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PROGRESS REPORT: FOOD SAFETY PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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PROGRESS REPORT: FOOD SAFETY. Dr Andrew Wadge Director of Food Safety. Public Health Impact. In 2006 between 500 and 600 people died as a direct result of something they ate – mostly due to food poisoning. Economic Impact - Costs. Economic Impact - Savings.

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PROGRESS REPORT: FOOD SAFETY

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Progress report food safety l.jpg

PROGRESS REPORT: FOOD SAFETY

Dr Andrew Wadge

Director of Food Safety


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Public Health Impact

  • In 2006 between 500 and 600 people died as a direct result of something they ate – mostly due to food poisoning


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Economic Impact - Costs


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Economic Impact - Savings


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Risk Matrix – relative risk of pathogens, 2005


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Geographical Differences in Major Pathogens within UK

Rates of cases (per 1,000,000 of population) - 2005

Statistically significant difference between countries indicated by differing colours

Source: HPA & HPS data analysed in work for FBD risk matrix (FSA)


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Within-year trends for cases of Campylobacter: England & Wales –

data from 1992-2006

Source:

HPA


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Late-spring increase in Campylobacter

  • Sharp increase in cases ~mid-May, peak in June

  • Not caused solely by increasing temperature

  • Possible reasons:

    • Bird-pecked milk†

    • Barbequed food†

    • Flies hatching

†Supporting evidence in: Campylobacter Sentinel Surveillance Scheme 2000-2003.


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Weeks either side

of birthday

~ constant rest of year

Birthdays increase your risk of Campylobacter!

~25% higher instance of Campylobacter around birthday (± 1 week )

Source: Campylobacter Sentinel Surveillance Scheme 2000-3


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Carcass and Meat Pathogen Levels

Salmonella

  • Carcasses samples testing +ve (1999 → 2003): Cattle↑ Sheep↑Pig→

  • Level in retail chickens ?

  • Level in UK Eggs ↓ (1995/6 → 2003)

    Campylobacter

  • Carcasses samples testing +ve (1999 → 2003): Cattle↑ Sheep↑Pig↓

  • Level in retail chickens ?

    Pathogen levels in the Slaughterhouse

  • On carcasses (2002 → 2005): Cattle↓ Sheep↓ Pig↓

  • On environmental surfaces ↓ (2002 → 2005)


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Estimated impact by food group of indigenous food borne disease – top 7 foods (1996 – 2000)

†Complex foods: dishes consisting of ingredients of various food types in which the precise source of infection was not verified. They tend to contain chicken or eggs and consequently follow a similar pattern to these food types.

Source: Adak et al. (2005): Emerging Infectious Diseases 11 (3), 365-372.


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Summary – Life Style Choices

Conclusion: In general, lifestyle choices have a higher risk of food borne disease associated with them (over the time period of the Food borne Disease Strategy)


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Impact of Interventions

Progress -

19.2% cut in food-borne diseases 2000-05

  • 1.5 million cases

  • 38,000 hospital bed days

  • £750m to society as a whole

    How -

    Reduce contamination of meat and eggs in the food supply chain

  • on-farm

  • in slaughterhouses

  • in retail and distribution

  • in the home:

    Action taken by industry has reduced the level of Salmonella contamination of chicken from 37% in 1993/94 to less than 6% in 2001;

    An estimated 70% of chickens sold are contaminated with Campylobacter


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Historical & Future Drivers

  • Changing Population:

    • People living longer

    • Immigration

  • Personal Affluence:

    • Alters diet

    • Warmer houses in winter, cooler in summer

  • Travel

    • Overseas

    • To the supermarket – bringing home frozen foods

  • Lifestyle

    • Time available for preparation

    • Choices

Source: Institute of Grocery Distribution


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Historical & Future Drivers

  • Globalisation

    • International sourcing of foods

    • Large-scale operations

    • Consolidation and centralisation of food production

    • Increased automation of food production

  • Product formulation

    • Changes in levels of preservatives, etc.

    • Drive to reduce salt (FSA)

  • EU Hygiene Legislation

Source: Institute of Grocery Distribution


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Potential Future Drivers

  • Technology:

    • Genetic modification

    • Sensors ensure correct storage/ heating

    • New packing materials

    • Household stock management: use of Artificial Intelligence

    • Cooking instructions fed into microwave directly

  • Sustainability

    • drive to reduce waste => thinner packaging materials

    • drive to use left-overs, use up all food

Source: Institute of Grocery Distribution


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Climate Change

  • ~2.5-3ºC increase in UK mean temperature by 2100

  • Increased temperature could lead to:

    • more rapid multiplication of micro-organisms throughout the food chain

    • change in diet

    • more barbecues

  • Regression analysis indicates a 1ºC temp. rise would increase:

    • all food borne disease by ~5% (Bentham, 1997)

    • Salmonella in the UK by ~12% (Kovats et al., 2004)

  • More extreme weather events

Source: Health Effects of Climate Change in the UK (2007)

Dept. Health and HPA


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