Ethnic Minority Children and Youth  Facing Traumatic Stress: Promoting Resiliency and Coping Strategies

Ethnic Minority Children and Youth Facing Traumatic Stress: Promoting Resiliency and Coping Strategies PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Trauma Affects Children's . . .. Brain development and healthEmotional regulationRelationshipsAbility to learn. Poverty and Trauma. Poverty is associated with more serious problems for children Poverty-Related Environmental Stressors: Family InstabilityMaternal DepressionLess Access to ResourcesHealth DisparitiesSub-Standard SchoolsDangerous Neighborhoods.

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Ethnic Minority Children and Youth Facing Traumatic Stress: Promoting Resiliency and Coping Strategies

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1. Ethnic Minority Children and Youth Facing Traumatic Stress: Promoting Resiliency and Coping Strategies Alicia F. Lieberman, Ph.D. Director, Early Trauma Treatment Network University of California San Francisco [email protected]

2. Thank Joy: Acknowledge her passion and commitment In a nation that easily forgets events beyond the next news cycle We must remember that nearly half a million children under 5 lived in communities destroyed by Hurricane Katrina. An estimated 100,000 of those children could suffer some psychological trauma. We cannot forget the look of terror, trauma and loss in the eyes of these young children. Thank Joy: Acknowledge her passion and commitment In a nation that easily forgets events beyond the next news cycle We must remember that nearly half a million children under 5 lived in communities destroyed by Hurricane Katrina. An estimated 100,000 of those children could suffer some psychological trauma. We cannot forget the look of terror, trauma and loss in the eyes of these young children.

3. Trauma Affects Children’s . . . Brain development and health Emotional regulation Relationships Ability to learn

4. Poverty and Trauma Poverty is associated with more serious problems for children Poverty-Related Environmental Stressors: Family Instability Maternal Depression Less Access to Resources Health Disparities Sub-Standard Schools Dangerous Neighborhoods

5. Trauma, Poverty and Minority Status Minority children are more likely to be poor Traumatic events cluster when there is poverty The impact of traumatic events is cumulative Minority children are more vulnerable to a traumatic event due to combined effect of earlier trauma, poverty-related stressors, and less access to resources

6. “We’ve lived Katrina. This is one more Katrina in a series of Katrinas.” (Survivor of Hurricane Katrina, as quoted by Dr. Russell T. Jones)

7. Beyond Natural Disasters, the Trauma of Daily Life…….

8. What is the Most Frequent Cause of Child Traumatic Stress? Violence is the most frequent form of trauma Violence compounds the impact of other kinds of trauma Minority children are over-represented in: Domestic Violence Victims of Crime Child Abuse Witnesses of Community Violence

9. What are the Long-Term Effects of Child Trauma? Physical Illness Mental Illness School Failure Aggression Substance Abuse Criminal Behavior

11. What We Can Do: Apply Scientific Knowledge Effective Interventions Exist Evidence-Based Practices – What they have in common: Safe human relationships Predictable routines Support for parental involvement Trauma narrative: working with the child’s own story Setting age-appropriate goals

12. What We Can Do: Enhance Cultural Competence Make treatment real! Science is essential but not sufficient Community buy-in is crucial for success Include families/consumers from all cultures in all levels of trauma response Planning Intervention/Implementation Evaluation Follow up

13. What We Can Do: Improve Public Policy Adopt policies that address the educational and health disparities of minority children and their families Ensure adequate funding for agencies and programs that address health, childcare, education, family support, and child welfare Provide emergency funding and allow flexible policies for federal and state agencies dealing with disasters

14. What We Can Do: Begin at the Beginning Babies can’t wait! Children from birth to age 5 are particularly vulnerable: 85% of child abuse victims majority of child abuse fatalities most frequent witnesses of domestic violence A half-million children under the age of 5 lived in communities destroyed by Hurricane Katrina

15. “I have a hole in my roof, but I have a bigger hole in my heart because no one is looking out for the kids.” (Teacher who lost her house during Hurricane Katrina, as quoted by Dr. Russell T. Jones)

17. Contact Information Alicia F. Lieberman, Ph.D. Director, Early Trauma Treatment Network University of California San Francisco [email protected] National Child Traumatic Stress Network www.nctsn.org

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