Physical Activity at Home Section 2 : Module 6

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Physical Activity at Home Section 2 : Module 6

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1. 1 Physical Activity at Home Section 2 : Module 6

2. 2 Percentage of Overweight U.S. Children and Adolescents is Soaring* The number of overweight children in the United States is higher than ever before. More than 16 percent of children aged 6 to 19 are overweight, a rate that has doubled since 1980. Overweight is defined as body mass index (BMI) at or above the sex- and age-specific 95th percentile of the 2000 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention BMI cutoff points. Source: Data for 1976-1994: National Center for Health Statistics. (2003). Health United States, 2003 with Chartbook on Trends in the Health of Americans . National Center for Health Statistics. 2003. Table 69. Data for 1999-2002 from Hedley, Allison, Ogden, Cynthia, Johnson, Clifford, Carroll, Margaret, Curtin, Lester and Katherine Flegal. "Prevalence of Overweight and Obesity Among US Children, Adolescents, and Adults, 1999-2002," JAMA , 291 (23): 2847-2850. Data for 2003-2004: Ogden, Cynthia, Carroll, Margaret, Curtin, Lester, McDowell, Margaret, Tabak, Carolyn, and Flegal, Katherine. "Prevalence of Overweight and Obesity in the United States, 1999- 2004." JAMA, 295 (13): 1549-1555. The number of overweight children in the United States is higher than ever before. More than 16 percent of children aged 6 to 19 are overweight, a rate that has doubled since 1980. Overweight is defined as body mass index (BMI) at or above the sex- and age-specific 95th percentile of the 2000 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention BMI cutoff points. Source: Data for 1976-1994: National Center for Health Statistics. (2003). Health United States, 2003 with Chartbook on Trends in the Health of Americans . National Center for Health Statistics. 2003. Table 69. Data for 1999-2002 from Hedley, Allison, Ogden, Cynthia, Johnson, Clifford, Carroll, Margaret, Curtin, Lester and Katherine Flegal. "Prevalence of Overweight and Obesity Among US Children, Adolescents, and Adults, 1999-2002," JAMA , 291 (23): 2847-2850. Data for 2003-2004: Ogden, Cynthia, Carroll, Margaret, Curtin, Lester, McDowell, Margaret, Tabak, Carolyn, and Flegal, Katherine. "Prevalence of Overweight and Obesity in the United States, 1999- 2004." JAMA, 295 (13): 1549-1555.

3. 3 Physical Activity Recommendations for Youth At least 60 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity most days of the week, preferably daily.1 Note: This recommendation is for overall health. Increasing physical activity alone will probably not result in significant weight loss. Also, more physical activity time may be needed to achieve full motor development. The Centers for Disease Control recommends that all children participate in at least 60 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity most days of the week to maintain good health. However, if your child is overweight or at-risk for overweight, increasing physical activity alone may not produce significant weight loss. Increased activity along with improved nutrition over a period of months will be necessary for noticeable changes in body fat.The Centers for Disease Control recommends that all children participate in at least 60 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity most days of the week to maintain good health. However, if your child is overweight or at-risk for overweight, increasing physical activity alone may not produce significant weight loss. Increased activity along with improved nutrition over a period of months will be necessary for noticeable changes in body fat.

4. 4 Structured vs. Unstructured The National Association of Sports and Physical Education recommends that every day preschoolers should: Get at least 60 minutes of structured physical activity (adult-led activity) Get at least 60 minutes of unstructured physical activity (free play) Not be inactive for more than 1 hour at a time (unless sleeping) All children need both planned activity and free play. The National Association of Sports and Physical Education (NASPE) recommends that preschool children should get at least one hour of structured AND unstructured physical activity each day. In addition, children should not remain inactive for more than an hour at a time. The only time kids should be not moving for more than an hour straight is when they are sleeping!All children need both planned activity and free play. The National Association of Sports and Physical Education (NASPE) recommends that preschool children should get at least one hour of structured AND unstructured physical activity each day. In addition, children should not remain inactive for more than an hour at a time. The only time kids should be not moving for more than an hour straight is when they are sleeping!

