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Developing Fluent Readers and Writers with Word Study Instruction in Phonics and Fluency. EDC 424. Connecting Your Readings. Reading Guide #2 Tompkins : What & why to teach word patterns for fluency development (and how to assess it)

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developing fluent readers and writers with word study instruction in phonics and fluency

Developing Fluent Readers and Writers with Word Study Instruction in Phonics and Fluency

EDC 424

connecting your readings
Connecting Your Readings
  • Reading Guide #2
  • Tompkins: What & why to teach word patterns for fluency development (and how to assess it)
  • Words Their Way: What and how to teach word patterns for spelling and reading development (and how to assess it)
phonics fluency
Phonics Fluency
  • Word Recognition (Automaticity)
    • Sight words
    • High frequency words
  • Word Identification Strategies
    • Decodable words
  • Fluency (ASP)
    • Accuracy
    • Speed
    • Prosody
  • Apply strategies using knowledge of …
    • 1. Phonics 2. Word families
    • 3. Syllables 4. Root words & affixes
four word identification strategies
Four Word Identification Strategies
  • Using (integrated) knowledge of
    • Phonics (sound-symbol correspondence)
    • Word families (onset & rime, then substitute onset)
    • Syllables (CVC, CV, open vs. closed patterns)
    • Root words and affixes (morphemes = meaning)
fluency instruction word recognition
Fluency Instruction: Word Recognition
  • How do you teachautomatic word recognition?
    • Introduce words in context
    • Chant and clap words
    • Practice reading and writing words together
    • Have children read and write words
  • How do you assessautomatic word recognition?
    • High frequency word lists
    • Observation Survey: word reading and writing vocabulary subtests
    • Authentic writing samples

WORD STUDY

fluency instruction word identification
Fluency Instruction: Word Identification
  • How do you teachstrategicword identification?
    • Teach letter sequences & phonics patterns
    • Teach onset & rime – link reading and writing
    • Teach syllable patterns;
    • Teach meanings of Greek & Latin roots, prefix, & suffixes
  • How do you assessstrategic word identification?
    • Developmental Reading Assessment [DRA] (leveled books and running records)
    • Names Test (phonics) -- Running Records
    • PALS: Words in Isolation Word List

WORD STUDY

developmental reading assessment dra
Developmental Reading Assessment (DRA)

Benchmark Assessment Books

sight word walls grade k 1
Sight Word Walls (Grade K-1)

Make reachable

and interactive

themed word walls grades k 6
Themed Word Walls Grades K-6

For reading, writing,

and content-area

vocabulary

slide12

Themed Word Walls Grades K-6

For reading, writing,

and content-area

vocabulary

wtw organizing for word study
WTW: Organizing for Word Study
  • How are word sorts different than other phonics programs?
    • Hands-on manipulatives to learn by doing
    • Work from known to unknown to help spell
    • Analytic (whole > part) rather than synthetic (part > whole)
    • Critical thinking about principles (compare/contrast) rather than memorizing rules
    • Efficient (more words) and cost effective (reusable cards vs. worksheets with fewer words
    • Easier to differentiate instruction and adapt (just combine different word groups and cards)
three main types of word sorts
Three Main Types of Word Sorts

Correct sequence

2

1

  • Sound Sort > Visual Pattern Sort > Meaning Sort

Picture sort (early stages)

Use keyword headings (either picture or visual pattern)

Concept sort (themed words or vocabulary

Word sort

(see sound vs. spelling)

Spelling/meaning sort

(homophones; homographs; affix/suffix sorts)

Blind sort sort by sound without

visual cues

try it out word sorts
Try it out: Word Sorts
  • First, sort by SOUND of G. I will model this.

Soft G

badge

Hard G

bag

cage

twig

slug

edge

lodge

drug

page

flag

huge

judge

leg

stage

try it out word sorts1
Try it out: Word Sorts
  • First, sort by SOUND of G. I will model this.

