English 1 end of course study guide
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 9

English 1 : End of Course Study Guide PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 72 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

English 1 : End of Course Study Guide. Types of Literature Narrative fiction 8. Essay Narrative Poetry 9. Novel Mythology 10. Short story Epic 11. Dramatic Poetry Lyric Poetry Drama Nonfiction: Argumentative Essay

Download Presentation

English 1 : End of Course Study Guide

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


English 1 end of course study guide

English 1 : End of Course Study Guide

Types of Literature

Narrative fiction 8. Essay

Narrative Poetry 9. Novel

Mythology 10. Short story

Epic 11. Dramatic Poetry

Lyric Poetry

Drama

Nonfiction:

Argumentative Essay

Descriptive Essay

Expository Essay

Narrative Essay

Biography

Autobiography


Elements of literature eoc pg 2

Elements of Literature –EOC pg 2

  • Plot

  • Conflict

  • Climax

  • Protagonist

  • Antagonist

  • Secondary Characters

  • Setting

  • Theme

  • Point-of –View

  • Mood

  • Tone

  • Characterization

  • Subplot


Literature terms and techniques eoc study guide page 3

Literature Terms and Techniques-EOC Study Guide, page 3

  • Simile

  • Metaphor

  • Personification

  • Hyperbole

  • Rhythm

  • Assonance

  • Alliteration

  • Prose

  • Dialogue

  • Stage directions

  • Tragedy

  • Comedy

  • Dramatic Irony

  • Foreshadowing

  • Onomatopoeia

  • Rhyme


Literature terms eoc study guide page 4

Literature Terms-EOC study guide, page 4

17.Imagery 34. Epithet

  • Stanza 35. Blank Verse

  • Repetition 36. Dramatic Foil

  • Sonnet 37. Monologue

  • Ballad 38. Flashback

  • Free Verse 39. Aside

  • Denotation 40. Prologue

  • Connotative 41. Tragic Flaw

  • Literal 42. Main Idea

  • Irony 43. Details

  • Symbol 44. Comparison

  • Archetype 45. Contrast

  • Homeric Simile 46. Situational Irony

  • Figurative Language 47. Characters

  • Epic Hero a. flat

  • Epic Couplet b. round

  • Couplet c. static

    d. dynamic


Eoc study guide page 5

EOC Study Guide, page 5

48.Allusion 65. Pun

49. Satire 66. Fact / opinion

50. Historical Fiction 67. Propaganda

51. General / specific 68. Optimistic

52. Point / counterpoint 69. Pessimistic

53. Bias 70. Soliloquy

54. Extended Metaphor 71. Diction

55. Parody 72. Memoirs

56. Oxymoron 73. Rhyme Scheme

57. Stereotype 74. Foil

58. Inference

59. Complication

60. Cause

61. Effect

62. Simplistic vs./ complex

63. Conservative vs./ creative

64. caricature


Eoc study guide page 6

EOC Study Guide, page 6

Recognize and Recall

  • Recognize Main Idea

  • Recognize major details

  • Identify sequence of selection

  • Recognize comparison

  • Recognize contrast

  • Characterization

  • Draw logical inferences and conclusions from a selection

    Edit for grammar and language conventions

  • Edit for complete sentences

  • Edit for correct capitalization

  • Edit for correct punctuation (:) (,) (;) (‘’)

  • Edit for correct spelling

  • Edit for Word Usage

  • Edit for proper format sequence of a passage or passages


Eoc study guide page 7

EOC Study Guide, page 7

Punctuation

Colons:

  • Use to introduce a list (statement must be concluded then write the list). Ex. Noted American aviators include these: Wiley Post, Charles Lindbergh, and Amelia Earhart.

  • Use a colon before a formal quotation. Ex. Winston Churchill said this about public speaking: “If you have an important point to make, don’t try to be subtle or clever…..”

  • Use a colon in time, (1:25); verse, (Job 6: 1-8); Business letter, (Sir: or Madam:).

    Semicolon;

  • Use to separate two main clauses (sentences) that do not use a conjunction.

    Ex. She can’t play the drums; I know she would like to learn.


Eoc study guide page 8

EOC Study Guide, page 8

  • Use a semicolon when you have a list of things using commas. . Ex. Hawaiian words familiar to many mainlanders include luau, which means “feast”; aloha, which can mean “love,” “welcome,” or “farewell”; and hula, which means “dance”.

    3.Use to separate two main clauses joined by a coordinating conjunction (but, so, for, and) when such clauses already contain several commas. Ex. Travel ads often focus on Oahu’s attractions, such as Waikiki Beach, Pearl Harbor, and Diamond Head; but the state has many other interesting sites.

    4. Use a semicolon to separate main clauses joined by a conjunctive adverb or by an expression such as for example or that is. Ex. There are 132 Hawaiian island; however, nearly all residents live on seven of the islands.


Eoc study guide page 9

EOC Study Guide, page 9

Commas:

  • Use between two main clauses with a conjunction: but, and, so, for, nor, yet. Ex. I recognize her, but I can’t think of her name.

    2.Use commas to separate a series of things.

    Ex. drinks, cups, and ice. Ex. Ayala is a member of the Debaters’ Club, the Glee Club, and the swimming team.

  • --Use to separate extra word. Ex. Waving, the flag showed her colors. Ex. My brother, Bob, came home yesterday.

    --After a prepositional phrase. Ex. During the final minutes of the game, the crowd cheered wildly.

  • Comma in titles, (Name, M.D.); addresses, (Lumberton, NC); and numbers, (May 20, 2006).

  • Use between coordinate modifiers. Ex. She is a smart, athletic student.

    6.Underline big things (ex: magazines, Time) and “ ” (ex: articles in a magazine “Our Schools Today”).


  • Login