5. 5 What Counts? Physical activity is just moving - everything counts! Moderate physical activity gets your heart beating faster Vigorous activity makes you sweat Physical activity doesn’t just mean running and push-ups…. Physical activity is any bodily movement produced by muscles that burns energy. So…any kind of moving counts as physical activity! Physical activity doesn’t just mean exercises like jogging or push-ups….in reality, many things that kids consider “having fun” are physical activities - swimming, playing tag, or riding a bike, for instance. Moderate intensity physical activities are those that get your heart beating fast. Things like walking, bike riding, or mowing the lawn are examples of moderate physical activity. Vigorous physical activities are things that really make you sweat. Running, aerobics, or shoveling snow might fall into this category. Physical activity is any bodily movement produced by muscles that burns energy. So…any kind of moving counts as physical activity! Physical activity doesn’t just mean exercises like jogging or push-ups….in reality, many things that kids consider “having fun” are physical activities - swimming, playing tag, or riding a bike, for instance. Moderate intensity physical activities are those that get your heart beating fast. Things like walking, bike riding, or mowing the lawn are examples of moderate physical activity. Vigorous physical activities are things that really make you sweat. Running, aerobics, or shoveling snow might fall into this category.

6. 6 Structured Physical Activity Structured physical activities are things like: Organized sports teams Planned exercises Other adult-led games/clubs Structured activity is when you make a specific time to be active, and plan certain kinds of things to do during that time. Teaching your child how to move in all kinds of ways will help them enjoy physical activity. To make sure your child is exposed to all kinds of movement you may want to plan specific physical activities to help them . Young children should learn to jump, hop, skip, kick, and throw. Take a few minutes out of each day to help your young one practice these activities. Sports teams led by a coach are another example of structured physical activity. Wait until children are 6 years old before beginning organized sports. In early childhood, children are too young to understand rules and strategies and to handle the emotional and social stress sometimes associated with organized sports. It is important to foster a love for movement in early childhood. Forcing kids to participate in sporting events with “winners” and “losers” may give kids a bad experience and keep them from doing that activity later in life. Other structured activities include exercise classes and activity-based clubs like gymnastics or jump rope teams. These activities with no “winners” or “losers” let kids enjoy physical activity without having to compete. Structured activity is when you make a specific time to be active, and plan certain kinds of things to do during that time. Teaching your child how to move in all kinds of ways will help them enjoy physical activity. To make sure your child is exposed to all kinds of movement you may want to plan specific physical activities to help them . Young children should learn to jump, hop, skip, kick, and throw. Take a few minutes out of each day to help your young one practice these activities. Sports teams led by a coach are another example of structured physical activity. Wait until children are 6 years old before beginning organized sports. In early childhood, children are too young to understand rules and strategies and to handle the emotional and social stress sometimes associated with organized sports. It is important to foster a love for movement in early childhood. Forcing kids to participate in sporting events with “winners” and “losers” may give kids a bad experience and keep them from doing that activity later in life. Other structured activities include exercise classes and activity-based clubs like gymnastics or jump rope teams. These activities with no “winners” or “losers” let kids enjoy physical activity without having to compete.

7. 7 Unstructured Physical Activity Playing outside with friends Walking/hiking in the woods Inventing a new game Recess While structured physical activity is valuable, it is important for children to have time to play. Free play helps develop a child's imagination, creativity, body awareness and sense of space and dimension. Children learn about the world by moving around in it and exploring it’s wonder! Find a safe place near your home where your child can play with friends or siblings. If the weather is bad, provide soft objects like balls and bean bags for your child to play with indoors.While structured physical activity is valuable, it is important for children to have time to play. Free play helps develop a child's imagination, creativity, body awareness and sense of space and dimension. Children learn about the world by moving around in it and exploring it’s wonder! Find a safe place near your home where your child can play with friends or siblings. If the weather is bad, provide soft objects like balls and bean bags for your child to play with indoors.

8. 8 Activate Your Family! Encourage kids to do things they enjoy like: Playing outdoors Throwing a football or frisbee Playing hide and seek Playing with the dog The trick to increasing physical activity is to find things to do that are fun…when kids (and parents for that matter) are having fun, they forget about how hard they are working – because it isn’t work, it’s play! Kids naturally love to move. As a parent you know how hard it is to get them to sit still! Use this love of movement to their advantage by encouraging your children to play. Organized sports are great for older kids (over age 8?), but they also need time to run and play with siblings or neighborhood children in an unorganized setting. The trick to increasing physical activity is to find things to do that are fun…when kids (and parents for that matter) are having fun, they forget about how hard they are working – because it isn’t work, it’s play! Kids naturally love to move. As a parent you know how hard it is to get them to sit still! Use this love of movement to their advantage by encouraging your children to play. Organized sports are great for older kids (over age 8?), but they also need time to run and play with siblings or neighborhood children in an unorganized setting.

