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Group 2: Evolution. Fordham University: Rose Carlson Evon Hekkala Gerard Iwantsch Yale University: Tiffany Tsang Andy Phillips. Facilitators: Marvin O’Neal III and Carl Hashimoto. Evolution teaching tidbit.

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Group 2: Evolution

Fordham University:

Rose Carlson

Evon Hekkala

Gerard Iwantsch

Yale University:

Tiffany Tsang

Andy Phillips

Facilitators: Marvin O’Neal III and Carl Hashimoto


Framework of teachable unit evidence for evolution

Evolution teaching tidbit

Who? How many?Introductory biology for majors (freshmen). 60-75 students.

Background?

Co-requisites of chemistry and calculus.

Some understanding/knowledge of nomenclature from high school biology (expected to vary among students).

1

1

Framework of Teachable Unit (Evidence for evolution)

2

2

3

1-2 hours of class time

Core Terminologies, Concepts, History

Teaching Tidbit

Concluding Remarks


Framework

Learning Goals for the teaching unit :

In this unit, students will:

  • Understand that variation exists within a population.

  • Understand the concept of selection.

  • Understand that organisms evolve over multiple generations (i.e. time).

  • Be able to evaluate evidence for evolution.

  • Dispel the misconception that individuals evolve.


GOAL: Understand that natural selection acts on existing variation in a population.

Learning Objectives:

1. Be able to construct a concept map using the terms evolution, variation, time, selection, and reproduction.

2. Be able to identify and then describe the steps that one would take to domesticate a wild species.


Do Individuals Evolve?

Use your clickers to choose one answer:

A = Yes B = No


The idea that an individual changes in response to natural selection is a common misconception in evolutionary biology.

stretches its neck and passes this change on to its offspring

long-necked individuals

lots of time

short-necked individual

Lamarck


The idea that an individual changes in response to natural selection is a common misconception in evolutionary biology.

stretches its neck and passes this change on to its offspring

long-necked individuals

lots of time

short-necked individual

Lamarck

descendent population with, on average, longer necks

lots of time

natural selection favors longer necks

original population showing variation in neck length

Darwin


How did we get a Maltese from a wolf?

Trivial Pursuit factoid: this only took about 15000 years…


Artificial selection

intentional breeding (by humans) of animals or plants for certain traits.



Artificial selection: Brassica to broccoli.


Activity (5 minutes)

  • Construct a concept map with a partner using the following terms: time, evolution, reproduction, variation, and selection.

Remember how to draw a concept map?


One possible concept map…

selection

on

variation

+/-

time

reproduction

evolution/

Δ variation


Domestication

  • a process by which a population of organisms

  • becomes

  • adapted to the captive environment,

  • occurring over generations

artificial selection is the selective force in domestication


Which of these images is an example of domestication? (Use your clickers to select one answer).

A.

B.

C.

D.


From wild foxes to domesticated foxes

in 30 generations flat!

  • Describe how the Russian scientists domesticated the foxes.

THINK (for 1 minute)


From wild foxes to domesticated foxes

in 30 generations flat!

  • Describe how the Russian scientists domesticated the foxes.

THINK (for 1 minute)

PAIR, and SHARE


REVIEW: the key elements required for domestication.

  • A population with existing (heritable) variation

  • A human-induced selective force

  • Multiple generations (i.e. time)


Natural vs. artificial selection

  • The two types of selection are similar.

  • However, artificial selection works much more quickly because the selective forces are stronger and the changes tend to be directional


Homework:Based on today’s material, think about which features of a species might make it easier or more difficult to domesticate.


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