Clauses kinds and types coordination and subordination
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Clauses: Kinds and Types Coordination and Subordination. Language Network Pg. 92. Kinds of Clauses. Independent Clause – Contains a subject, a verb, conveys a complete thought, and is also know as a complete sentence

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Clauses: Kinds and Types Coordination and Subordination

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Clauses kinds and types coordination and subordination

Clauses: Kinds and TypesCoordination and Subordination

Language Network

Pg. 92


Kinds of clauses

Kinds of Clauses

  • Independent Clause – Contains a subject, a verb, conveys a complete thought, and is also know as a complete sentence

  • Subordinate Clause - Contains a subject and a verb but does not express a complete thought.


Types of clauses

Types of Clauses

  • Adjective Clause – is a subordinate clause used as an adjective to modify a noun or pronoun

  • Adverb Clause – is a subordinate clause used as an adverb to modify an adjective, adverb, or a verb

  • Noun Clause – is a subordinate clause used as a noun.


Coordination

Coordination

  • Coordination is used to join two independent clauses together.

  • The sentences are joined with a coordinating conjunction (FANBOYS: For, And, Nor, But, Or, Yet, So) + a comma.


Examples

Examples

  • Two independent clauses: The Daily Show is popular. It is more entertaining than reality.

  • Joined through coordination: The Daily Show is popular, and it is more entertaining than reality.


Subordination

Subordination

  • A subordinate clause (dependant clause) contains a subject and a verb, but does not express a complete thought.

  • Like coordination, subordination is a way to join short sentences with related ideas into a longer, more sophisticated sentence.


Examples1

Examples

  • Subordinate clause: because he was accepted into the Officer Training Program

  • *If we left that sentence alone, it would be called a fragment. Why?

  • We will join this subordinate clause to an independent clause to make it a complete thought. We join subordinate clauses with subordinating conjunctions!


Example and subordinating conjunctions

Example and Subordinating Conjunctions

  • Example: Patti is proud of her son because he was accepted into the Officer Training Program

  • Subordinating conjunctions: After, Although, As, Because, Before, Until, When, Where, While, Since, and there are others.


Where does the subordinating clause go in a sentence

Where does the subordinating clause go in a sentence?

  • When a subordinate clause ends the sentence, it usually does not need to be preceded by a comma (,).

  • You can also put a subordinating conjunction and a subordinating clause at the beginning of a new sentence. When the dependant clause comes first, use a comma to separate it from the rest of the sentence.


Example

Example

  • When I eat out, I usually have steak.

  • Identify the subordinating conjunction, subordinating clause, and the independent clause.


Answers

Answers…

  • When (Subordinating conjunction)

  • I eat out (Subordinating clause)

  • I usually eat steak. (Independent clause)

    Who are my winners?


Why do we need to know this

Why do we need to know this?

  • Using subordination creates variety in your sentence structure, and gives your writing style.


T here are other ways to create variety

There are other ways to create variety

  • You can use a prepositional phrase, infinitive phrase, participle phrase, and a gerund phrase to start any sentence!

  • Prepositional phrase: Through the woods

  • Infinitive phrase (to + a verb) To win is my passion

  • Participle phrase: The screaming goat was caught in the fence.

  • Gerund phrase: Swimming is my worst fear

  • Appositive Phrase: Sharon, my friend.


Adjective clauses

Adjective Clauses

  • Essential and nonessential adjective clauses:

  • “That” is used to introduce an essential clause (No comma)

  • “Which” is used to introduce a nonessential clause. (Comma)

  • Adjectives tell: which one, how many, how much, or what kind

  • A subordinate clause that is used to modify a noun or pronoun.

  • Words that introduce adjective clauses: who, whom, whose, that, which, when, where, why.


Adverb clauses

Adverb Clauses

  • Subordinative conjunctions are used to introduce an adverb clause. Look on pg. 96 at the table for examples.

  • Adverbs tell: where, why, how, when, or to what degree something was done

  • A subordinate clause used to modify a verb, adjective or adverb


Classwork

Classwork:

On pg. 97,

1-10 A.

Write the adjective or adverb clause and the word those modify.

Example:

  • Who have family trees / ones


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