Response to literature
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Response to Literature. There is a MAJOR difference between a book report and a response to literature. Book report = summarize Response to literature = analyze . There IS a difference… Definitions from http://dictionary.reference.com.

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Response to Literature

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Response to literature

Response to Literature

  • There is a MAJOR difference between a book report and a response to literature.

  • Book report = summarize

  • Response to literature = analyze


There is a difference definitions from http dictionary reference com

There IS a difference…Definitions from http://dictionary.reference.com

Summarize = to present briefly; state or express in a concise form

Analyze = to examine critically, so as to bring out the essential elements; to examine carefully and in detail


Your task when writing a response to literature

Your task when writing a response to literature:

  • Present an argument about a literary aspect of the text

  • Provide specific examples to prove to your reader that your argument is credible and solid


Step 1 introduction

Step 1: Introduction

  • Attention getter – Get your reader’s attention with one of the following methods:

    • Rhetorical question

    • Relevant quote from the story

    • Relevant quote from an outside source


Step 1 introduction1

Step 1: Introduction

  • Necessary information:

    • Author’s name

    • Title of work (book titles should be underlined, short stories, plays and poems go in quotation marks)

    • Brief, very brief, summary of plot that leads up to your thesis – Only summarize information that will be needed for the remainder of the paper


Step 1 introduction2

STEP 1: INTRODUCTION

  • Thesis – The argument of the paper that will be supported in the body through specific examples from the literature


Examples of poor thesis statements

Examples of poor thesis statements:

  • Very weak, no focus, leads to a summary: Arthur Miller’s “The Crucible” is a great play.

  • Better, but still lacking analysis: In “The Crucible,” Arthur Miller tells about the Salem Witch Trials.


Example of a strong thesis statement

Example of a strong thesis statement:

  • It is better to fail with honor than succeed as a fraud is the theme in The Crucible by Arthur Miller because John Proctor proves his honor by dying for a lie, admitting to his affair with Abigail, and continuing to stay true to Elizabeth Proctor.

  • Thesis statements must include:

    • A literary element you are arguing

    • Author/Text

    • The proof (the main reasons why the literary element you are arguing exists)


Step 2 body

Step 2: Body

  • Construct body paragraphs that have a consistent topic and strive to support your thesis

  • Present specific quotes and examples from the text to help explain your argument


Step 2 body1

Step 2: Body

A formula to consider…

  • Topic sentence

  • Introduce quote/support from literature

  • Quote/support

  • Analyze the quote/support


Quotes

Quotes

“Quoting involves taking a word, phrase, or passage directly from the story, novel, or essay and working it grammatically into your discussion.” (OWL at Purdue)

Example: When John Proctor says, “God is dead,” he means that everything within the proceedings is false pretences (Miller 10).


Quotes1

Quotes

  • Notice the citation at the end of the following example:

    Example: When John Proctor says, “God is dead,” he means that everything within the proceedings is false pretences (Miller 10).

  • Your paper MUST include page citations! Failure to use these citations will result in a failing grade.


Step 3 conclusion

Step 3: Conclusion

Respect the 4 Rs…

  • Review, or briefly summarize, your main points. This should only take 1-2 sentences.

    2. Restate your thesis. Restate, not rewrite, the original point you were trying to make.


Step 3 conclusion1

Step 3: Conclusion

3.Relate all of your sentences back to your original thesis.

4.Round offyour paper with a clincher. Your last sentence should be strong and powerful. This is the final chance you have to convince your reader of your idea.


Final thoughts

Final thoughts:

  • You are providing an analysis, not a summary. However, you still need accuracy when discussing the plot.

  • Poor grammar/spelling attacks your credibility with your reader.

  • Formal papers of this nature require a 3rd person point-of-view (No “I”) unless you are in the This I Believe section.

  • Must be written in present tense.


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