U.S. fighter jets fly to S.Korea
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The South Korean president on Monday warned North Korea that any hostile moves will be met with "a strong response" as the United States deployed stealth fighter jets in the tense region as part of joint military exercises. President Park Geun-hye’s comments came after North Korea made remarks over the weekend, declaring that it had entered a "state of war" with the South and labeling the U.S. mainland as vulnerable to attack. The two Koreas are technically still at war after their conflict in the early 1950s ended in a truce not a peace treaty. The secretive North Korean regime of Kim Jong Un has delivered a steady stream of verbal attacks against South Korea and the United States in recent weeks, including the threat of a nuclear strike. It has lashed out at the U.S.-South Korean military drills currently under way and at the tougher U.N. sanctions that were placed on it after its latest nuclear test in February. Analysts have expressed heavy skepticism that the North has the military capabilities to follow through on many of its melodramatic threats. But concerns remain that it could carry out a localized attack on South Korea.


In other news
In Other News any hostile moves will be met with "a strong response" as the United States deployed stealth fighter jets in the tense region as part of joint military exercises. President Park Geun-hye’s comments came after North Korea made remarks over the weekend, declaring that it had entered a "state of war" with the South and labeling the U.S. mainland as vulnerable to attack. The two Koreas are technically still at war after their conflict in the early 1950s ended in a truce not a peace treaty. The secretive North Korean regime of Kim Jong Un has delivered a steady stream of verbal attacks against South Korea and the United States in recent weeks, including the threat of a nuclear strike. It has lashed out at the U.S.-South Korean military drills currently under way and at the tougher U.N. sanctions that were placed on it after its latest nuclear test in February. Analysts have expressed heavy skepticism that the North has the military capabilities to follow through on many of its melodramatic threats. But concerns remain that it could carry out a localized attack on South Korea.

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  • Former South African President Nelson Mandela's condition continues to improve. Mandela, 94, was readmitted last week to an unidentified hospital due to a recurring lung infection. He received treatment for pneumonia over the weekend. The Nobel Peace Prize winner has become increasingly frail over the years and has not appeared in public since South Africa hosted the World Cup in 2010.


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