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von Frau Pody. Die Wochentage. Montag. Reference to the moon and moon cycle with its 12 phases. Hence: „Monat“ = „month“. Each one of these phases is subdivided into four parts, each one starting with a „Montag“ First mentioned in 11 th century as „manotag“. Dienstag.

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Von frau pody

von Frau Pody

Die Wochentage


Montag
Montag

  • Reference to the moon and moon cycle with its 12 phases. Hence: „Monat“ = „month“.

  • Each one of these phases is subdivided into four parts, each one starting with a „Montag“

  • First mentioned in 11 th century as „manotag“.


Dienstag
Dienstag

  • In written language in this form since 17th century only.

  • Believed to be related to German god of the sky and of war, Tiwaz (or Pingsaz)

  • (Variables are Zyr, Zis, T´yr).

  • Original name was tiwas-dagaz.


Mittwoch
Mittwoch

  • pragmatic name for mid-week

  • originally named after god Wotan (Odin), hence English Wednesday, schwed. onsdag

  • Middle of work week (Monday –Friday)


Donnerstag
Donnerstag

  • refers to German weather god Donar / Thor, replacing Roman god Iupiter.


Freitag
Freitag

  • named after goddess Freya (or Fria, Frigg), wife of Wotan (Odin)

  • reminds of Roman goddess Venus

  • goddess of love and war


Samstag sonnabend
Samstag / Sonnabend

  • 1. Samstag

  • from Jewish Sabbath

  • 2. Sonnabend

  • In Northern Germany and Central eastern Germany „Sunday eve“

  • first mentioned as sunnunaband (9th century)


Sonntag
Sonntag

  • reference to the „sun“


International
International

Blue Greek, Roman, and German mythology

Yellow pragmatic

Red Roman

Green Jewish

Gray Christian


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