9. 9 Make it a Family Affair! If you do it your kids will too! Use physical activity to strengthen family bonds…as well as muscles! Pass down important cultural traditions Be a role model Everyone needs physical activity to be healthy. When families are active together everyone benefits! Kids get to burn off their excess energy and parents enjoy the many health benefits of physical activity. As a parent, you are the role-model for your children….if they see you participate in regular physical activities they will be more likely to participate on their own as they get older. Plus, the extra time spent as a family unit helps build relationships and strong family bonds as well as pass down cultural values.Everyone needs physical activity to be healthy. When families are active together everyone benefits! Kids get to burn off their excess energy and parents enjoy the many health benefits of physical activity. As a parent, you are the role-model for your children….if they see you participate in regular physical activities they will be more likely to participate on their own as they get older. Plus, the extra time spent as a family unit helps build relationships and strong family bonds as well as pass down cultural values.

10. 10 Family Physical Activities Hiking Berry Picking Beach Combing Exploring nature Some of the best family physical activities are right outside your front door! Make use of Alaska’s wonderful outdoor opportunities by doing active things like hiking, berry picking, or beach combing. Some of the best family physical activities are right outside your front door! Make use of Alaska’s wonderful outdoor opportunities by doing active things like hiking, berry picking, or beach combing.

11. 11 If it is Cold Outside…. Go sledding! Ice skate Make snow angels Build a snow man We all know that Alaskan winters can be very cold, but don’t let that ruin your family fun! Kids love to be outside when there is snow on the ground, and often don’t even notice the chill in the air. Use snowy winter days to do physical activities like sledding, skiing, skating, and snowman building. All of these activities are fun and are good energy burners….the whole family will be doing healthy physical activity without even knowing it!We all know that Alaskan winters can be very cold, but don’t let that ruin your family fun! Kids love to be outside when there is snow on the ground, and often don’t even notice the chill in the air. Use snowy winter days to do physical activities like sledding, skiing, skating, and snowman building. All of these activities are fun and are good energy burners….the whole family will be doing healthy physical activity without even knowing it!

12. 12 Indoor Fun Play indoor “Socker” Put on some music and dance! Play treasure hunt by hiding "treasures" throughout the classroom and provide clues of where they might be. Make an obstacle course with chairs, boxes, and tours for the kids to go over, under, through, and around. When the weather is just too cold or wet and you are forced in doors, find creative ways to keep kids moving. One way to do that is to adapt typical outdoor sports so they can be played indoors. For instance, you could play a game of “Socker” using a rolled-up sock as a ball and living room walls as goals! Other fun indoor activities include having a treasure hunt, obstacle course, sit-up/push-up contests, arm wrestling contests, or pretend “ice skating” with sock feet on a linoleum floor. Another fun idea is to play music and create a new dance!When the weather is just too cold or wet and you are forced in doors, find creative ways to keep kids moving. One way to do that is to adapt typical outdoor sports so they can be played indoors. For instance, you could play a game of “Socker” using a rolled-up sock as a ball and living room walls as goals! Other fun indoor activities include having a treasure hunt, obstacle course, sit-up/push-up contests, arm wrestling contests, or pretend “ice skating” with sock feet on a linoleum floor. Another fun idea is to play music and create a new dance!

13. 13 Sample Activity – Hold That Tiger! Children love animals and they love to imitate. Combine these two interests to inspire exercise. What you'll need: Magazines or newspapers Cardboard or paper Paste or glue Scissors An open space in which to move What to do: Collect pictures of different animals. Paste each picture on a different piece of cardboard. Place the cards face down on a table and mix them up. Have your child select a card and turn the card over to reveal the animal picture on the other side. Have your child imitate the movements of the animal on the card. For example: rabbit: hop horse: gallop turtle: crawl elephant: slow lumbering walk, clasp hands together and swing arms side to side like a trunk. frog : leap tiger: fluid, smooth, sliding steps These movements will help your child develop body awareness, space awareness, and coordination. Children love animals! Here is an activity that will use your child’s love of animals to learn new forms of movement. Simply collect pictures of different animals out of magazines or newspapers, paste the pictures on pieces of cardboard, then have your child imitate the movements of the animals!Children love animals! Here is an activity that will use your child’s love of animals to learn new forms of movement. Simply collect pictures of different animals out of magazines or newspapers, paste the pictures on pieces of cardboard, then have your child imitate the movements of the animals!

