional literature. (39%)

Unit Essential Questions

- How do understanding poetic devices help me to better understand the author’s purpose behind their poem?

- How is meaning in prose and poetry affected by imagery, rhythm, flow, or figurative language?

Title

Introduction

Learners

Standards

Process

Resources

Evaluation

Conclusion

Credits


Learners teacher

Learners (Teacher)

[Student Page]

Teacher Page

  • The unit was designed for 5th graders, but could be used in grades four or higher. It will not only cover the focus standards, but many other standards in ELA5R1 along with ILS and NETS-S Standards for 21st Century Learners. It incorporates technology and cooperative learning teams and introduces students to various Web 2.0 tools. It would be helpful, but not crucial, for students to have some keyboarding skills.

  • Higher order thinking skills and communication skills are encouraged by this lesson. Those include:

  • Inference-making

  • Critical thinking

  • Creative production

  • Creative problem-solving

  • Teamwork

  • Key Skills

  • Students will be able to…

  • Locate resources

  • Scan for relevant information

  • Interpret the information

  • Communicate the information

  • Evaluate the product and process

Title

Introduction

Learners

Standards

Process

Resources

Evaluation

Conclusion

Credits


Curriculum standards teacher

Curriculum Standards (Teacher)

[Student Page]

Teacher Page

  • Upon completion of this webquest students will be able to:

  • (GPS)

  • identify common structures and stylistic elements in traditional literature.

  • identify and analyze the author’s use of dialogue and description.

  • determine how meaning in prose and poetry is affected by imagery, rhythm, flow, or figurative

  • language, such as (personification, metaphor, simile, hyperbole, refrain)

  • (Information Literacy Standards)

  • use strategies to locate, evaluate, and use information for specific purposes.

  • organize information for practical application

  • integrate new information into one’s own knowledge

  • apply information in critical thinking and problem solving

  • access information efficiently and effectively

  • evaluate information critically and competently

  • use information effectively and creatively

  • practice ethical behavior in regard to information and information technology

  • participate effectively in groups to pursue and generate information

  • appreciate and enjoy literature and other creative expressions of information

  • (NETS-S)

  • apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes

  • create original works as a means of personal or group expression

  • interact, collaborate, and publish with peers employing a variety of digital environments and media

  • communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats

  • contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems

  • plan strategies to guide inquiry

  • locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of

  • sources and media

  • plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project

  • collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions

  • exhibit a positive attitude toward using technology that supports collaboration, learning, and

  • productivity

  • demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning

  • understand and use technology systems

Title

Introduction

Learners

Standards

Process

Resources

Evaluation

Conclusion

Credits


The process teacher

The Process (Teacher)

[Student Page]

Teacher Page

This unit will take 2 – 3 weeks to complete, depending on the amount of time students have in the computer lab. Classroom teacher will assign students to teams heterogeneously with various academic levels on each team. Standards associated with this unit will be introduced prior to beginning the Webquest. Parts of the Webquest will be whole group in the computer lab or classroom, while other parts will be teams working with the Media Specialist.

To begin this unit read Stanza by Jill Esbaum. Follow this by listening to songs that are popular with students of this age. Then play the song Figurative Language.

Whole class will view Elements of Poetry PowerPoint. Each team will make a Wordle using all of the elements. This will be the cover sheet for each notebook.

Teams will visit these 2 poetry websites to read an assortment of poems and find examples of all of the elements of poetry. Poetry4kidsGigglePoetry

Teams will write the name of the poetry technique, then write the entire line from the lyric in their notebook. EX. simile -- Her eyes were like twinkling diamonds

Teams will then apply what they’ve learned to the song lyrics. They will take another look at the 4 songs from the introduction and label any of the lyrics that use the elements of poetry. Each team will label directly on the song lyric copy in their notebook.

Teams will follow this link to see samples of different types of poems. On the left-hand side, choose these four (Holiday Poem, I Once Knew, Limerick, Little Rhyme). They will use the model to write their own in the notebook.