Soft G

badge

Hard G

bag

cage

drug

edge

flag

huge

leg

judge

slug

lodge

twig

page

stage

try it out word sorts2
Try it out: Word Sorts
  • Now, sort by [visual] pattern. Work with a partner to discover the different patterns & reflect (compare & declare) - HINT (there are more than two groups)

cage

drug

edge

flag

huge

leg

judge

slug

lodge

twig

page

stage

try it out word sorts3
Try it out: Word Sorts
  • Now, sort by [visual] pattern. Work with a partner to discover the different patterns & reflect (compare & declare)

g

dge

ge

slug

badge

cage

bag

judge

page

drug

lodge

huge

flag

edge

stage

leg

soft g at end has a silent e

when short vowel = dge

when long vowel = ge

twig

short vowel =

hard g and no “e”

how teach practice word sorts
How teach/practice word sorts?
  • Teacher directed closed sort (Hard/Soft G)
    • Teacher defines categories and models the sort; refer to keyword headings each time and gradually release responsibility to the reader
  • Student directed open sort (Spelling pattern)
    • Students create own categories of words and explain why sorted that way
    • Interesting for diagnostic and assessment purposes
teacher directed word study lessons
Teacher-Directed Word Study Lessons
  • Demonstrate: Tell words and model with hard words (no guessing games)
  • Sort & check: Don’t correct errors for students; they check by reading themselves (can have check sheet to help monitoring)
  • Reflect: Have students compare and declare the patterns they notice
  • Extend: revisit during week in centers, with partner, seatwork, homework, with parents, etc.
  • Making Sorts Harder or Easier: increase/decrease number of contrasts, vocabulary, or types of words
  • Add Oddball Sorts: includeexceptions (sight words or just don’t fit the rule) within the set of words to sort
variations on word sorts refer to the list in your reading guide
Variations on Word SortsRefer to the list in your Reading Guide
  • Which is especially useful for emergent/early readers?
  • Which might work best with controlled texts at first?
  • Which two might foster reading fluency?
  • Which two might give practice generating new words that fit that group?
  • Which provides explicit links to writing?
tips for preparing word sorts
Tips for Preparing Word Sorts
  • Decide on developmentally appropriate features and common error patterns
  • Contrast at least two groups – later exceptions or even three groups
  • Start with easy contrasts > then harder ones
  • Cull words from multiple spelling lists to provide contrasts (rather than all same pattern)
word study in action
Word Study In Action
  • Let’s see some examples.
  • Noticing/Improving Word Study Teaching Techniques
    • What do you notice?
    • What would you do to improve?
    • How would you create a word sort around this principal that’s differentiated by ability/grade level?
word study in action1
Word Study In Action
  • Work in groups of four to develop a grade-appropriate word study list and task that focuses on Adding Inflected endings “ed”
  • Grade 2: 2 categories (double/not)
  • Grade 3A: 3 categories: VC/CVVC/VCC
  • Grade 3B: 4 categories: VC/CVVC/VCC/edrop
  • Grade 4: 3 categories (double/not/irregular)
  • Grade 5: 3 categories and 2 syllable words (double/not double/e-drop)
materials and space considerations for word sorts brainstorm with a partner
Materials and Space Considerations for Word Sorts Brainstorm with a partner
  • Pocket Charts for peer interactive practice
  • Handouts / Worksheets for cutting, gluing, writing
  • Whiteboards for independent practice
  • Laminated classification folders
  • Labeled envelopes or baggies for storage (can self check with answers on back if desired)
  • Word study journals in box near word study center
  • Game boards and pieces to extend practice
  • Stopwatch for speed sorts
key resources can be found in the appendix to words their way
Key resources can be found in the Appendix to Words Their Way
  • Appendix B: Soundboards for sorting labels
  • Appendix C: Pictures for Sorts & Games (consonants, short vowels, long vowels)
  • Appendix D: Sample word sorts by spelling stage (important for grade level lesson plans)
  • Appendix E: Sight Words and Patterned Words for Word Sorts (including homophones, compound words, open and closed syllables, prefixes/suffixes, roots)
  • Appendix F: Games and Templates for Sorts
making words a e g m n s t
Making Words (a, e, g, m, n, s, t)
  • Use 3 letters to spell net.
  • Change the first letter in net to spell met.
  • Change the first letter again to spell set.
  • Add a letter you can’t hear to set to spell seat.
  • Change the first letter in seat to spell neat.
  • Change the first letter again to spell meat.
  • Use the same letters in meat but move them around so they spell team.
  • Use 4 letters to spell east.
  • Clear your holders and start over to spell another 4 letter word: stem.
  • Use a letter you can’t hear to turn stem into steam.
  • I have just one word left you can make with all your letters.
homework and reminders
Homework and Reminders
  • Tompkins Chapter 2 (p. 38-52) Teaching Reading (to prepare for understanding the lesson plan assignment that we’ll cover next class) Pre-Reading, Reading, Responding, Exploring, and Applying
  • Tompkins, Ch. 4 and assorted pages (Guided Reading Instruction)
  • Work on Literacy Photo Journal
    • I will post some examples and a template on the wiki to help you get started – we’ll do more next week
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