14. 14 Indoor Community Activities Swimming Pool School Gyms or Covered Playgrounds Bowling Alley If you don’t have enough space at home for indoor games, consider using community physical activity facilities. Swimming pools and bowling alleys are great places to be active that often aren’t too expensive. Schools often host “Open Gym” night, and some schools have covered play areas you may be able to use. In addition, you may be able to walk the hallways of your local high school after school hours. Or, if there is a mall or large store in your town you could go there to walk and window shop. If you don’t have enough space at home for indoor games, consider using community physical activity facilities. Swimming pools and bowling alleys are great places to be active that often aren’t too expensive. Schools often host “Open Gym” night, and some schools have covered play areas you may be able to use. In addition, you may be able to walk the hallways of your local high school after school hours. Or, if there is a mall or large store in your town you could go there to walk and window shop.

15. 15 Decrease Inactivity Children should not be inactive for more than an hour at a time Limit inactivity by: Limit T.V. watching to 2hrs/day, 1hr at a time Limit computer/video games to 1hr/day Encourage both morning and afternoon outdoor play on weekends Reducing the time kids are not moving is just as important as having them participate in physical activity. Even if they aren’t active enough to raise their heart rate or sweat, getting kids off the couch doing something (like helping with household chores!) will help boost energy levels. Weekends are when kids tend to spend the most time inactive. To help kids get moving on the weekend days, plan an activity or let them play outside both before and after lunch. Have them brainstorm activity ideas during the week, and make a written schedule for the weekend to post on the refrigerator. Reducing the time kids are not moving is just as important as having them participate in physical activity. Even if they aren’t active enough to raise their heart rate or sweat, getting kids off the couch doing something (like helping with household chores!) will help boost energy levels. Weekends are when kids tend to spend the most time inactive. To help kids get moving on the weekend days, plan an activity or let them play outside both before and after lunch. Have them brainstorm activity ideas during the week, and make a written schedule for the weekend to post on the refrigerator.

16. 16 Research shows that as TV time increases, so do rates of overweight in teenagers. It’s not clear whether this effect is due to TV taking the place of physical activity, or teens eating more while watching TV, or both. NHES Youth Aged 12-17 in 1967-70 and NLSY Youth Aged 10-15 in 1990 Research shows that as TV time increases, so do rates of overweight in teenagers. It’s not clear whether this effect is due to TV taking the place of physical activity, or teens eating more while watching TV, or both. NHES Youth Aged 12-17 in 1967-70 and NLSY Youth Aged 10-15 in 1990

17. 17 In Alaska, nearly 30% of high school students watch more than 3 hours of television on an average school day! Just imagine how many more hours are spent watching T.V. on weekends…..In Alaska, nearly 30% of high school students watch more than 3 hours of television on an average school day! Just imagine how many more hours are spent watching T.V. on weekends…..

18. 18 Bad Habits Start Early Kids should have less than 2 hours of screen time setting limits on time spent in front of a screen monitor time spent in front of the screen avoid putting a T.V. in a child’s bedroom. Preschool children with a television in their bedroom are more likely to be overweight Slide # 18 Preschool children may have already developed a habit of watching television and playing video games. In our country the average child spends nearly 5 hours each day watching T.V. or playing video/computer games. The Association of American Pediatrics recommends that kids accumulate 2 hours or less each day of screen time.5 Try and curb these habits by setting limits on time spent in front of a screen. One way to monitor time spent watching television is to avoid putting a T.V. in a child’s bedroom. Research shows that preschool children with a television in their bedroom watch an additional 4.8 hours of TV or videos every week and are more likely to be overweight than children without a bedroom T.V.6 Having young children watch T.V. in the living room allows you to monitor content as well as time spent watching television. Slide # 18 Preschool children may have already developed a habit of watching television and playing video games. In our country the average child spends nearly 5 hours each day watching T.V. or playing video/computer games. The Association of American Pediatrics recommends that kids accumulate 2 hours or less each day of screen time.5 Try and curb these habits by setting limits on time spent in front of a screen. One way to monitor time spent watching television is to avoid putting a T.V. in a child’s bedroom. Research shows that preschool children with a television in their bedroom watch an additional 4.8 hours of TV or videos every week and are more likely to be overweight than children without a bedroom T.V.6 Having young children watch T.V. in the living room allows you to monitor content as well as time spent watching television.