Each team will try an online Diamante Poem and write it in their notebook.

They will then try an Acrostic Poem and print it out for their notebook.

Each team will then follow the links provided to find the answers for the Scavenger Hunt (see student page).

Teams will work with Media Specialist to produce a PowerPoint to share with the class.

Title

Introduction

Learners

Standards

Process

Resources

Evaluation

Conclusion

Credits


Resources teacher

Resources (Teacher)

[Student Page]

Teacher Page

  • Materials needed to implement this lesson

  • Teacher computer with projector or Smartboard

  • Students computers – 1 per group of four

  • Internet access

  • Printer

  • Notebooks for each group of four

  • Copies of song lyrics in each notebook

  • Software – Microsoft Powerpoint

  • Pencils & paper

  • Assortment of poetry books

  • This unit was planned with the idea of two teachers to guide students (classroom teacher and Media Specialist). If there are parent volunteers available, that would be awesome!

Title

Introduction

Learners

Standards

Process

Resources

Evaluation

Conclusion

Credits


Evaluation teacher

Evaluation (Teacher)

[Student Page]

Teacher Page

Title

Introduction

Learners

Standards

Process

Resources

Evaluation

Conclusion

Credits


Conclusion teacher

Conclusion (Teacher)

[Student Page]

Teacher Page

In this webquest, we will engage students and incorporate technology to facilitate experiences for advanced student learning. Students will be active learners who are motivated by meaningful content. Collaborating and cooperating in team efforts, along with applying strategies for problem-solving will enrich the learning environment supported by technology. By using songs that are favorites of this age level we are giving students authentic, real-world connections between learning and their everyday lives.

Title

Introduction

Learners

Standards

Process

Resources

Evaluation

Conclusion

Credits


Credits references teacher

Credits & References (Teacher)

[Student Page]

Teacher Page

Georgia Performance Standards – 5th grade

Amazon.com

Webquest template http://webquest.org/index.php

Microsoft Clip Art http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/

Brown, Calef. Dutch Sneakers and Flea Keepers. New York, NY: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2000.

Cassedy, Sylvia. Zoomrimes. New York, NY: Harper Collins, 1993.

Dakos, Kalli. If You’re Not Here, Please Raise Your Hand. New York, NY: Macmillan, 1990.

Esbaum, Jill. Stanza. New York, NY: Harcourt, 2009.

Florian, Douglas. Lizards, Frogs, and Polliwogs. Orlando, FL: Harcourt, 2001.

Hoberman, Mary Ann. Fathers, Mothers, Sisters, Brothers. Boston, MA: Little, Brown and Company, 1991.

Hopkins, Lee Bennett. Happy Birthday. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster, 1995.

Hopkins, Lee Bennett. Sports! Sports! Sports! USA: Harper Collins, 1999.

Kennedy, Dorothy. I Thought I’d Take My Rat to School. New York, NY: Little, Brown and Company, 1993.

MacLachlan, Patricia. Once I Ate a Pie. New York, NY: Harper Collins, 2006.

Pomerantz, Charlotte. Halfway to Your House. New York, NY: Greenwillow Books, 1993.

Prelutsky, Jack. For Laughing Out Loud. New York, NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 1991.

Prelutsky, Jack. The Random House Book of Poetry for Children. New York, NY: Random House, 1983.

Schertle, Alice. Advice for a Frog. New York, NY: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard Books, 1995.

Schertle, Alice. A Lucky Thing. New York, NY: Harcourt, Inc., 1997.

Sierra, Judy. There’s a Zoo in Room 22. New York, NY: Harcourt, Inc., 2000.

Silverstein, Shel. A Light in the Attic. New York, NY: Harper Collilns Publishers, 1981.

Zolotow, Charlotte. Snippets. New York, NY: Harper Collins, 1992.

Title

Introduction

Learners

Standards

Process

Resources

Evaluation

Conclusion

Credits


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