19. 19 Television can be used Promote Physical Activity Consider watching a sporting event or outdoor recreation show and then go outside and try the activity Use commercial breaks Have a family push-up or sit-up contest! Several programs include healthy behaviors. Sesame Street has lessons on healthy eating Oscar the Grouch promotes activity with the “Worm Workout Song”. Believe it or not, it is possible to be active and get good activity ideas from watching television! When you and your child do watch T.V., consider watching a sporting event or outdoor recreation show and then go outside and try the activity. Also, use those annoying commercial breaks to get your own quick workout…try having a family push-up or sit-up contest! In addition, there are several programs targeted at children that include promotion of healthy behaviors. Sesame Street has regular lessons on healthy eating and Oscar the Grouch even sings the “Worm Workout Song” and encourages everyone watching to bend, twist and crawl along. Believe it or not, it is possible to be active and get good activity ideas from watching television! When you and your child do watch T.V., consider watching a sporting event or outdoor recreation show and then go outside and try the activity. Also, use those annoying commercial breaks to get your own quick workout…try having a family push-up or sit-up contest! In addition, there are several programs targeted at children that include promotion of healthy behaviors. Sesame Street has regular lessons on healthy eating and Oscar the Grouch even sings the “Worm Workout Song” and encourages everyone watching to bend, twist and crawl along.

20. 20 Activities to Keep Kids Busy Set up “play time” play with blocks or Legos, or play board games. Invite your child to join you in the kitchen When kids help in the kitchen they are decreasing time spent inactive Slide #20: There are always times during the day when parents need time to get work done without the “help” of children. Identify these times during your day and plan fun activities that utilize a child’s imagination instead of relying on television or video games to distract them. The time before the evening meal is usually one of those times. This is the perfect time for kids to play outside or have “clean up time” inside. If weather is bad or children are too young to play outside unsupervised, this can be “play time” when kids can color, play with blocks or Legos, or play board games. If none of these is appealing to your child, have them join you in the kitchen and “cook” their own meal by combining ingredients you have set out for them in small containers. Or, have kids make their own pizza on a prepackaged crust with simple ingredients like cheese and pepperoni. When kids help in the kitchen they learn food preparation skills, become acquainted with new foods (which may increase the odds of actually trying them) and are decreasing time spent inactive.Slide #20: There are always times during the day when parents need time to get work done without the “help” of children. Identify these times during your day and plan fun activities that utilize a child’s imagination instead of relying on television or video games to distract them. The time before the evening meal is usually one of those times. This is the perfect time for kids to play outside or have “clean up time” inside. If weather is bad or children are too young to play outside unsupervised, this can be “play time” when kids can color, play with blocks or Legos, or play board games. If none of these is appealing to your child, have them join you in the kitchen and “cook” their own meal by combining ingredients you have set out for them in small containers. Or, have kids make their own pizza on a prepackaged crust with simple ingredients like cheese and pepperoni. When kids help in the kitchen they learn food preparation skills, become acquainted with new foods (which may increase the odds of actually trying them) and are decreasing time spent inactive.

21. 21 Just Move It! Remember…. Kids love to move. Encourage kids to play…but plan time for activity each day too. Take advantage of the Alaskan outdoors. When the weather is bad – be creative! Be an Activity Role Model As a parent remember that it is very important for kids to move as much as possible. Because children have a natural love of moving, your only job is to make sure that they stay safe and have fun doing it! Make sure that your children have time to play freely each day, but plan time in your schedule for structured activity as well. Looking for places to be active in Alaska is as easy as looking out your window. Take advantage of local trails, beaches and mountains to keep your family active and healthy. When the weather is so bad that it’s not safe to be outdoors, think about using community facilities or just be creative in your own home. Either way, try to give your children positive experiences with physical activity so that they will continue to be active and enjoy a long, healthy life.As a parent remember that it is very important for kids to move as much as possible. Because children have a natural love of moving, your only job is to make sure that they stay safe and have fun doing it! Make sure that your children have time to play freely each day, but plan time in your schedule for structured activity as well. Looking for places to be active in Alaska is as easy as looking out your window. Take advantage of local trails, beaches and mountains to keep your family active and healthy. When the weather is so bad that it’s not safe to be outdoors, think about using community facilities or just be creative in your own home. Either way, try to give your children positive experiences with physical activity so that they will continue to be active and enjoy a long, healthy life.

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